Kauai High School

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 913: 2018 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge

 

On Friday January 26, 2018, student teams from twenty middle and high schools took on the 2018 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge. The students had four days to conceptualize, shoot, write, record voiceovers for, and edit a story expressing the theme “A Special Place.” Teachers were allowed to make suggestions to their students, but they were not allowed to provide any hands-on help (no shooting, sound recording, writing, or editing). The theme was announced at the beginning of the four-day challenge, so no pre-planning was possible before then.

 

Eight of the best stories from the challenge will be featured:

 

–“Shige’s Saimin Stand” by Moanalua High School (O‘ahu)

Inspired by childhood memories of his grandparent’s saimin stand in Haleiwa, Ross Shigeoka opened Shige’s Saimin Stand twenty-eight years ago in Wahiawa. It has since developed into a home for members of the community to gather and carry out the traditions of enjoying Shige’s homemade saimin and hamburgers. What started out as a business has become a focal point for families from Wahiawa and beyond.

 

–“Taro Farming” by Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School (Maui)

Hōkūao Pellegrino of Nohū‘ano Farms dedicates his life to restoring ancient taro patches that his family began cultivating in Waikapū, Maui back in the 16th century. He hosts approximately one thousand students every year to teach them about the relevance of kalo in the Hawaiian culture and how to mālama (care for) the natural resources that provide for this important crop.

 

–“Cafeteria” by Nānākuli High and Intermediate School (O‘ahu)

The story of how the cafeteria at Nānākuli High and Intermediate School doubles as the home of the Nānākuli Performing Arts Company (NPAC), an organization that transforms lives by providing a sense of family, self-esteem and pride for its performers, mentors, alumni and audience members.

 

–“A Special Piece of Home” by Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i)

A personal essay featuring a high school graduate about to head off to college on the mainland who reflects on the things she will miss about her island home of Kaua‘i.

 

–“Volcanoes National Park” by Volcano School of Arts & Science (Hawai‘i Island)

A young man talks about the stories of Hawaiian gods and goddesses he has learned at Volcanoes National Park, which has sparked his curiosity to learn more about the Hawaiian culture. He also reflects on the incredible natural beauty he has experienced at the park, particularly around Halema‘uma‘u Crater.

 

–“Agnes’ Portuguese Bake Shop” by Kalaheo High School (O‘ahu)

Agnes’ Portuguese Bake Shop has been a Kailua gathering place for forty-seven years. Longtime patrons reminisce about what the bake shop has meant to them as, sadly, it prepares to close its doors for good.

 

–“Affordable Housing” by Maui Waena Intermediate School (Maui)

The Lokahi Foundation, a non-profit housing and community development organization, has just completed a development of affordable homes in the Happy Valley area of Wailuku, Maui. As the new homeowners move in, these individual “special places” come together to form a neighborhood of people bound together by the shared desire to create safe, happy homes for their families.

(Middle School winner of the 2018 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge)

 

–“Teen Parent Center” by Maui High School (Maui)

While attending Baldwin High School, fifteen year-old Jada Apolo became a teen mother. The responsibilities of motherhood made continuing high school close to impossible, until she transferred to Maui High School, one of three public schools in Hawai‘i to offer on-campus childcare and a teen parent program. This enabled Jada to continue with high school, but a recent spike in the number of incoming freshman caused a shortage of resources that threatened to close Maui High’s teen parent program. Jada launched a community awareness/support campaign that she hopes will lead to funding for an alternative teen parent program for her and other teen moms in the area.

(High School winner of the 2018 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge)

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 912: Top Story – Inspirational teacher Emma Erwin

 

TOP STORY
Students from Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island tell the personal and inspirational story of one of their teachers. Emma Erwin hiked all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail – from Mexico to Canada – as part of her recovery from the trauma of sexual assault. She hiked by herself, taking on the challenge as a way to take back control of her body and her life. Ms. Erwin speaks candidly and shares photos from her remarkable journey.

 

ALSO FEATURED
–Students from Kaua‘i’s Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School in Lihu‘e take us to “Critter Camp,” sponsored by the Kaua‘i Humane Society. These day camps teach children how to get along with animals and take care of them, while having fun with their new four-legged friends.

 

–Students from Waimea High School on Kaua‘i invite us into Unko’s Kitchen, a popular restaurant in Hanapepe. In this busy kitchen we find out how and why Chef Manuel Cabral prepares the local comfort food that keeps residents and tourists coming back year after year.

