Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School

HIKI NŌ 5|14|20:
Student Reflections on COVID-19, Part Two

 

HIKI NŌ continues its series of reflections on how COVID-19 has changed students’ lives as they shelter-in-place from their homes. Jimmy Liu, a junior and international student at Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy on Hawaiʻi Island, recorded his reflection while sheltering in his home in Shanghai, China. He reports that the situation in his home city is much better now than it was during the peak of China’s coronavirus crisis and even shares footage of the streets of Shanghai today.

 

Other student correspondents who share their reflections in this episode include: Kailea Tuitele, an 8th grader at Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School; Anijah-Rose Tomacder, a senior at Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi; Paul Espiritu, a junior at Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island; Isabella Rodriguez, a 6th grader at Ewa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu; and Naomi Toki, a senior at Waimea High School on Kauaʻi. Topics range from a student who takes on new responsibilities at home because her parents are essential workers to a father who does magic tricks to keep his children occupied during the lockdown to a student who takes care of his aunt’s children while she is out at her nursing job.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

Students from Waiʻanae Intermediate School on Oʻahu tell the story of a robotics teacher who knew almost nothing about robotics when he took over the class but empowered his students to grow the program along with him; a student at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui presents an expressionist personal narrative about her struggle with depression; and students from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu reveal the history and meaning behind lei-giving in a short documentary that won a Student Television Network Excellence Award.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 2|27|20:
2020 Winter Challenge Middle School Division | Program

 

This special edition features stories from the Middle School division of the 2020 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge.  On January 31, 2020, participating elementary, middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the prompt: “The wisdom of elders brought to life by the young.”   Teachers could not provide hands-on help.  The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own.  The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?
 
2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?
 
3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, First-Place, Second-Place, Third-Place, and Honorable Mention awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. The following Middle School Division awardees will be featured in this special:

 

–First Place in the Middle School Division:

 

“Misfit Martial Arts Instructor”
The challenge team from ʻEwa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu tells the story of a martial arts instructor who passes down to his students life lessons he’s learned during his rocky youth.

 

–Second Place in the Middle School Division:

 

“Piano Teacher”
The challenge team from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School tells the story ofa grandmother who has taught piano to two generations of her family, as well as scores of other Maui residents.

 

–Third Place in the Middle School Division:

 

“Coach Jensen”
The challenge team from Waiākea Elementary School on Hawaiʻi Island tells the story of a baseball stand-out who, because of his short stature, channeled his passion for the sport from playing to coaching.  Because there is not a separate elementary school division for HIKI NŌ challenges, elementary schools compete in the Middle School Division.  This is the first time an elementary school has placed in a HIKI NŌ Challenge.

 

–Honorable Mention in the Middle School Division:

 

”Ongaeshi: Giving Back”

 

The challenge team from Highlands Intermediate School on Oʻahu tells the story of a judo sensei who is passing his knowledge of this form of martial art to his children.

 

HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge stories from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui,Kealakehe Intermediate School in Kona, and Kapaʻa Middle School on Kauaʻi are also featured.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 2|20|20:
John Rao and Other Stories | Program

 

TOP STORY

 

“John Rao”
Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on the island of Kauaʻi tell the story of a man who slowly turned his life around as the result of a spiritual awakening.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Young Cartographer”
Students from Hongwanji Mission School in Nuʻuanu Valley on Oʻahu tell the story of a young cartographer who creates imaginative worlds through hand-drawn maps.

 

“How to Make Jewelry from Magazines”
Students from Roosevelt High School on Oʻahu show us a crafty way of making bracelets from old magazines.

 

“Vibrant Hawaiʻi”
Students from Waiākea Elementary School on the Big Island tell the story of a financially struggling, single mother and a visionary community movement that hopes to solve the island’s poverty epidemic.

 

“Hygiene Products for the Homeless”
Students from Aliamanu Middle School on the island of Oʻahu tell the story of middle school students who organized a hygiene drive to help address a prevalent health issue affecting the homeless.

 

“Chef to the Homeless”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani tell the story of a chef whose compassion for the disadvantaged led him to work at a homeless shelter.

 

Students from Ewa Makai Middle School host this episode of HIKI NŌ from their campus in Ewa Beach, Oʻahu.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 2|13|20: A Son’s Love and Other Stories | Program

 

TOP STORY

 

“A Sonʻs Love”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului, Maui, tell the story of a single mother who hits rock bottom after suffering from a series of emotional and physical ailments. Through the love and support of her son, she eventually learns how to enjoy her new life and look to the future.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Lucky Bees”
Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School on the Valley Isle tell the story of a passionate Kīhei beekeeper who aims to protect the island’s native bee population from dangers afflicting bee colonies around the world.

 

“Okinawan Connection”
Students from Kalāheo High School from the Kailua district of Oʻahu tell the story of Hawaiʻi Okinawans who sent 550 pigs to revitalize pig farming and bring normalcy to an Okinawa devastated by World War II.

 

“How to De-Stress”
Students from Hilo Intermediate School on the Big Island show us three tips on how to “put stress to rest” in our ever-busy world.

