Hilo

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2019, Part Three

 

This is the third of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2019 (and one student from the Class of 2020) gathered at PBS Hawaiʻi to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

This episode features Carl Antiado, who graduated from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui and is now a Computer Science and Engineering major at the University of Nevada Reno; Kobie Uyeda, who graduated from Waiākea High School in Hilo and is now a Kinesiology Pre-Med major at Oregon State University; and Brandon Marcos, who graduated from Kauaʻi High School on Kauaʻi and is now majoring in Computer Science at UH Mānoa

 

Each graduate also shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Carl shows his story about a band teacher he had who inspired Carl and turned him onto a new perspective on life. Kobie shares her story “Stay Humble, Pray,” about an ex-convict/drug addict who speaks to students about how to avoid bad life choices. Brandon presents his story “Kapaʻa Gridlock,” an investigation into why traffic is so heavy on Kauaʻi.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2019, Part One

 

This is the first of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2019 (and one student from the Class of 2020) gathered at PBS Hawaiʻi to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

Part One features Emily Tsuji, who graduated from Waiākea High School in Hilo and is now a freshman at Cal State Long Beach; Rebecca Meyer, who graduated from Sacred Hearts Academy on Oʻahu and is now majoring in Communications at Creighton University in Nebraska; and Selwyn Madarang, who graduated from Farrington High School on Oʻahu and is now majoring in Digital Media Video for Web at Leeward Community College.

 

Each graduate shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Emily shares her story “Foster Care” about a married couple who dedicate their professional and personal lives to the care of foster children. Selwyn shows “Feeding the Little Leaguers” about the 2018 Little League World Series Champions from Hawaiʻi and the importance they placed on local food for staying connected to home while on the road. Rebecca shares her story “Ride Share” on the controversial issue of whether or not minors should be allowed to use ride-sharing services like Uber on their own.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
The 2018 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge – High School Division

 

This special edition features stories from the High School Division of the 2018 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge. On October 19, 2018, ten participating high school teams and twelve participating middle school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the theme “the story behind the food”. Teachers could not provide hands-on help. The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own. The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

  1. How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?
  2. How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ  Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?
  3. How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, first place, second place, third place, and honorable mention awards were given in both the high school and middle school divisions. The winning high school stories featured in this episode are as follows:

 

–Tied for First Place: Kauaʻi High School in Lihue profiled the late Barbara Funamura, the originator of the spam musubi.

 

–Tied for First Place: Kamehameha Schools Maui High School in Pukalani profiled Maui chef Jonathan Mizukami.

 

–Second Place: H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui featured the family story behind Aunty Lia’s Baked Goods.

 

–Third Place: Kapa‘a High School on Kauaʻi spotlighted Pono Market in Kapaʻa.

 

–Honorable Mention: Farrington High School on Oʻahu revealed how much members of Hawaiʻi’s world championship little league team missed Hawai‘i food when they were on the road.

 

Also featured:

 

–Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island highlighted iconic Hilo eatery Kandi’s Drive-Inn.

 

–Moanalua High School on Oʻahu told the story of a young man who is carrying on his late father’s legacy through his family’s Chamorro Grindz food truck.

 

–Wa‘ianae High School on Oʻahu showed how a stay-at-home mom brought together her entire family through her Padicakes mochi business.

 

First place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Second place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Third place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Honorable mention winners will receive $100 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Unified Sports

 

TOP STORY

 

“Unified Sports”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului feature fellow student Britney Bautista. Britney, who has a developmental delay syndrome, has gained a sense of belonging through the school’s Special Olympics Unified Sports program. This program brings students with and without disabilities together to participate in sports, socials, and other extracurricular activities. Britney is also one of only twelve U.S. youth ambassadors to the Special Olympics, which gives her a voice to advocate for the advancement of inclusive youth leadership. “My goal is to introduce Special Olympics to the younger generation,” says Britney. “I want them to learn that everyone is the same, and nobody should be judged by what their physical characteristics look like.”

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy in Waimea on Hawaiʻi Island introduce us to a wahine paniolo champion.

