Maui

HIKI NŌ
Episode #903

HIKI NŌ: Episode #903

 

TOP STORY

Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu tell the story of Matthew Reyes Jr., an enterprising young pig farmer who helps his parent run Reyes’ Hog Farm in Ma‘ili. Matthew is so dedicated to his family’s business that he sacrifices any semblance of a social life. All of his waking hours are taken up by attending high school and working on the pig farm. Through this dedication, he has developed an in- depth knowledge of the pig farming business and a great sense of pride in his profession. He does want to study business once he gets to college because he feels it will give him an edge in this very competitive industry.

 

ALSO FEATURED

–Students from Waīakea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island introduce us to a high school track star who, through the friendship and camaraderie she developed with her teammates and coaches, learned to love a sport she once dreaded.

 

–Students from Kalama Intermediate School in Makawao, Maui, feature a Hawaiian Immersion teacher who connects to her culture by painting words that express its values.

 

–Students from ‘Ilima Intermediate School in ‘Ewa, O‘ahu, tell the story of a young French horn player who learns about herself in the process of learning the music.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle introduce us to a wheelchair-bound school counselor who sees challenges not as obstacles, but as a way to grow.

 

–Students from Kaua‘i High School in Līhu‘e tell the story of young Thai immigrants who learn the value of hard work in Hawai‘i’s fast food industry.

 

–Students from Pacific Buddhist Academy present a primer on the ancient Japanese martial art of kendo.

 

This program encores Saturday, Oct. 28, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Oct. 29, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #901 – The Bigger Picture

 

TOP STORY
Students from Kaua‘i High School in Lihue present a personal essay called “The Bigger Picture.” It bemoans how smartphones and other personal electronic devises get in the way of our enjoyment of the natural world around us. The widespread use of smartphone cameras has led people to experience life within the confines of a small screen rather than directly, with their own eyes. “Our phones distract us from the real beauty right in front of us,” says the narrator, “which makes each minute less memorable.”

 

ALSO FEATURED:
–Students from McKinley High School in Honolulu show how a massive art project created a common bond among the employees of a Waikiki hotel.

 

–Young journalists at Wheeler Middle School in Central O‘ahu show how actions taken by students led to the administration extending the time between periods to ensure students have enough time to walk from class to class.

 

–Students from Hana School in East Maui show us how to make a fish ornament out of coconut fronds.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle show how a man’s participation in a community band enriches his life, even though it has been more than twenty years since he played in his high school orchestra.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i uncover the massive clean-up effort along their island’s Kalalau hiking trail.

 

–Students from H.P. Baldwin High School in Wailuku, Maui, tell the story of a young woman who was inspired to reveal the real person behind her make-up.

 

This program encores Saturday, Oct. 14, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Oct. 15, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 


HIKI NŌ
Focus on Compassion: Animals

 

The final installment of the four-part Focus on Compassion HIKI NŌ series focuses on peoples’ compassion toward animals, including house pets, working pets, exotic animals and endangered species. Like the previous three shows, this episode is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ and Wai‘anae High School graduate who is currently attending Menlo College in Atherton, California.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this Focus on Compassion show include:

 

–“Dog Adoption” from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i: a look at a creative program initiated by the Kaua‘i Humane Society to promote dog adoptions through visitors taking the animals on nearby field trips.

 

–“Towards No More Homeless Pets” from Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui: a feature on the spay/neuter clinic conducted by the Maui Humane Society to compassionately address and prevent the overpopulation of homeless cats on the island.

 

–“Three Ring Ranch” from Kealakehe High School on the island of Hawai‘i: the story of how one woman’s life work to protect and educate about exotic animals was inspired by the animals who helped her recover from a debilitating accident.

 

–“Passion for Service” from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui: the story of a young woman who spent almost half her life volunteering at Assistance Dogs of Hawaii, a program that trains dogs to assist people with special needs.

 

–“Wounded Warriors” from Waialua High and Intermediate School on O‘ahu: a feature on the work of Hawaii Fi-do, an organization that trains service companion dogs, and the positive impact one of their companion dogs had on a Schofield soldier in the Wounded Warrior Project.