 

–Students from Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui show us the step-by-step instructions to sew on a button.

 

–Students from Aliamanu Middle School on O‘ahu make the most of their Pearl Harbor location to report this story connecting history to their own lives. Aliamanu students had the opportunity to meet young “Ambassadors of Peace” from Australia, Japan and the U.S. who are using lessons of the past to promote a peaceful future.

 

–Students from Kaua‘i High School in Lihu‘e share the story of a Filipino immigrant from a first-person perspective. Glenn Marcos explains the challenges and rewards of starting his new life on Kaua‘i.

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului introduce us to a family learning to embrace what life brings after their baby is born with Down Syndrome. Elias and Stephanie Garcia of Pukalani are also using their family company – Aloha Kettlecorn – to share their blessings and inspire their neighbors.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 911: Focus On Compassion: Self-Identity, Crystal Cebedo update

 

This episode is an encore presentation of a HIKI NŌ special that first aired in the summer of 2017– HIKI NŌ Focus On Compassion: Self-Identity –hosted and co-written by HIKI NŌ alumna and Wai‘anae High School graduate Crystal Cebedo. This encore presentation includes a brief update on Crystal, who is majoring in Marketing and Human Resources at Menlo College in Atherton, California on a full scholarship.

 

The HIKI NŌ stories in this special look at compassion for self-identity in terms of culture, gender, body image, ethnicity, or appearance. They include:

 

“Calcee Nance” from Kaua‘i High School on Kaua‘i: the story of a teen mentor at the Boys and Girls Club whose instinct to nurture and feed others was inspired by her relationship with her late mother.

 

“Kimberly Yap” from Lahainaluna High School on Maui: the story of a young woman whose decisions about her future are complicated by her multicultural identity as a half Filipina, half Micronesian born in Kiribati and raised on Maui.

 

“Mark Yamanaka” from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu: a feature on Mark Yamanaka, a Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award-winning musician, who overcame internal conflicts about being a non-Hawaiian playing Hawaiian music. He has since been embraced by the Hawaiian music community for his commitment to learning and singing in the Hawaiian language and his skillful guitar playing.

 

“Cosplay” from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island: a look at how cosplay – dressing up as characters from books, movies, or your own imagination – gave a group of high school students the freedom to express their true selves in a creative and fun way.

 

“Body Image” from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: a look at how the images of females onscreen and in magazines had a negative impact on one girl’s self-image and self-confidence.

 

“Through Rachel’s Camera” from ‘Iolani School on O‘ahu: the story of a young woman who uses her camera and art to combat traditional gender stereotypes and to express her identity as a feminist and activist.

 

“Pride and Diversity” from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu: a feature on how the Honolulu Pride Parade and Festival helps support and encourage LGBTQ youth who often don’t see themselves reflected in their school or local communities.

 

“Aurora’s Story” from Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu: a look at how one teacher uses her experience with trichotillomania, an impulse disorder that results in her pulling out her hair, to teach her students about self-acceptance.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 907 – 2017/2018 Fall Semester Compilation

 

This special compilation show features some of the top stories from the Fall Semester of the 2017/2018 school year. In all of the selected stories, HIKI NŌ students explore the truth about the people they are featuring.

 

TOP STORY
Students from Moanalua High School in the Salt Lake district of O‘ahu profile Perry “Mooch” Fernandez, a surf instructor headquartered at the “Bowls” break near Ala Moana Beach Park. Halfway through the story, it is revealed that “Mooch”, having separated from his wife, lives out of his van. He not only survives, he thrives – through exchanges of kindnesses with the close-knit community of surfers who consider him a fixture, a mentor, and the center of their lives at “Bowls.”

 

ALSO FEATURED
–Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a Maui Waena Intermediate School student who does not let his disability, caused by a genetic spinal condition, hold him back from pursuing sports, music and all the joys of life.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a woman who discovered her truth through her life-long commitment to dance.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle tell the story of wheelchair-bound school counselor who, after his debilitating diving accident, found his truth by connecting to a Higher Power.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu tell the story of a high school student who finds his truth in his aspiration to carry on his parent’s pig farming business.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i discover the truth of how a Vietnam War veteran copes with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i show how a video about a special-needs elementary school student produced by a classmate led to a greater understanding and acceptance by the student’s peers.