 

Students from Hilo Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a bone marrow donor in Hilo who discovered that the recipient of his bone marrow lives just a few minutes away from him.

 

Students from Hawaiʻi Technology Academy on Oʻahu profile Hawaiʻi’s fledgling ice hockey league.

 

Students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a dedicated group of dog lovers who place homeless canines with their new, forever owners.

 

Students from Mililani High School in Central Oʻahu share a public service announcement about simple changes people can make that will have a positive impact on life in Hawaiʻi.

 

Plus, a montage of HIKI NŌ stories from Saint Francis School on Oʻahu, whose 95-year-old history is ending at the close of this school year.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ also features students’ profiles on their HIKI NŌ teachers.

 

 

 

Hula as a Bedrock of 21st-Century Success

 

CEO Message

 

Hula as a Bedrock of 21st-Century Success

 

This month, the renowned musical Lim Family of Kohala on the Big Island takes the stage on Nā Mele: Traditions in Hawaiian Song (Mon., Jan. 28, 7:30 pm). We at PBS Hawai‘i have wanted to feature this remarkable ‘ohana for years.

 

However, it’s not easy to catch the family members in one place for long! They’re often in different parts of the Islands, and in farflung countries, in versatile groups, performing and teaching. Ed Yap, a family musician and husband of fellow performer and kumu hula Nani Lim Yap, is known for his flying fingers, booking and re-booking airline tickets online as plans evolve.

 

As I interviewed Nani for an upcoming episode of Long Story Short (Tues., Jan. 22, 7:30 pm), I saw once again, with another Island family, that the tradition of hula can serve as a bedrock for modern business success. Nani has long been in demand as a hula teacher in Japan and now, China, for her deep knowledge of this ancient art.

 

“(Hula) is about the collective, and it is about recognizing that together, we produce something that is amazing.” – Ulalia Woodside, Executive Director, Nature Conservancy of Hawai‘i

 

Nani and Ed’s son Manaola Yap, appearing in a Long Story Short encore (Tues., Jan. 15, 7:30 pm) is a young fashion designer and business owner with national and international credentials. “My background in design, and everything I do, comes from hula,” he says.

 

A dancer performing HulaAs a child, he helped his mother stage hula dramas for hotel visitors, creating costumes that helped tell the stories. For a dance honoring Pele, the fire goddess, he says Nani burned all of the edges of the dancers’ fabric “to a crisp.”

 

Successful father-and-son designers and hula practitioners Sig and Kuha‘o Zane of Hilo, Hawai‘i Island, also credit hula with inspiring and sustaining their aloha shirt business. For Sig, it started decades ago with wanting to make a special gift to court his future wife, seventh-generation kumu hula Nālani Kanaka‘ole. Sig learned silk screening and created plant designs, because in hula, many plant forms are important. Like Manaola, he had no formal design or business training.

 

Ulalia Woodside, Executive Director of the Nature Conservancy of Hawai‘i, oversees 40,000 acres of preservation lands. She grew up in Waimānalo, Windward O‘ahu, learning the discipline and interconnectedness of the hula tradition. She says it forged her view of how to live life and how to carry out her work.

 

“(Hula) is about the collective,” she says, “it is about recognizing that together, we produce something that is amazing.”

 

Season’s Aloha

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HIKI NŌ
Episode #903 – Young Pig Farmer

 

TOP STORY

Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu tell the story of Matthew Reyes Jr., an enterprising young pig farmer who helps his parent run Reyes’ Hog Farm in Ma‘ili. Matthew is so dedicated to his family’s business that he sacrifices any semblance of a social life. All of his waking hours are taken up by attending high school and working on the pig farm. Through this dedication, he has developed an in- depth knowledge of the pig farming business and a great sense of pride in his profession. He does want to study business once he gets to college because he feels it will give him an edge in this very competitive industry.

 

ALSO FEATURED

–Students from Waīakea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island introduce us to a high school track star who, through the friendship and camaraderie she developed with her teammates and coaches, learned to love a sport she once dreaded.

 

–Students from Kalama Intermediate School in Makawao, Maui, feature a Hawaiian Immersion teacher who connects to her culture by painting words that express its values.

