Iolani School

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 911: Focus On Compassion: Self-Identity, Crystal Cebedo update

 

This episode is an encore presentation of a HIKI NŌ special that first aired in the summer of 2017– HIKI NŌ Focus On Compassion: Self-Identity –hosted and co-written by HIKI NŌ alumna and Wai‘anae High School graduate Crystal Cebedo. This encore presentation includes a brief update on Crystal, who is majoring in Marketing and Human Resources at Menlo College in Atherton, California on a full scholarship.

 

The HIKI NŌ stories in this special look at compassion for self-identity in terms of culture, gender, body image, ethnicity, or appearance. They include:

 

“Calcee Nance” from Kaua‘i High School on Kaua‘i: the story of a teen mentor at the Boys and Girls Club whose instinct to nurture and feed others was inspired by her relationship with her late mother.

 

“Kimberly Yap” from Lahainaluna High School on Maui: the story of a young woman whose decisions about her future are complicated by her multicultural identity as a half Filipina, half Micronesian born in Kiribati and raised on Maui.

 

“Mark Yamanaka” from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu: a feature on Mark Yamanaka, a Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award-winning musician, who overcame internal conflicts about being a non-Hawaiian playing Hawaiian music. He has since been embraced by the Hawaiian music community for his commitment to learning and singing in the Hawaiian language and his skillful guitar playing.

 

“Cosplay” from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island: a look at how cosplay – dressing up as characters from books, movies, or your own imagination – gave a group of high school students the freedom to express their true selves in a creative and fun way.

 

“Body Image” from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: a look at how the images of females onscreen and in magazines had a negative impact on one girl’s self-image and self-confidence.

 

“Through Rachel’s Camera” from ‘Iolani School on O‘ahu: the story of a young woman who uses her camera and art to combat traditional gender stereotypes and to express her identity as a feminist and activist.

 

“Pride and Diversity” from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu: a feature on how the Honolulu Pride Parade and Festival helps support and encourage LGBTQ youth who often don’t see themselves reflected in their school or local communities.

 

“Aurora’s Story” from Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu: a look at how one teacher uses her experience with trichotillomania, an impulse disorder that results in her pulling out her hair, to teach her students about self-acceptance.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Focus on Compassion: Self-Identity

 

The third of four Focus on Compassion HIKI NŌ episodes compiles archived stories that center on the theme of compassion for self-identity. This four-episode series is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ and Wai‘anae High School graduate who is currently attending Menlo College in Atherton, California. The stories in this episode look specifically at compassion for self-identity in terms of culture, gender, body image, ethnicity, or appearance.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this Focus on Compassion show include:

 

“Calcee Nance” from Kaua‘i High School on Kaua‘i: the story of a teen mentor at the Boys and Girls Club whose instinct to nurture and feed others was inspired by her relationship with her late mother.

 

“Kimberly Yap” from Lahainaluna High School on Maui: the story of a young woman whose decisions about her future are complicated by her multicultural identity as a half-Filipina, half-Micronesian born in Kiribati and raised on Maui.

 

“Mark Yamanaka” from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu: a feature on Mark Yamanaka, a Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award-winning musician, who overcame internal conflicts about being a non-Hawaiian playing Hawaiian music. He has since been embraced by the Hawaiian music community for his commitment to learning and singing in the Hawaiian language and his skillful guitar playing.

 

“Cosplay” from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island: a look at how cosplay – dressing up as characters from books, movies, or your own imagination – gave a group of high school students the freedom to express their true selves in a creative and fun way.

 

“Body Image” from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: a look at how the images of females onscreen and in magazines had a negative impact on one girl’s self-image and self-confidence.

 

“Through Rachel’s Camera” from ‘Iolani School on O‘ahu: the story of a young woman who uses her camera and art to combat traditional gender stereotypes and to express her identity as a feminist and activist.

 

“Pride and Diversity” from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu: a feature on how the Honolulu Pride Parade and Festival helps support and encourage LGBTQ youth who often don’t see themselves reflected in their school or local communities.

 

“Aurora’s Story” from Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu: a look at how one teacher uses her experience with trichotillomania, an impulse disorder that results in her pulling out her hair, to teach her students about self-acceptance.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 23, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 24, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: Ha’aha’a

 

This episode is the third in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is ha’aha’a, which means humbleness and humility. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai. They feature a Kauai resident named Moses Hamilton who learned humbleness and humility when he had to start all over again after a tragic car accident that left him a quadraplegic. While undergoing re-hab, Moses took up mouth painting (painting by holding and manipulating the paint brush in one’s mouth), and is a now a successful artist who sells his paintings at a shopping mall in Hanalei, Kauai.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Ka Waihona o Ka Naauao (Oahu): Uncle George, a native Hawaiian stand-up paddle board instructor in West Oahu, exemplifies humbleness by giving away something of great value – paddle board lessons – for free.

 

Roosevelt High School (Oahu): A Roosevelt High School student uses his experience growing up in poverty-stricken countries to instill a sense of humility in his fellow students.