 

–“Nene” from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i: a look at the multi- state agency project of removing a flock of nene, Hawai‘i’s state bird, nesting on Kaua‘i Lagoon between the two runways at Līhu‘e Airport to a safer location for the birds and the public.

 

–“Mālama NOAA” from Āliamanu Middle School on O‘ahu: a feature on the efforts of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to protect and preserve the endangered Hawaiian monk seal population through medical care of sick or injured seals, the enforcement of laws, and through community education.

 

–“Hokulani” from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu: the story of a Pomeranian that spreads joy wherever it goes.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 30, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Oct. 1, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Focus on Compassion: Self-Identity

 

The third of four Focus on Compassion HIKI NŌ episodes compiles archived stories that center on the theme of compassion for self-identity. This four-episode series is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ and Wai‘anae High School graduate who is currently attending Menlo College in Atherton, California. The stories in this episode look specifically at compassion for self-identity in terms of culture, gender, body image, ethnicity, or appearance.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this Focus on Compassion show include:

 

“Calcee Nance” from Kaua‘i High School on Kaua‘i: the story of a teen mentor at the Boys and Girls Club whose instinct to nurture and feed others was inspired by her relationship with her late mother.

 

“Kimberly Yap” from Lahainaluna High School on Maui: the story of a young woman whose decisions about her future are complicated by her multicultural identity as a half-Filipina, half-Micronesian born in Kiribati and raised on Maui.

 

“Mark Yamanaka” from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu: a feature on Mark Yamanaka, a Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award-winning musician, who overcame internal conflicts about being a non-Hawaiian playing Hawaiian music. He has since been embraced by the Hawaiian music community for his commitment to learning and singing in the Hawaiian language and his skillful guitar playing.

 

“Cosplay” from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island: a look at how cosplay – dressing up as characters from books, movies, or your own imagination – gave a group of high school students the freedom to express their true selves in a creative and fun way.

 

“Body Image” from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: a look at how the images of females onscreen and in magazines had a negative impact on one girl’s self-image and self-confidence.

 

“Through Rachel’s Camera” from ‘Iolani School on O‘ahu: the story of a young woman who uses her camera and art to combat traditional gender stereotypes and to express her identity as a feminist and activist.

 

“Pride and Diversity” from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu: a feature on how the Honolulu Pride Parade and Festival helps support and encourage LGBTQ youth who often don’t see themselves reflected in their school or local communities.

 

“Aurora’s Story” from Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu: a look at how one teacher uses her experience with trichotillomania, an impulse disorder that results in her pulling out her hair, to teach her students about self-acceptance.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 23, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 24, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Focus on Compassion: Parents and Children

 

The second of four in a special HIKI NŌ Focus on Compassion series emphasizes the unique and sometimes misunderstood relationship between parent and child. This four-episode series is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ and Wai‘anae High School graduate in her second year at Menlo College in Atherton, California.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this Focus on Compassion show include:

 

–“Father Coach” from Hongwanji Mission School on O‘ahu: the story of a father and son whose bond and mutual respect developed and deepened through their additional roles as coach and player.

 

–“Parental Guidance Required” from Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu: a look at how the tough love of a parent has sharpened one student wrestler’s competitive spirit and prepared her with the skills and mindset for life outside the ring.

 

–“Racing Sakamotos” from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i: the story of how a father’s passion for drag racing passed down to his children and united the entire family around the discipline and detail of this exhilarating sport.

 

–“Lucy’s Lab Creamery” from Saint Francis School on O‘ahu: the story of a young entrepreneur who uses his ice cream parlor to simultaneously honor the memory of his late mother and raise money for charity.

 

–“The Comedy of Life” from Maui High School on Maui: a look at the mental and emotional adjustments made as a daughter becomes the caretaker of her mother with Alzheimer’s.

 

–“Silent Passion” from Nanakuli High and Intermediate School on O‘ahu: the story of a mother, who despite her inability to hear, enthusiastically supports her son’s passion for singing, dancing and theater.

