Maui

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I : Quality of Life on Maui

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I presents a series exploring the quality of life on each island, with residents from each island driving the conversations. What issues matter most to each island? These episodes are a precursor to our upcoming Election 2018 coverage. Our Quality of Life series continues with a focus on the community issues that are of most concern for Maui residents.

 

Join us during our live discussion by phoning in, or leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and Facebook Live.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode # 915: Girls Got Grit and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Sacred Hearts Academy, an all-girl school in the Kaimuki district of O‘ahu, tell the story of their school’s professional mentoring program called Girls Got Grit. The program places Sacred Hearts students in professional work places where they are mentored by female staffers. The story follows Sacred Hearts junior Shelby Mattos, who is interning at Hawaii News Now through Girls Got Grit. “Being in Girls Got Grit allows students to enter a professional business environment, and doing that kind of sets a level of expectations for when we enter the workforce,” says Mattos. Other Girls Got Grit internships include Castle Medical Center and Alexander & Baldwin. The program’s director Shelly Kramer says, “I want these girls to come out strong, empowered and feeling that they have a network that they can touch.”

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Hilo Intermediate School on Hawai‘i Island show us how to make a refreshing AND healthy snack: a yogurt parfait.

 

–Students from Mililani Middle School in Central O‘ahu feature Hawai‘i Women in Filmmaking, a nonprofit with a mission of addressing gender inequity in the film and media industry.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a young woman who designs and builds a wheelchair for her disabled dog.

 

–Students from Seabury Hall Middle School in upcountry Maui explore the integral role of mules at Haleakala National Park.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i feature a young woman in the traditionally male role of a Samoan fire knife dancer.

 

–Students from King Intermediate School in Windward O‘ahu tell the story of a female student who fell in love with DJ-ing.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at President William McKinley High School in Honolulu.

 

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Tibetan Illusion Destroyer

 

This film by Maui filmmaker Tom Vendetti documents the Mani Rimdu Festival in Nepal, which originated in Tibet and is still performed in an authentic colorful ceremony in the shadow of Mount Everest. The title refers to the Buddhist concept of destroying man-made illusions that lead to human suffering. Vendetti and renowned Hawaiian musician Keola Beamer were part of a Hawai‘i contingent that journeyed to Nepal to attend the festival. Beamer worked with musicians in Nepal to create the film’s original music.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 921: Compilation of stories from Season 9

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the spring quarter of the 2017-2018 school year. Each of the stories presents an excellent example of an element that is essential to successful dramatic storytelling: change.

 

–Students at Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului tell the story of a former I.T. professional who makes a mid-life career change by returning to his family’s farming roots – but in a modern, 21st century way.

 

–Students at Waia‘nae Intermediate School in West O‘ahu tell the story of a young woman whose desire to join the men’s football team at her school causes people close to her to change their attitudes.

 

–Students at Sacred Hearts Academy in the Kaimukī district of O‘ahu follow the change from student to career professional in a mentoring program known as Girls Got Grit.

 

–Students at Wheeler Middle School in Central O‘ahu show how simple ingredients like flour and glue change into a gooey and creative substance that will keep kids occupied for hours on end.

 

–Students at Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani profile a fitness instructor who helps senior citizens adapt to the physical changes that occur in the aging process.

 

–Students at Dole Middle School in the Kalihi district of O‘ahu highlight a very basic form of change: learning something new. In this case, we learn how to perform a traditional Filipino dance known as the tinikling.

 

–Students from H.P. Baldwin High School in Wailuku, Maui, follow a young man through his grueling recovery after the car he was driving was struck by a drunk driver.

 

–Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu follow the change in a dog as she goes from being homeless to finding her permanent, forever home.

 

This special episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by two aspiring journalists from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu: Shelby Mattos and Rebecca Meyer.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 920: Paula Keele, a wellness educator and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani profile Paula Keele, a wellness educator who teaches a class called enhanced fitness to senior citizens at Kahului Union Church. Ms. Keele started the program because her mother had become debilitated by foregoing the proper physical therapy after she broke her shoulder. “I really want to make sure that seniors stay healthy for as long as possible,” says Keele. Her students, however, seem to be teaching Keele as much as she is teaching them. “My students have taught me patience,” she says. “They’ve taught me kindness. They’ve set really great examples, almost like mentors, on how I can be better as I get older.”

