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WASHINGTON WEEK

WASHINGTON WEEK

 

For 40 years, WASHINGTON WEEK has delivered one of the most interesting conversations of the week. It is the longest-running public affairs program on PBS and features a group of journalists participating in roundtable discussions of major news events.

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
When God Sleeps

 

Explore the journey of Iranian musician Shahin Najafi, forced into hiding after hardline clerics issue a fatwa (Islamic ruling) for his death, incensed by a rap song that focuses on the oppression of women, sexism and human rights abuses.

 

 

AMANPOUR ON PBS

Amanpour on PBS

 

Featuring conversations with global leaders and decision makers on the issues affecting the world today, Amanpour on PBS adds to the long tradition of public affairs programming that has been a hallmark of public media for decades.

 

 

WASHINGTON WEEK SPECIAL EDITION

WASHINGTON WEEK SPECIAL EDITION

 

For 40 years, WASHINGTON WEEK has delivered one of the most interesting conversations of the week. It is the longest-running public affairs program on PBS and features a group of journalists participating in roundtable discussions of major news events.

 

 

PACIFIC HEARTBEAT
Sons of Hālawa

 

Feel the pulse of the pacific – the stories of its people, cultures, languages, music and contemporary issues – in Season 5 of PACIFIC HEARTBEAT, the nationally distributed series from Pacific Islanders in Communications and PBS Hawai‘i. The five films in this season highlight struggles, values and victories that draw us together and make our Pacific cultures unique.

 

Sons of Hālawa
Pilipo Solatorio of Molokai is the last to hold the cultural traditions, music and stories of a sacred valley that has been home to his family for hundreds of years. This is an intimate portrait of Solatorio’s search for a successor – before generations of knowledge will be lost forever.

 

ASIAN AMERICAN LIFE

 

This news magazine series features in-depth reports and stories of the Asian American diaspora for a general audience.

 

Asian American Life is an in-depth news magazine program that addresses topical issues affecting the Asian American communities nationwide and profiles Asian American leaders.

 

Congresswoman Hanabusa scheduled for live ‘Insights’ discussion on Trump, Congress

PBS Hawaii

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Liberty Peralta
lperalta@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5030

 

Download this Press Release

 

HONOLULU, HI – Congresswoman Colleen Hanabusa is scheduled to appear on Thursday’s 8:00 pm live broadcast of Insights on PBS Hawai‘i, which will also be live streamed on pbshawaii.org.

 

Congresswoman Colleen Hanabusa is scheduled to appear live on Insights on PBS Hawai‘i, Thursday at 8:00 pm.

 

Hanabusa and other guests will discuss Hawai‘i’s tenuous relationship with President Donald Trump’s administration. The discussion will also explore how Hawai‘i, one of the bluest states in the U.S., will fare with a Republican-controlled Congress on a number of issues, including health care and social services.

 

Other guests have yet to be confirmed.

 

Insights on PBS Hawai‘i is a regularly scheduled, live public affairs program that airs Thursday nights at 8:00 on PBS Hawai‘i, and is live streamed on pbshawaii.org.

 


PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

Life Lessons from Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood – for Adults, Too!

Life Lessons from Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood – for Adults, Too!

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiDaniel Tiger looks more like a stuffed animal than a sage. But he’s as wise as he is fuzzy.

 

In the animated TV show, Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood – built upon Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood – Daniel Tiger shares simple life lessons that help toddlers deal with very real issues, such as disappointment, anger and jealousy.

 

Their parents say the shows provide counsel and reinforcement for them, too.

 

“I wish I could have had a show like that when I was young,” a father told me. “My favorite was the episode about being bullied.”

 

I heard that sentiment again and again at PBS Hawai‘i’s recent Keiki Club parties, as Daniel Tiger mingled with the excited toddler set.

 

“I admit it. I watch the show with my sons,” a mom told me. “And I find myself taking Daniel’s advice. It’s easy to remember, with those little songs that he and his friends sing.”