 

–“Anti-Meth Teen” from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui: the story of a teen whose father’s past addiction inspired her volunteerism and gave her a platform for helping her peers rise above difficult circumstances.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 16, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 17, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Focus on Compassion: Kūpuna

 

The first of four Focus on Compassion HIKI NŌ episodes drawn from the archives compiles stories that center on the topic of kūpuna, or elders. This show is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ and Wai‘anae High School graduate who is currently attending Menlo College in Atherton, California on a full scholarship. In this episode, the stories highlight the compassion we feel towards our elders or the compassion our kūpuna show us.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this Focus on Compassion show include:

 

–“Elder-Student Talk” from Aliamanu Middle School on O‘ahu: a look at the wisdom shared by The Elders, a group of former global leaders, to Hawaii’s youth and young adults at the Pillars of Peace Conference.

 

–“Papa Fu” from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i: the story of a 101-year old man and the lessons he’s learned and shares from his long life.

 

–“Taro Farmer” from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i: the story of Kinichi Ishikawa, a 98-year-old 442nd Regimental Combat Team veteran and a life-long farmer, who continues to work the land and mentor the next generation of farmers.

 

–“Scam Story” from Kainalu Elementary School on O‘ahu: a cautionary tale of how senior citizens can fall prey to scam artists and advice on how people can avoid this kind of financial exploitation.

 

–“Remember What’s Important” from Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu: a look at how a family is drawn together in their creative and compassionate efforts to care for the family matriarch who has dementia.

 

–“Adult Day Care” from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: a feature on how the Maui Adult Day Care Center addresses the needs of the senior population with a staff committed to the nurture, vitality and personalized care of its clients.

 

–“Losing a Parent” from Hilo High School on Hawai‘i Island: the story of how the love of her grandparents helped stabilize one high school student’s life despite the loss of a parent.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 9, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 10, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #824

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ highlights some of the best stories from the spring quarter of the 2016-2017 school year. The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this compilation show include:

 

“Mochi Pounding” from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui:
The story of a Maui family who continues their annual New Year’s tradition of mochi pounding, despite the recent passing of the family matriarch.

 

“Tough Vice-Principal” from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu:
A classic “don’t judge a book by its cover” story about a vice-principal whose tough exterior belies her heart of gold.

 

“Fashion Entrepreneurs” from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu:
Two Honolulu-based fashion entrepreneurs mentor young local designers who are trying to break into the business.

 

“Tie-Dye Artist” from Kalani High School in East Honolulu:
Inspired by 1960s cultural icons like The Beatles, a Honolulu teenager launches her own line of tie-dye clothing.

 

“Diabetic Athlete” from Waiakea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island:
A star high school athlete faces his toughest opponent off the court: Type 1 Diabetes.

 

“Pedestrian Walking Flags” from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu:
A woman takes it upon herself to sew red flags that are held up by pedestrians as they cross the notoriously dangerous crosswalks in Waiʻanae. The red flags go a long way in alerting drivers that there are pedestrians crossing in front of them.

 

“The Fact of You” from Kaua‘i High School in Lihue:
A personal essay about identifying one’s authentic nature and remaining true to it.

 

“Ukrainian Student” from Nānākuli High and Intermediate School in West O‘ahu:
The story of a foreign exchange student from Ukraine who embraces and reciprocates the Aloha Spirit she finds in Nānākuli.

 

This special compilation show is hosted by Moanalua High School student Camryn Tabiolo, who will be entering her school’s HIKI NŌ program in the fall of 2017.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 2, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 3, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

MOVEABLE FEAST WITH FINE COOKING
The Big Island, Hawai‘i

 

This series combines flavorful ingredients, top chefs and beautiful locations for the ultimate dining experience. In the third season of the Emmy-nominated series, Australian Chef Pete Evans goes coast-to-coast, and across the sea, traveling to Nashville, Louisville, Miami, San Antonio, Hawaii and other US locations to meet the best chefs in each area and cook a delicious meal that incorporates local and seasonal ingredients.