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Seabury Hall Middle School in Upcountry Maui explore the plight of one of the longest surviving species on earth—the sea turtle.

 

–Students from Roosevelt High School in the Makiki district of O‘ahu profile a Japanese immigrant student at Roosevelt who had a hard time fitting in until other students began to respect him for who he is.

 

–Students from Waiākea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island introduce us to a dancer who uses dancing to alleviate the extreme pain she suffers from a rare physical disorder.

 

–Students from Dole Middle School in the Kalihi district of O‘ahu teach us the tinikling, a traditional Filipino dance that has participants jumping in and out between two moving bamboo poles.

 

–Students from Wheeler Middle School on O‘ahu tell the story of a young woman who climbs Mt. Kilimanjaro as a means of healing.

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a deaf cheerleader who refuses to be called disabled and feels she can achieve anything that a hearing person can.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Wallace Rider Farrington High School in the Kalihi district of O‘ahu.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 918: Jerome Ribao and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui trace a fellow student’s road to recovery after he was hit by a drunk driver. In May 2017, Baldwin senior Jerome Ribao suffered a severe leg injury from the accident. Despite this setback, Jerome found ways to remain active. After graduation, Jerome plans to continue to work toward his career goal of becoming an auto mechanic.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Aliamanu Middle School on O‘ahu explore the fears and anxieties faced by students transitioning from elementary to middle school. (From the HIKI NŌ archives.)

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu profile a marching band director who encourages students not to be the best students in the world, but to be the best people for the world. (From the HIKI NŌ archives.)

 

–Students from Waimea High School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a Waimea graduate who became a successful t-shirt artist and returned to his home-town to give back to his community. (From the HIKI NŌ archives.)

 

–Students from Montessori School of Maui in Makawao show how to create a device that will occupy and entertain cats for hours on end.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island show how a sport with origins from Native American Indians is growing in popularity on their island.

 

–And students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a quadriplegic artist who has developed a unique way of painting. (From the HIKI NŌ archives.)

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Kapa‘a Middle School in Līhu‘e, Kaua‘i.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 917: Farmer Larry Yonashiro and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui, profile urban farmer Larry Yonashiro. After a thirty-year career as an I.T. professional, Yonashiro wanted to return to his family’s farming roots (his father worked on a pineapple plantation), but in a modern way. “Agriculture’s been a part of my family for a long time,” says Yonashiro. “I just had it in my blood. I wanted to go back to farming.” So he took up aquaponics, not as a hobby (which is how most aquaponics farmers start) but as an actual commercial farm. With the help of his wife, Patty, and their daughter (who has a background in food science), Yonashiro has joined the thriving sustainable farming movement on Maui.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Punahou School on O‘ahu profile the islands’ youngest beekeeper.

 

–Students from Roosevelt High School on O‘ahu explore a sanctuary for plants native to Hawai‘i.

 

–Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tell the story of a young woman who mends her relationship with her recovered meth-addict father.

 

–Students from Wheeler Middle School on O‘ahu show us how to make a fun and gooey substance known as…SLIME!

 

–Students from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island delve into the fantasy world of cosplay.

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului, Maui, tell the story of a marching band saxophone player who struggles with a degenerative spinal condition.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Kealakehe Intermediate School in the Kona district of Hawai‘i Island.

 

 

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I
Election 2018 Preview

 

Hawai‘i has the distinction of having the lowest voter turnout in the country. Will that track record continue? INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAI‘I previews what’s to come. In November, the people of Hawai‘i will elect a Governor, members of Congress, new Mayors for the counties of Maui and Kaua‘i, County Council members and State Legislators.

 

Join us during our live discussion by phoning in, or leaving us a comment on Facebook or Twitter. INSIGHTS is also live streamed on pbshawaii.org and Facebook Live.

 

Phone Lines:
462-5000 on Oahu or 800-238-4847 on the Neighbor Islands.

