islands

NĀ MELE
Kawai Cockett and Darlene Ahuna

NĀ MELE Kawai Cockett and Darlene Ahuna

 

NĀ MELE features the traditional Hawaiian music of Darlene Ahuna and the late Kawai Cockett. In this vintage performance, Kawai Cockett is backed by Sam Sepitmo and Charlie Wahineho‘okae. Joining Darlene Ahuna are her husband J.J. Ahuna and Led Kaapana. Ha‘aheo Cockett provides hula artistry.

 

 

 

NĀ MELE
Ledward Kaapana and Family

 

On most Friday evenings, slack key artist Ledward Kaapana gets together with his neighbors to share potluck dishes, laughter and music. For Ledward, it’s a tradition that goes back to his younger days in Kalapana on the island of Hawaii. “When I was growing up, we used to have kani ka pila…everybody sit down and enjoy, listen to music,” Ledward remembers. This special Na Mele features Ledward and his sisters Lei Aken, Lehua Nash and Rhoda Kekona, playing their music in Ledward’s garage. Ledward’s falsetto voice leads off with “Nani,” and Lei, Lehua and Rhoda take vocal solos on “Kaneohe,” “Kalapana” and “Holei.”

 

 




NĀ MELE
Keali‘i Reichel

NĀ MELE: Guest artist Keali'i Reichel

 

Keali‘i Reichel has long established himself as one of Hawai‘i’s premier artists. His dedication to the perpetuation of Hawaiian language, song, chanting and hula has evolved into unique and personal performances that showcase the depth of Hawaiian culture for international audiences. This performance, recorded at the PBS Hawai‘i studio, excellently showcases his artistry.

 

 

NĀ MELE
Haunani Apoliona and Kuʻuipo Kumukahi

NĀ MELE: Haunani Apoliona and Kuʻuipo Kumukahi

 

Multiple Hōkū Hanohano Award-winners Haunani Apoliona and Ku’uipo Kumukahi present classic Hawaiian songs in both solo and duet performances.

 

 

NĀ MELE
Kaumakaiwa Lopaka Kanaka ʻole & Kainani Kahaunaele

NĀ MELE: Kaumakaiwa Lopaka Kanaka ʻole & Kainani Kahaunaele

 

NĀ MELE presents two stars of contemporary Hawaiian Music: Kainani Kahaunaele and Kaumakaiwa Lopaka Kanaka’ole. Hawaiian language instructor Kahaunaele’s powerful voice and original compositions have served as a focal point for her research into haku mele. Kanaka’ole, the heir to a family musical legacy, combines traditional Hawaiian instruments and songs to create energy-filled productions that expand the definition of Hawaiian music.

 

 

NĀ MELE
Peter Medeiros

NA MELE Peter Medeiros

 

Slack key artist Peter Medeiros, accompanied by guitarist Josh Silva and bass player Nate Stillman, presents a fun evening of traditional slack key. Joining the trio are the dancers of Pua Ali‘i ‘Ilima, led by kumu hula Vicky and Jeff Kānekaiwilani Takamine. Songs performed include “Ulili E,” “He‘eia,” “Ke Ala O Ka Rose” and “Kananaka.”

 

 

NĀ MELE
The Royal Hawaiian Band

NA MELE Royal Hawaiian Band

 

Founded in 1836 by King Kamehameha III, the Royal Hawaiian Band has
provided audiences the world over with a continual connection to Hawai‘i’s
royal heritage. During this vintage concert set on the grounds of historic
Iolani Palace, Bandmaster Aaron Mahi pays tribute to one of his predecessors,
Henry Berger, Royal Hawaiian Bandmaster from 1871 to 1915 and sometimes called
the “Father of Hawaiian music.”

 

 

NĀ MELE
Led Kaapana, Dennis Kamakahi and Cyril Pahinui

NA MELE Led Kaapana, Dennis Kamakahi and Cyril Pahinui

 

NĀ MELE presents a traditional Hawaiian jam session featuring slack key masters Cyril Pahinui, Led Kaapana and the late Dennis Kamakahi. The program includes sentimental classics with each artist taking a turn on lead vocals and guitar.

 

 

FAMILY INGREDIENTS
California – Pipi Kaula

 

Part foodie, part travelogue, part genealogy, Family Ingredients follows acclaimed Hawai‘i restaurateur and sustainability hero Ed Kenney, as he meets with different individuals in the Islands, and follows each person’s cherished food memory to its origin around the globe. He takes off to explore Okinawa, Tahiti, California, Japan, Puerto Rico and the Hawaiian Islands, showcasing how cuisine can profoundly unite cultures, communities and families.

 

California – Pipi Kaula
At one time, the Hawaiian cowboys were considered some of the best cowboys in the world. They also made the most tender beef jerky called pipi kaula. We’ll trace the origins of the Hawaiian cowboy lifestyle to the adobes of California and discover how these traditions of music and food are still enjoyed today.

 

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