 

Big Island, Hawaii
“The Pied Piper of Hawaii Regional Cuisine,” Chef Peter Merriman takes Pete on a trip up the Kohala Mountains to the beautiful Kahua Ranch where they pick up Wagyu beef for the night’s feast. Meanwhile, local chef Jim Babian sources abalone straight from the tank at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii. Later, the chefs meet up at Merriman’s Restaurant to prepare wood-grilled abalone; pipikaula beef jerky poke; pan-seared kampachi with lilikoi brown butter sauce; and lamb curry with fresh ginger, turmeric, coconut and pineapple-mint garnish.

 

MOVEABLE FEAST WITH FINE COOKING
Maui, Hawai‘i

 

This series combines flavorful ingredients, top chefs and beautiful locations for the ultimate dining experience. In the third season of the Emmy-nominated series, Australian Chef Pete Evans goes coast-to-coast, and across the sea, traveling to Nashville, Louisville, Miami, San Antonio, Hawai‘i and other US locations to meet the best chefs in each area and cook a delicious meal that incorporates local and seasonal ingredients.

 

Maui, Hawai‘i
Pete explores, cooks and dines with two of the island’s excellent chefs, 2014 Maui Chef of the Year Isaac Bancaco, and founder of the mobile kitchen Maui Fresh Streatery Kyle Kawakami. The adventure starts with some off–shore fishing. Back on shore the team prepares a modern take on a traditional Maui feast at the spectacular Noho‘ana Farm known for its taro and poi.

 

Welcome to Our New Board Chair!

Welcome to Our New Board Chair, Jason Fujimoto

PBS Hawai‘i’s new Board Chair Jason Fujimoto

 

He’s the first Neighbor Islander to head the Board of Directors of statewide PBS Hawaiʻi; he is by far our youngest Board Chair; and he’s the fifth generation of a successful family company, founded by an immigrant.

 

Meet Jason Fujimoto of Hilo, 36, husband of Tobie and father of two children. This summer, he succeeded longtime PBS Hawai‘i Board Chair Robbie Alm.

 

In Jason’s “day job,” he serves as President and Chief Operating Officer of HPM Building Supply, overseeing company business on Hawai‘i Island, Maui and Kauaʻi. His role with nonprofit PBS Hawai‘i is unpaid, and he knows what he’s getting into, as he is our Board’s former Vice Chair.

 

“PBS Hawai‘i is really special because it’s not controlled by big media; it’s really Hawai‘i’s TV station, it’s our station,” Jason says.

 

“When you look at the opportunity we have here as an organization, and it goes beyond media, it’s… bringing people of all cultures and professions together and really looking toward the future and solving some of the key issues and problems that we have as a state,” he said.

 

Jason will tell you that he spent his childhood in Hilo, but that he really grew up on Sesame Street. Public television was on the screen in his family home. His parents, Mike and Thuy Fujimoto, and grandparents Robert and Alice Fujimoto, highly value education. They did everything they could to help Jason deepen his knowledge and broaden his horizons.

 

The horizons he chose included the renowned Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. After earning a degree in corporate finance and strategic management, Jason became an investment banker in New York City, working on mergers and acquisitions for J.P. Morgan.

 

Jason had grown wings but he hadn’t forgotten his roots. In 2004, he was ready to return to Hawai‘i, for the chance to do work that was more entrepreneurial and more fulfilling than what Wall Street offered. He found it at his family’s employee-owned company. HPM Building Supply may be best known for its “package home” program, which makes homeownership more affordable.

 

In 2013, Hawaii Business Magazine named Jason Fujimoto as a business person to watch over the years, one of the “20 for the Next 20.”

 

Earlier this year, Jason led our Board and Staff and other stakeholders in envisioning new strategic goals for PBS Hawai‘i. Everyone felt free to speak and share their different ideas. There was civility and humor and, later, a clear consensus. We’re making our video content more accessible, more quickly, in different forms, on different media platforms; and we’re
taking new steps to address financial sustainability in changing times.

 

As CEO, I look forward to working closely with Jason. He places a high value on lifelong learning and integrity, has that old-time Hilo knack for building relationships, and leads from the heart.

 

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