 

“Heart of Gold”
Students from Moanalua High School on the island of Oʻahu tell the story of a bubbly woman who believes in living every day to its fullest while working hard to take care of her Alzheimer’s-afflicted mother.

 

Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School host this episode of HIKI NŌ from their campus in Pukalani, Maui.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 12|5|19: 2019-2020 Student Television Network Challenge

 

This special edition features stories created by HIKI NŌ students that were submitted to the national Student Television Network (STN) competition in the News Feature category.  Participating student teams were given six days to conceptualize, organize, shoot, write and edit a story based on a particular theme, which was not announced until the beginning of the six-day production window.  The theme for this challenge was: Role Models.

 

TOP STORY

 

“For You”
Students from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu tell the story of Lexton Butay-Joseph, a Waiʻanae High School senior whose uncle and role model passed away under tragic circumstances.  Lexton had never been close with his father, but through their shared grief over Lextonʻs uncle (his fatherʻs brother), a bond between father and son has been forged.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Young Champion”
Students from Waiʻanae Intermediate School in West Oʻahu tell the story of Logyn Lynn Puahala, a nine-year-old female judo champion who serves as a role model to her best friend and fellow judo student Eli Oshiro.  The story also features Logynʻs judo coach and role model, her father Robin Puahala.

 

“Period Hawaiʻi”
Students from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu tell the story of Courtney Coleman, the lead organizer of Period Hawaiʻi.  Courtney was inspired to take on this position by Nadya Okimoto, the founder of the national Period Movement. Period Hawaiʻi fights for access to menstrual hygiene products for all Hawaiʻi women (whether they be homeless, incarcerated or otherwise unable to afford the products).

 

“Uncle Russell”
Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi tell the story of a Kauaʻi man who has become a role model to many because of his volunteer work for the Foodbank and for teaching water sports to handicapped children and adults.

 

“Mana Wahine”
Students from ʻEwa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu tell the story of Alexis Akiona, a young fashion designer who looks to her mother as her role model.  Alexis credits her mother for teaching her how to be a strong woman, or mana wahine.

 

“Role Model Teacher/Dad”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani tell the story of an elementary school teacher who straddles his dual life as a role model for his students and for his offspring.

 

“Homecoming”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young woman who was once trapped in the foster care system and is now paying it forward by helping children who are going through the same hardship.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 11|14|19:
The Effects of Deployment on Families and Other Stories

 

TOP STORY

 

“The Effects of Deployment on Families”
Students from Aliamanu Middle School in the Salt Lake district of Oʻahu explore the effects of military deployment on family members. The story focuses on how the impact of a parent’s deployment can be more problematic for younger children than it is with their older siblings.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Shy Girl”
Students from Hilo High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a severely shy female Hilo High student who came out of her shell after she found her niche in her schoolʻs media club.

 

“Miss Filipina Kauaʻi”
Kauaʻi High School Class of 2019 graduate Tiffany Sagucio gives a first-person account of her experience as a contestant in the 2019 Miss Filipina Kauaʻi Pageant. Tiffany produced this story as part of her Gwen Ifill Fellowship for young journalists, named after the iconic PBS NewsHour anchor who passed away from cancer in 2016.

 

“Raised Crosswalks”
Students from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu tell the story of a new pedestrian protection measure launched on Farrington Highway in Waiʻanae—raised crosswalks.

 

“Fishing Line Recycling”
Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui report on an effort to reduce the amount of harmful fishing line discarded into our oceans.

 

“Poi Mill”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School show us how Native Hawaiian students are learning about their culture through the cultivation and presentation of taro.

 

“Kinai ʻEha”
Students at Kalāheo High School in Windward Oʻahu introduce us to a non-profit organization that provides workforce training for young people who are homeless, incarcerated or just looking for guidance.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 11|21|19:
2019 Fall Challenge

 

This special edition features stories from the 2019 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge.  On October 18, 2019, participating elementary, middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the prompt: “Half of Hawaiʻi’s people are struggling financially even while many work two or three jobs.  Produce a story about a person or group of people who are dealing with this predicament.”   Teachers could not provide hands-on help.  The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own.  The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?

2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?

3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, first-place, second-place and third-place awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. The following awardees will be featured in the special:

 

First Place in the High School Division:

“Chazz’s World”

The challenge team from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tells the story of Chazz—a high school student who has to work at a pizza parlor to help his family pay the bills.  The story explores the stress and other emotional hardships the situation causes for Chazz.

 

First Place in the Middle School Division:

“Working for Love”

The challenge team from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School tells the story of a wife and husband who are both full-time teachers yet have to work additional jobs in order to make ends meet. (She cleans condos and he runs a yard service.)

 

Second Place in the High School Division:

“For the Family”

The challenge team from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu tells the story of a woman who lost her husband to leukemia and must now raise her daughters as a single mother.

 

Second Place in the Middle School Division:

“Hero Mom”

The challenge team from Maui Waena Intermediate School tells the story of a woman who holds down three jobs to support her family and whose dedication and sacrifice has made her a hero in her daughter’s eyes.