 

–Students from Kaua‘i High School in Lihu‘e express their concerns about their generation’s over-reliance on screens to see and experience the world around them.

 

This special compilation show is hosted by Brooke Kanna and Haven Luper-Jasso, two HIKI NŌ students from Kaua‘i High School who were among the students that participated in PBS Hawai‘i’s live town hall special KĀKOU: Have You Fact-checked Your Truth?

 

This program encores Saturday, Dec. 2, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Dec. 3, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode #903 – Young Pig Farmer

 

TOP STORY

Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu tell the story of Matthew Reyes Jr., an enterprising young pig farmer who helps his parent run Reyes’ Hog Farm in Ma‘ili. Matthew is so dedicated to his family’s business that he sacrifices any semblance of a social life. All of his waking hours are taken up by attending high school and working on the pig farm. Through this dedication, he has developed an in- depth knowledge of the pig farming business and a great sense of pride in his profession. He does want to study business once he gets to college because he feels it will give him an edge in this very competitive industry.

 

ALSO FEATURED

–Students from Waīakea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island introduce us to a high school track star who, through the friendship and camaraderie she developed with her teammates and coaches, learned to love a sport she once dreaded.

 

–Students from Kalama Intermediate School in Makawao, Maui, feature a Hawaiian Immersion teacher who connects to her culture by painting words that express its values.

 

–Students from ‘Ilima Intermediate School in ‘Ewa, O‘ahu, tell the story of a young French horn player who learns about herself in the process of learning the music.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle introduce us to a wheelchair-bound school counselor who sees challenges not as obstacles, but as a way to grow.

 

–Students from Kaua‘i High School in Līhu‘e tell the story of young Thai immigrants who learn the value of hard work in Hawai‘i’s fast food industry.

 

–Students from Pacific Buddhist Academy present a primer on the ancient Japanese martial art of kendo.

 

This program encores Saturday, Oct. 28, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Oct. 29, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode #901 – The Bigger Picture

 

TOP STORY

Students from Kaua‘i High School in Lihue present a personal essay called “The Bigger Picture.” It bemoans how smartphones and other personal electronic devises get in the way of our enjoyment of the natural world around us. The widespread use of smartphone cameras has led people to experience life within the confines of a small screen rather than directly, with their own eyes. “Our phones distract us from the real beauty right in front of us,” says the narrator, “which makes each minute less memorable.”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

–Students from McKinley High School in Honolulu show how a massive art project created a common bond among the employees of a Waikiki hotel.

 

–Young journalists at Wheeler Middle School in Central O‘ahu show how actions taken by students led to the administration extending the time between periods to ensure students have enough time to walk from class to class.

 

–Students from Hana School in East Maui show us how to make a fish ornament out of coconut fronds.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle show how a man’s participation in a community band enriches his life, even though it has been more than twenty years since he played in his high school orchestra.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i uncover the massive clean-up effort along their island’s Kalalau hiking trail.

 

–Students from H.P. Baldwin High School in Wailuku, Maui, tell the story of a young woman who was inspired to reveal the real person behind her make-up.

 

This program encores Saturday, Oct. 14, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Oct. 15, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 


HIKI NŌ
Focus on Compassion: Self-Identity

 

The third of four Focus on Compassion HIKI NŌ episodes compiles archived stories that center on the theme of compassion for self-identity. This four-episode series is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ and Wai‘anae High School graduate who is currently attending Menlo College in Atherton, California. The stories in this episode look specifically at compassion for self-identity in terms of culture, gender, body image, ethnicity, or appearance.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this Focus on Compassion show include:

 

“Calcee Nance” from Kaua‘i High School on Kaua‘i: the story of a teen mentor at the Boys and Girls Club whose instinct to nurture and feed others was inspired by her relationship with her late mother.

 

“Kimberly Yap” from Lahainaluna High School on Maui: the story of a young woman whose decisions about her future are complicated by her multicultural identity as a half-Filipina, half-Micronesian born in Kiribati and raised on Maui.

 

“Mark Yamanaka” from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu: a feature on Mark Yamanaka, a Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award-winning musician, who overcame internal conflicts about being a non-Hawaiian playing Hawaiian music. He has since been embraced by the Hawaiian music community for his commitment to learning and singing in the Hawaiian language and his skillful guitar playing.