 

Lahaina Intermediate School (Maui): A retiree-turned-elementary-school crossing guard proves that a humbleness of spirit comes in handy when dedicating your life to the safety of young children in your community.

 

Mililani Middle School (Oahu): After years in the spotlight as star quarterback for the UH football team, Garrett Gabriel choses the much more humble profession of counseling.

 

Iolani School (Oahu): The value of ha’aha’a, or humbleness, teaches us that we are neither indestructible nor immortal. This realization may have saved the life of a coach at Iolani School.
Waianae High School (Oahu): This story explores how a family in West Oahu deals with a very humbling experience: the onset of dementia in the family matriarch.

 

This episode is hosted by Aiea High School in Honolulu.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 20 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Aug. 21 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, PBSHawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Top Story: Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School, Joseph Kekuku

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School in Nanakuli on Oahu tell the story of Joseph Kekuku, the Native Hawaiian musician from Laie who discovered the Hawaiian Steel Guitar over 100 years ago. Legend has it that Kekuku accidentally dropped his comb on the strings of his guitar one day and liked what he heard. He then developed the sound and technique that became known as Hawaiian steel guitar. When he took that sound abroad it caught on and was one of the reasons why Hawaiian music enjoyed world-wide popularity in the 1920s and 30s. The story includes interviews with Kekuku’s grandson Uncle Joe Ah Quin and grandnieces Aunty Kaiwa Meyer and Aunty Gladys Pualoa-Ahuna.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Kauai High School on the Garden Isle tell the story of a science-trained farmer who turned his love of the science of food into a thriving, family-run food truck.

 

Students from Kapaa Middle School on Kauai show us how to turn old, discarded crayons into colorful abstract art.

 

For a very different approach to art, we tap the HIKI NŌ archives to revisit a story from Iolani School on Oahu about a young conceptual artist/photographer.

 

Students from Kainalu Elementary School in Windward Oahu show us the therapeutic value of miniature horses for special needs children.

 

Students from Saint Francis School on Oahu introduce us to a teacher who is dedicated to bridging the communication gap between the deaf and hearing communities through American Sign Language.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 4 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 5 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

Free Public Screenings of Top Student Video Stories at Local HIKI NŌ Festivals

Press Release Header

 

HONOLULU, HI – Top stories from the past season of HIKI NŌ, PBS Hawaii’s statewide student news network, will be shown at free public screenings on Maui, the Big Island, Kauai and Oahu as part of the 2015 HIKI NŌ Festival. All of the stories in the festival have been nominated for the 2015 HIKI NŌ Awards.

 

“While all stories that air on HIKI NŌ meet our standards, these nominated stories represent the best of the best and the HIKI NŌ Festival is a great way for these young storytellers to show the state what they can do. We invite the public to come and celebrate the great work of these students,”  says HIKI NŌ Executive Producer Robert Pennybacker.

 

The festival honors student-created video stories that aired last school year on HIKI NŌ, PBS Hawaii’s student news program. Click here for a complete list of nominated schools.

 

The HIKI NŌ Festival screening events are free of charge and will be at these locations:

 



MAUI

RSVP for 2015 HIKI NŌ Festival

 

 



HILO (Big Island)

RSVP for 2015 HIKI NŌ Festival

 

 



KONA (Big Island)

RSVP for 2015 HIKI NŌ Festival

 

 



KAUAI

RSVP for 2015 HIKI NŌ Festival

 

 



OAHU

RSVP for 2015 HIKI NŌ Festival

 

HIKI NŌ award winners will be determined through numeric scoring by a panel of veteran industry professionals and will be announced via live stream on Thursday, September 24 at PBSHawaii.org. Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS Hawaii, will present the winners with Donna Tanoue, President of Bank of Hawaii Foundation, HIKI NŌ’s founding broadcast sponsor. The winning school in each category will receive $1,000 in equipment from B&H Photo, plus the HIKI NŌ Shooting Star Award trophy.

 

HIKI NŌ (which means “can do” in the Hawaiian language) is PBS Hawaii’s groundbreaking statewide student news network. Students use 21st-century skills to produce hyperlocal stories that meet PBS national adult journalism standards. A half-hour weekly program airs Thursdays at 7:30 pm on public television. View past episodes or learn more about HIKI NŌ online at PBSHawaii.org/hikino.

 

PBS Hawaii is Hawaii’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawaii and Hawaii to the world.

 

PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii on Twitter

 

HIKI NŌ is Hawaii’s first statewide student news network, made up of 86 public, private and charter schools from across the islands. Through the production of video news stories about their schools and communities, students gain valuable workforce and life skills, while teachers engage their students in hands-on, collaborative learning.