 

Email:
insights@pbshawaii.org

 

Facebook:
Visit the PBS Hawai‘i Facebook page.

 

Twitter:
Join our live discussion using #pbsinsights

 

 


PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
The Quietest Place on Earth

 

On the island of Maui, Haleakala rises 10,000 feet – nearly two miles – into the sky. The massive crater located at its summit carries the unique distinction of being “the quietest place on Earth.” The exquisite stillness of its stark volcanic landscape inspires a variety of experiences ranging from spiritual to philosophical. Featured are musical artist Keola Beamer, poet W.S. Merwin, cultural specialist Clifford Nae’ole, paniolo Wilfred Souza and others.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 913: 2018 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge

 

On Friday January 26, 2018, student teams from twenty middle and high schools took on the 2018 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge. The students had four days to conceptualize, shoot, write, record voiceovers for, and edit a story expressing the theme “A Special Place.” Teachers were allowed to make suggestions to their students, but they were not allowed to provide any hands-on help (no shooting, sound recording, writing, or editing). The theme was announced at the beginning of the four-day challenge, so no pre-planning was possible before then.

 

Eight of the best stories from the challenge will be featured:

 

–“Shige’s Saimin Stand” by Moanalua High School (O‘ahu)

Inspired by childhood memories of his grandparent’s saimin stand in Haleiwa, Ross Shigeoka opened Shige’s Saimin Stand twenty-eight years ago in Wahiawa. It has since developed into a home for members of the community to gather and carry out the traditions of enjoying Shige’s homemade saimin and hamburgers. What started out as a business has become a focal point for families from Wahiawa and beyond.

 

–“Taro Farming” by Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School (Maui)

Hōkūao Pellegrino of Nohū‘ano Farms dedicates his life to restoring ancient taro patches that his family began cultivating in Waikapū, Maui back in the 16th century. He hosts approximately one thousand students every year to teach them about the relevance of kalo in the Hawaiian culture and how to mālama (care for) the natural resources that provide for this important crop.

 

–“Cafeteria” by Nānākuli High and Intermediate School (O‘ahu)

The story of how the cafeteria at Nānākuli High and Intermediate School doubles as the home of the Nānākuli Performing Arts Company (NPAC), an organization that transforms lives by providing a sense of family, self-esteem and pride for its performers, mentors, alumni and audience members.

 

–“A Special Piece of Home” by Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i)

A personal essay featuring a high school graduate about to head off to college on the mainland who reflects on the things she will miss about her island home of Kaua‘i.

 

–“Volcanoes National Park” by Volcano School of Arts & Science (Hawai‘i Island)

A young man talks about the stories of Hawaiian gods and goddesses he has learned at Volcanoes National Park, which has sparked his curiosity to learn more about the Hawaiian culture. He also reflects on the incredible natural beauty he has experienced at the park, particularly around Halema‘uma‘u Crater.

 

–“Agnes’ Portuguese Bake Shop” by Kalaheo High School (O‘ahu)

Agnes’ Portuguese Bake Shop has been a Kailua gathering place for forty-seven years. Longtime patrons reminisce about what the bake shop has meant to them as, sadly, it prepares to close its doors for good.

 

–“Affordable Housing” by Maui Waena Intermediate School (Maui)

The Lokahi Foundation, a non-profit housing and community development organization, has just completed a development of affordable homes in the Happy Valley area of Wailuku, Maui. As the new homeowners move in, these individual “special places” come together to form a neighborhood of people bound together by the shared desire to create safe, happy homes for their families.

(Middle School winner of the 2018 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge)

 

–“Teen Parent Center” by Maui High School (Maui)

While attending Baldwin High School, fifteen year-old Jada Apolo became a teen mother. The responsibilities of motherhood made continuing high school close to impossible, until she transferred to Maui High School, one of three public schools in Hawai‘i to offer on-campus childcare and a teen parent program. This enabled Jada to continue with high school, but a recent spike in the number of incoming freshman caused a shortage of resources that threatened to close Maui High’s teen parent program. Jada launched a community awareness/support campaign that she hopes will lead to funding for an alternative teen parent program for her and other teen moms in the area.

(High School winner of the 2018 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge)

 

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