 

“Cosplay” from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island: a look at how cosplay – dressing up as characters from books, movies, or your own imagination – gave a group of high school students the freedom to express their true selves in a creative and fun way.

 

“Body Image” from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: a look at how the images of females onscreen and in magazines had a negative impact on one girl’s self-image and self-confidence.

 

“Through Rachel’s Camera” from ‘Iolani School on O‘ahu: the story of a young woman who uses her camera and art to combat traditional gender stereotypes and to express her identity as a feminist and activist.

 

“Pride and Diversity” from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu: a feature on how the Honolulu Pride Parade and Festival helps support and encourage LGBTQ youth who often don’t see themselves reflected in their school or local communities.

 

“Aurora’s Story” from Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu: a look at how one teacher uses her experience with trichotillomania, an impulse disorder that results in her pulling out her hair, to teach her students about self-acceptance.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 23, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 24, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode #819

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Kapolei High School on O‘ahu present a story on the Hawai‘i-themed artwork engraved on the columns of O‘ahu’s rail project. The column art was designed by local architect Daniel Kanekuni and, according to HART spokesperson Bill Brennan, adds a sense of place and local identity to the rail project. Rail proponents and opponents alike feel that the column artwork is a good thing. However, some rail opponents, such as UH Professor of Civil Engineering Panos Prevedouros, feel that the real eye-sore will be the elevated rail stations. Says Prevedouros, “How much lipstick do they think they can put on that pig?”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School show how a Kahului family’s mochi- pounding tradition continues, despite the recent loss of the family matriarch who had been the heart of the event.

 

–Students from Hawai‘i Technology Academy in Leeward O‘ahu show us the proper way to pack a military care package.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island profile a Konawaena graduate who went on to form the internationally renowned heavy metal reggae band Pepper.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu profile a lesbian couple at their school who work to spread the joy of diversity and the message of tolerance for those who are different.

 

–Students from Maui High School profile a star athlete who had to sit out the football season because of a heart condition but continued to inspire his teammates by volunteering as an assistant coach.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 27, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, May 28, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode #818

 

TOP STORY
Students from Kaua‘i High School in Lihu‘e introduce a new story genre to HIKI NŌ: the Personal Essay. In her essay “The Fact of You,” Kaua‘i High School student Haven Luper-Jasso explores the nature of truth. It opens with her thoughts on the matter: “The word FACT can be defined as a true piece of information. And in our day and age where information and messages are bombarding us from every angle every second of the day, that’s all we really want in life: truth.”

 

She goes on to explore not just the nature of factual truth, but also the truth within one’s own self: “Your life is the greatest masterpiece you will ever produce…Let it be genuine, true to who you are. Because that is who you were created to be. And that is a fact I can guarantee with a hundred percent certainty.”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Waipahu High School on O‘ahu explore the mysterious origins of their studentbody-wide cheering tradition known as the Arthur Awards.

 

–Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu uncover the caring person behind the tough façade of their vice principal.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of Team Unify, a non-profit organization that helps students without disabilities bond with students who have disabilities.

 

–Students from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu introduce us to two local fashion designers who give younger, up-and-coming designers hands-on experience in the fashion business.

 

–Ka‘ala Elementary School on O‘ahu makes its HIKI NŌ debut with a video primer on aquaponics. (Ka‘ala Elementary School is only the second elementary school to produce for HIKI NŌ. The first was Kainalu Elementary School in windward O‘ahu.)

 

This program encores Saturday, April 8, at 12:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #813 – Best Achievement in Cinematography and Editing

 

The fifth in a series of seven 2017 HIKI NŌ Award nominee shows highlights the nominees for:

 

–Best Franchise Piece (Hana K-12 School on Maui, Kalani High School on O‘ahu, Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i, Kaua‘i High School, Moloka‘i High School, Pacific Buddhist Academy on O‘ahu);

 

–Best Factoid (Hana K-12 School on Maui, Hawai‘i Preparatory Academy on Hawai‘i Island; Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island, Mililani High School on O‘ahu, McKinley High School on O‘ahu);

 

–Best Achievement in Cinematography and Editing (Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i, Maui High School, Moanalua High School on O‘ahu, Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu, and Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu).

 

This episode is hosted by Alyssa Ryhn from Castle High School (O‘ahu) and Desiree Kanui from Nanakuli Intermediate School (O‘ahu).

 

This program encores Saturday, Feb. 25 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Feb. 26 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



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