 

–Students from ‘Ilima Intermediate School in ‘Ewa, O‘ahu, tell the story of a young French horn player who learns about herself in the process of learning the music.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle introduce us to a wheelchair-bound school counselor who sees challenges not as obstacles, but as a way to grow.

 

–Students from Kaua‘i High School in Līhu‘e tell the story of young Thai immigrants who learn the value of hard work in Hawai‘i’s fast food industry.

 

–Students from Pacific Buddhist Academy present a primer on the ancient Japanese martial art of kendo.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 18, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Aug. 19, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode # 920: Paula Keele, a wellness educator and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani profile Paula Keele, a wellness educator who teaches a class called enhanced fitness to senior citizens at Kahului Union Church. Ms. Keele started the program because her mother had become debilitated by foregoing the proper physical therapy after she broke her shoulder. “I really want to make sure that seniors stay healthy for as long as possible,” says Keele. Her students, however, seem to be teaching Keele as much as she is teaching them. “My students have taught me patience,” she says. “They’ve taught me kindness. They’ve set really great examples, almost like mentors, on how I can be better as I get older.”

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Seabury Hall Middle School in Upcountry Maui explore the plight of one of the longest surviving species on earth—the sea turtle.

 

–Students from Roosevelt High School in the Makiki district of O‘ahu profile a Japanese immigrant student at Roosevelt who had a hard time fitting in until other students began to respect him for who he is.

 

–Students from Waiākea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island introduce us to a dancer who uses dancing to alleviate the extreme pain she suffers from a rare physical disorder.

 

–Students from Dole Middle School in the Kalihi district of O‘ahu teach us the tinikling, a traditional Filipino dance that has participants jumping in and out between two moving bamboo poles.

 

–Students from Wheeler Middle School on O‘ahu tell the story of a young woman who climbs Mt. Kilimanjaro as a means of healing.

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a deaf cheerleader who refuses to be called disabled and feels she can achieve anything that a hearing person can.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Wallace Rider Farrington High School in the Kalihi district of O‘ahu.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 914 – Top Story: The Many Faces of Hope

 

This week’s episode of HIKI NŌ spotlights seven of the most outstanding stories from the winter quarter of the 2017-2018 school year. The seven selected stories also share a common theme: hope. The island residents featured in this show each express personal hopes for themselves, their families and their communities. Each one is on a mission to turn that hope into reality.

 

THE STORIES:

–Students from Hongwanji Mission School on O‘ahu go off-the-air with Billy V, a local media celebrity who opens up about the physical and emotional journey that’s accompanied his cancer treatment. Billy V expresses his hope to recover from cancer and continue his fulfilling life and work.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu go aboard the Hōkūle‘a voyaging canoe to show us how the current crew is teaching ancient navigation techniques to a new generation. In this story, Master Navigator Nainoa Thompson shares his hope that younger Hawaiians will take up the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s mission of perpetuating traditional voyaging and the spirit of exploration.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School take us to Noho‘ana Farm in Waikapū to meet a man who is preserving his heritage and his culture by restoring his family’s ancient taro farm. He hopes to share his knowledge and instill a sense of kuleana in younger Hawaiians so they can continue the tradition of kalo farming into the future.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on the Big Island relay the inspirational story of a teacher who hiked the Pacific Crest Trail – from Mexico to Canada – as part of her recovery from the trauma of sexual assault. She hopes this challenge will help her take back control of her body and her life.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu show us how a high school athlete hopes to overcome his short stature to pursue his dream of playing varsity soccer.

 

–Students from Waiākea High School in Hilo on the Big Island introduce us to a man who’s spreading his motto: “Stay Humble, Pray.” This former prisoner visits Hawai‘i high schools to share his story of drug addiction in the hope of persuading students not to make the mistakes he made.

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului introduce us to a family learning to embrace what life brings after their baby is born with the genetic disorder known as Down Syndrome. The Garcias of Pukalani hope their love and devotion will guarantee their daughter’s happiness. And they hope to share their blessings and inspire their neighbors through their family company, Aloha Kettlecorn.