 

Oh, I know. I recall a heated discussion in the office. It ended with laughter, when a staffer chanted: “When you feel so mad, that you want to roar, take a deep breath, and count to four. 1, 2, 3, 4.”

 

The staffer was channeling Daniel Tiger, of course. The show shares social-emotional skills for preschoolers.

 

Feeling left out, sadness, frustration – these emotions can intrude at any time in life. Daniel Tiger faces these challenges and more with a knowing and positive spirit. He understands that sometimes kids don’t feel like brushing their teeth; potty-training can be awfully tricky; and it can be hard to say you’re sorry.

 

I asked a four-year-old what she learned from her buddy Daniel.

 

“Everyone is big enough to do something,” she answered proudly. “I’m big enough to clean up my toys by myself.”

 

Her mother commented, “I actually found myself thinking about Daniel Tiger during all this negative election stuff. We need to be more kind.”

 

As her child made a new friend in the Keiki Club, her mother added: “I told her that she needs to learn her manners; she wouldn’t want to turn out to be rude and mean, like some of the adults we see on the TV news.”

 

Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood airs daily at 9:00 and 9:30 am on PBS Hawai‘i.

 

Aloha a hui hou,
Leslie signature

 

 

More incumbents sitting out debates?

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I: The set of INSIGHTS

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiGeneral Managers of PBS stations across the country met last month for a strategy session, looking at what kind of programming is needed most in our country, and how to make the content more responsive and more interactive.

 

And in this election year of deep divisions and negativity, we compared notes on our television stations’ political debates and other forums. Longtime station managers remarked that they’d never seen so many local incumbents decline to appear with their challengers on live telecasts and live web streams.

 

“These incumbents have the money to create their own messages through advertising, and that’s what they’re doing instead,” said Tom Axtell, the head of Vegas PBS and a member of the PBS Board of Directors. Another GM noted that many candidates no longer feel obligated to appear alongside their competition because they can speak to the public through low-cost social media.

 

In Hawai‘i, we had our share of incumbents turning down participation in our weekly election forum on Insights on PBS Hawai‘i, noting scheduling conflicts. We know that candidates are busy, so we generally ask them early. And we realize that incumbents may not be terribly motivated to let their lesser-known competitors receive statewide air time.

 

In addition, incumbents from 34 Hawai‘i State House and Senate races faced no opposition from another major-party candidate.

 

We even had a challenger withdraw from a General Election forum. That was Honolulu Mayoral candidate and political veteran Charles Djou. His campaign contended that it had never committed to the forum. (Before the Primary Election, Djou did take part in our forum with incumbent Mayor Kirk Caldwell and former Mayor Peter Carlisle.)

 

The rebuffs by candidates in some major races had a silver lining, freeing up TV time for district races, especially outside Honolulu and beyond O‘ahu. Incumbents and challengers with different ideas sat down at the same table, engaging in some interesting, vigorous and respectful discussions.

 

Viewers could feel the fresh breeze of democracy. At its best, this civil discourse provided much-needed substance and helped voters make their choice at the polls.

 

As Communications Professor John Hart of Hawai‘i Pacific University commented in a Honolulu Civil Beat podcast with reporter Chad Blair last October 10: “I still believe [debates] are our best chance to see past the pseudo-events, the slick advertisements. When you hear someone talk for an hour, you get a sense of who they are.”

 

This public media organization wants to thank all of the election candidates who accepted our invitation to inform voters by answering viewer questions and taking part in civil discourse on Insights on PBS Hawai‘i.

 

A hui hou (until next time)…
Leslie signature

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
What Happens to Hawai‘i Elders Who Don’t Have a Personal Safety Net?

 


Whether it’s job loss, illness, divorce or other life circumstances, some islanders find themselves at wit’s end, running out of money in retirement. What options do they have? And how are Hawai‘i taxpayers affected? What happens to Hawai‘i elders who don’t have a personal safety net?

 

Your questions and comments are welcome via phone, email and via Twitter during the Live Broadcast.

 

Phone Lines:
973-1000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

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