PBSHawaii.org/hikino | facebook.com/hikinocando | @hikinocando on Twitter

 

2015 HIKI NŌ AWARD—NOMINEES

 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE—MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School – “Papa Fu” (Kauai)

Kapaa Middle School – “Fire Knife Dancer” (Kauai)

King Intermediate School – “DJ Aisha” (Oahu)

Lahaina Intermediate School – “Security Guard” (Maui)

Seabury Hall Middle School – “Marching Band Director” (Maui)

 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE—HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

Campbell High School – “Dancing Teen”   (Oahu)

Hana K-12 School – “Songbird of Hana” (Maui)

Iolani School – “Summer Kozai”   (Oahu)

Kealakehe High School – “Red Cross Volunteer” (Hawaii Island)

Mid-Pacific Institute – “Mark Yamanaka” (Oahu)

 

BEST HOME-BASE SCHOOL—MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle (Maui)

Kapaa Middle School (Kauai)

Punahou Middle School (Oahu)

 

BEST HOME-BASE SCHOOL—HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

Island School (Kauai)

Kaiser High School (Oahu)

Kua o ka La Public Charter School Milolii Hipuu Virtual Academy (Hawaii Island)

Leilehua High School (Oahu)

Mid-Pacific Institute (Oahu)

 

BEST NEWS WRITING—MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Aliamanu Middle School – “Ms. Lee Loy” (Oahu)

Ewa Makai Middle School – “Tech P.E.” (Oahu)

Hongwanji Mission School – “Father Coach” (Oahu)

Maui Waena Intermediate School – “Sports Complex” (Maui)

 

BEST NEWS WRITING—HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

Kalaheo High School – “Battery 405” (Oahu)

Kamehameha Schools Kapalama – “Never Alone Video Game” (Oahu)

Kua o ka La Public Charter School Milolii Hipuu Virtual Academy – “Mauna Kea TMT” (Hawaii Island)

Maui High School – “All Pono Sports” (Maui)

Waimea High School – “Historic Waimea Theater” (Kauai)

 

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY (HIGH SCHOOL & MIDDLE SCHOOL COMBINED)

Island School – “Champion Body Boarder” (Kauai)

Hawaii Preparatory Academy – “Waipio Valley Taro” (Hawaii Island)

Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle – “Kula Farmer” (Maui)

Kapaa High School – “Kauai Juice Company” (Kauai)

Maui High School – “School Safety” (Maui)

Waiakea High School – “Two Ladies Kitchen” (Hawaii Island)

Waianae High School – “Water Safety Heroes” (Oahu)

Waipahu High School – “Following Victoria Cuba” (Oahu)

 

BEST OVERALL STORY—MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School – “Plantation Coffee Company” (Kauai)

Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School – “Kaahaaina’s Thanksgiving” (Oahu)

Maui Waena Intermediate School – “Community Service” (Maui)

Waianae Intermediate School – “Beauty and the Beast” (Oahu)

Wheeler Middle School – “Climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro” (Oahu)

 

BEST OVERALL STORY—HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

H.P. Baldwin High School – “Anti-Meth Teen” (Maui)

Konawaena High School – “Sticking With Lacrosse” (Hawaii Island)

Maui High School – “Avalon Angel of ALS” (Maui)

Waiakea High School – “ACL Injuries” (Hawaii Island)

Waianae High School – “Stressed Athlete” (Oahu)

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Island School, Lihue

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Island School from Lihue, Kauai.

 

Top Story:
Kealakehe High School on Hawaii Island presents a story about students from their school and from Iolani School on Oahu who were selected to participate in a once-in-a-lifetime science project that will send NASA’s dust shield technology to the moon. These robotics students, called MoonRIDERS (Research Investigating Dust Expulsion & Removal Systems), will work with the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems in hands-on experiments testing the capabilities of NASA’s EDS (Electrodynamic Dust Shield). Students will build a mock up lunar lander spacecraft, fabricate the actual flight frame for the mission, mount the EDS on it, install a camera and design a lunar re-duster, then test the entire system on the lower slopes of Mauna Kea to see how well it will remove dust off of the camera lens.

 

Also Featured:
Students at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai visit Hanapepe Nights, a popular art, music and food festival in Kauai’s biggest little town. Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle tell the story of a husband and wife who left their careers as mechanical engineers to farm the very colorful, exotic dragon fruit on Maui. Students from McKinley High School on Oahu profile their school’s cross-country team captain, Hidemasa Vincent Mitsui, who was deemed ineligible to compete during his senior year because he had to repeat the 9th grade when he moved from Japan to Hawaii (OIA rules state that a 5th year student is ineligible to participate in high school sports). Even though he was not able to compete, Vincent inspired his teammates to do their very best and was eventually reinstated when his coach and athletic director appealed to the OIA.

 

Students at Iolani School on Oahu take us behind the scenes with the Iolani Hackers, a group of students and faculty members who create elaborate visual pranks meant to surprise and delight people on campus. Students at Saint Francis School on Oahu introduce us to Isabel Villanueva, the state air riflery champion who excels at the sport despite the fact that she lives with a rare medical condition – linear scleroderma – which causes her physical pain while participating in the sport. Students at Wheeler Middle School on Oahu show us how to stay safe on the internet by using proper social media etiquette and guidelines.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 2 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, May 3 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.