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ is hosted by two students from Farrington High School on O‘ahu: 9th grader Shaylen Tatupu-Timu and 10th grader Harvey Saucedo.

 

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode # 909: Top Story – The pros and cons of using Uber and other ride-sharing services

 

TOP STORY
Students from Sacred Hearts Academy in Kaimuki on O‘ahu explore the pros and cons of using Uber and other ride-sharing services. The main issues raised by students, parents and drivers revolve around convenience versus safety for young riders. The story also explains Uber’s policy that restricts minors from riding alone, a fact of which many teenagers and parents are unaware. The student reporters learn that Uber is testing a service for teens in several cities, though not yet here in Hawai‘i.

 

ALSO FEATURED
–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School explain how their robotics coach found his passion while teaching students to stretch their tech expertise.

 

–Students from Farrington High School in Kalihi on O‘ahu introduce us to an alum who has devoted decades to preserving the school’s history and spreading a positive message about the school and its students.

 

–Students from the Montessori School of Maui Middle School explore the pervasive problem of bullying and offer tips for students dealing with bullies at school.

 

–A student from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i shows and tells us how Tahitian dance has helped her relieve stress, enjoy life and preserve her cultural traditions.

 

–Students from Waiākea High School in Hilo on the Big Island profile a student athlete who proves that determination can overcome her physical disadvantage and beat the competition.

 

 

Welcome to Our New Board Chair!

Welcome to Our New Board Chair, Jason Fujimoto

PBS Hawai‘i’s new Board Chair Jason Fujimoto

 

He’s the first Neighbor Islander to head the Board of Directors of statewide PBS Hawaiʻi; he is by far our youngest Board Chair; and he’s the fifth generation of a successful family company, founded by an immigrant.

 

Meet Jason Fujimoto of Hilo, 36, husband of Tobie and father of two children. This summer, he succeeded longtime PBS Hawai‘i Board Chair Robbie Alm.

 

In Jason’s “day job,” he serves as President and Chief Operating Officer of HPM Building Supply, overseeing company business on Hawai‘i Island, Maui and Kauaʻi. His role with nonprofit PBS Hawai‘i is unpaid, and he knows what he’s getting into, as he is our Board’s former Vice Chair.

 

“PBS Hawai‘i is really special because it’s not controlled by big media; it’s really Hawai‘i’s TV station, it’s our station,” Jason says.

 

“When you look at the opportunity we have here as an organization, and it goes beyond media, it’s… bringing people of all cultures and professions together and really looking toward the future and solving some of the key issues and problems that we have as a state,” he said.

 

Jason will tell you that he spent his childhood in Hilo, but that he really grew up on Sesame Street. Public television was on the screen in his family home. His parents, Mike and Thuy Fujimoto, and grandparents Robert and Alice Fujimoto, highly value education. They did everything they could to help Jason deepen his knowledge and broaden his horizons.

 

The horizons he chose included the renowned Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. After earning a degree in corporate finance and strategic management, Jason became an investment banker in New York City, working on mergers and acquisitions for J.P. Morgan.

 

Jason had grown wings but he hadn’t forgotten his roots. In 2004, he was ready to return to Hawai‘i, for the chance to do work that was more entrepreneurial and more fulfilling than what Wall Street offered. He found it at his family’s employee-owned company. HPM Building Supply may be best known for its “package home” program, which makes homeownership more affordable.

 

In 2013, Hawaii Business Magazine named Jason Fujimoto as a business person to watch over the years, one of the “20 for the Next 20.”

 

Earlier this year, Jason led our Board and Staff and other stakeholders in envisioning new strategic goals for PBS Hawai‘i. Everyone felt free to speak and share their different ideas. There was civility and humor and, later, a clear consensus. We’re making our video content more accessible, more quickly, in different forms, on different media platforms; and we’re
taking new steps to address financial sustainability in changing times.

 

As CEO, I look forward to working closely with Jason. He places a high value on lifelong learning and integrity, has that old-time Hilo knack for building relationships, and leads from the heart.

 

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