 

Third Place in the High School Division:

“Handling Hawaiʻi’s Financial Demands”

The challenge team from Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi tells the story of two young people who perform in a Polynesian revue but also hold down additional jobs to make ends meet.

 

Third Place in the Middle School Division:

“Go Jimmy Go”

The challenge team from Highlands Intermediate School on Oʻahu tells the story of a saxophone player who heads a very successful, nationally touring musical group but who also teaches at Highlands Intermediate to earn enough money to support his family.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 10|24|19:
Archers to Art and Other Stories

 

TOP STORY:

 

“Archers to Art”
Students from Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha Public Charter School on Kauaʻi tell the story of how members of their school’s archery program created, through a process of problem solving, an activity that produces wildly colorful, spontaneous works of art. Student archers decided to place balloons onto the traditional archery targets with the intent of having the arrows burst the balloons. The wind caused the balloons to move around, so the students filled them with water to anchor them in place. They then decided to add paint to the water, and laid cardboard down to avoid messing up the surrounding area. Noticing the colorful designs the splatters created, they replaced the cardboard with watercolor paper. Thus was created this innovative genre of painting.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

“Waimea’s Rain Rock”
Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy Middle School in the Waimea district of Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a legendary rain rock which was said to have saved Waimea from a devastating drought.

 

“Student Poet”
Students from Kauaʻi High School in Līhuʻe tell the story of a young poet who uses creativity to battle depression.

 

“Jiu Jitsu Preacher”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani tell the story of a martial arts school that is also a place of worship.

 

“How to Care for an Abandoned Baby Bird”
Students from Īʻao School on Maui show us how to nurse an abandoned baby bird back to health.

 

“Betty Santoki”
Students from Farrington High School on Oʻahu introduce us to a Class of 1962 Farrington graduate who has dedicated her life to keeping Japanese traditions alive in her community.

 

“Suburbia”
A student at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui shares her inner-most thoughts about becoming a filmmaker in a personal video essay.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Montessori School of Maui in Makawao.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
The 2018 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge – Middle School Division

 

This special edition features stories from the Middle School Division of the 2018 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge. On October 19, 2018, ten participating high school teams and twelve participating middle school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the theme “the story behind the food”. Teachers could not provide hands-on help. The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own. The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

  1. How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?
  2. How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?
  3. How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, first place, second place, third place and honorable mention awards were given in both the high school and middle school divisions.

 

The winning middle school stories featured in this episode are:

 

–First Place: The Fall Challenge team from Waiʻanae Intermediate School in West Oʻahu opened their entry with a meal being prepared. The story behind that meal is that it is being prepared by and for residents of Hope Lodge, a Honolulu facility where families of Neighbor Island cancer patients who are on O‘ahu for treatment can stay.

 

–Second Place: Ewa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu told the story of Ali‘itasi Ponder, the woman behind Aunty’s Lil’ Green Hut, an organic, gluten-free food truck on Oʻahu’s North Shore.

 

–Third Place: Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului profiled an organic farmer on Maui.

 

–Honorable Mention: Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School featured two women who met in college and went on to open a baking business together.

 

Also featured:

 

–Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i highlighted Kunana Dairy, which specializes in goat’s milk products.

 

–Volcano School of Arts and Sciences on Hawaiʻi Island introduced us to the family behind Dimple Cheek Farm and Café.

 

–Hongwanji Mission School on Oʻahu featured Kahuku Farms.

 

–Kealakehe Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island told the story of a woman who is inspired to cook by the spirit of her late mother.

 

First place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Second place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Third place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Honorable mention winners will receive $100 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Pedestrian Perils and other stories

HIKI NŌ: Episode #1004 - Pedestrian Perils and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Āliamanu Middle School in the Salt Lake district of Oʻahu re-visit an issue they reported on for HIKI NŌ over six years ago: the pedestrian hazards around their campus and the campus of Āliamanu Elementary School. Most of Salt Lake Boulevard is a four-lane City & County road. But for a one-mile stretch, beginning at the two Āliamanu campuses, the road narrows to two lanes, increasing traffic congestion right in front of the schools. Adding to the problem is the fact that there is a popular shopping center across from the schools, which acts as a lure for students to cross the busy boulevard. In April of 2012, when Āliamanu Middle School’s first report on this subject aired, plans were in place to widen the stretch of Salt Lake Boulevard adjacent to the schools as part of the rail project. Since then, the rail route has shifted from Salt Lake to the airport, and the Salt Lake Boulevard widening project has fallen to the wayside. The original 2012 story will also be aired to provide context for the current story and to show how little has been done about the problem in the ensuing six years.

 

Program

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Kalani High School in east Oʻahu show us how to get something we all need: a better night’s sleep.

 

–Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy in the Waimea district of Hawaiʻi Island give us the ins and outs of their keiki triathlon.

 

–Students from Sacred Hearts Academy on Oʻahu explore how their generation feels about ecology and the environment.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Upcountry Maui tell the story of an Alabama transplant who marches to the beat of a different drum.

 

–Students from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu take us to the last remaining dairy farm on Oʻahu.

 

–Students from ʻEwa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu profile a young woman who uses dance to hold her life together.

 

 

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