Maui

HIKI NŌ 2|27|20:
2020 Winter Challenge Middle School Division | Program

 

This special edition features stories from the Middle School division of the 2020 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge.  On January 31, 2020, participating elementary, middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the prompt: “The wisdom of elders brought to life by the young.”   Teachers could not provide hands-on help.  The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own.  The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?
 
2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?
 
3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, First-Place, Second-Place, Third-Place, and Honorable Mention awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. The following Middle School Division awardees will be featured in this special:

 

–First Place in the Middle School Division:

 

“Misfit Martial Arts Instructor”
The challenge team from ʻEwa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu tells the story of a martial arts instructor who passes down to his students life lessons he’s learned during his rocky youth.

 

–Second Place in the Middle School Division:

 

“Piano Teacher”
The challenge team from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School tells the story ofa grandmother who has taught piano to two generations of her family, as well as scores of other Maui residents.

 

–Third Place in the Middle School Division:

 

“Coach Jensen”
The challenge team from Waiākea Elementary School on Hawaiʻi Island tells the story of a baseball stand-out who, because of his short stature, channeled his passion for the sport from playing to coaching.  Because there is not a separate elementary school division for HIKI NŌ challenges, elementary schools compete in the Middle School Division.  This is the first time an elementary school has placed in a HIKI NŌ Challenge.

 

–Honorable Mention in the Middle School Division:

 

”Ongaeshi: Giving Back”

 

The challenge team from Highlands Intermediate School on Oʻahu tells the story of a judo sensei who is passing his knowledge of this form of martial art to his children.

 

HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge stories from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui,Kealakehe Intermediate School in Kona, and Kapaʻa Middle School on Kauaʻi are also featured.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.  Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 2|13|20: A Son’s Love and Other Stories | Program

 

TOP STORY

 

“A Sonʻs Love”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului, Maui, tell the story of a single mother who hits rock bottom after suffering from a series of emotional and physical ailments. Through the love and support of her son, she eventually learns how to enjoy her new life and look to the future.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Lucky Bees”
Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School on the Valley Isle tell the story of a passionate Kīhei beekeeper who aims to protect the island’s native bee population from dangers afflicting bee colonies around the world.

 

“Okinawan Connection”
Students from Kalāheo High School from the Kailua district of Oʻahu tell the story of Hawaiʻi Okinawans who sent 550 pigs to revitalize pig farming and bring normalcy to an Okinawa devastated by World War II.

 

“How to De-Stress”
Students from Hilo Intermediate School on the Big Island show us three tips on how to “put stress to rest” in our ever-busy world.

 

“Heart of Gold”
Students from Moanalua High School on the island of Oʻahu tell the story of a bubbly woman who believes in living every day to its fullest while working hard to take care of her Alzheimer’s-afflicted mother.

 

Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School host this episode of HIKI NŌ from their campus in Pukalani, Maui.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 2|6|20: Mele Murals and Other Stories | Program

 

TOP STORY

 

“Mele Murals”
Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy in the Waimea district of Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of volunteers from an arts organization known as Mele Murals who taught Waimea area students how to use meditation to guide them through the painting of a mural at the Waimea Community Center.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Kitten Yoga”
Students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of an inventive program launched at the Hawaiʻi Island Humane Society—Kitten Yoga. Kittens for whom the Human Society is trying to find forever homes are allowed to roam around during a yoga class attended by potential cat owners. The play and bonding that goes on between the kittens and the yoga practitioners often lead to adoption.

 

“Goteborg Musubi”
Students from Kapaʻa Middle School on the Garden Island show us how to make a type of musubi (rice ball) unique to Kauaʻi—the Goteborg Musubi, made with a smoked sausage that was introduced to the island by a German stonewall builder during the plantation era.

 

“Malorie Arisumi”
Students from ʻIao School on Maui tell the story of a Maui-based artist who had started a family during her senior year in high school and, consequently, had to delay her college-level art training to a later period in her life.

 

“Working Mom”
Students from Farrington High School in the Kalihi district of O’ahu tell the story of an immigrant from the Philippines who works three jobs in order to make ends meet, much to the chagrin of her teenaged son, who feels his mother is not able to spend enough time with him.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ also features profiles on the unique sports programs offered at some of the schools in the show.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 1|23|20: The Student’s Take | Program

 

This special edition features HIKI NŌ students Kallen Wachi (Waimea High School, Kauaʻi) and Kaycee Nakashima (Hawaii Baptist Academy, Oʻahu) convening in PBS Hawaiʻi’s HIKI NŌ editing suite to share their insights, feelings and revelations about some of the top stories from the Fall Semester of the 2019-2020 school year. (Kallen and Kaycee began their HIKI NŌ careers together at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi.) The stories Kallen and Kaycee give their take on include:

 

“Suburbia”
A student at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui shares her inner-most thoughts about becoming a filmmaker in a personal video essay.

 

“Martin Charlot”
Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island follow veteran painter Martin Charlot (son of legendary artist Jean Charlot) as he restores a mural he created 46 years ago for what is now called the Ellison Onizuka Gymnasium at Konawaena High School.

 

“Shy Girl”
Students from Hilo High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a severely shy female Hilo High student who came out of her shell after she found her niche in her school’s media club.

 

“Chazz’s World”
Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tell the story of Chazz – a high school student who works at a pizza parlor to help his family pay the bills. The story explores the stress and other emotional hardships the situation causes for Chazz.

 

“A Second Chance”
Students from Waiākea High School in the Hilo district of Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of Easten Tanimoto, a young man who, under the influence of psilocybin (hallucinogenic mushrooms), climbed a telephone pole, was electrocuted, then fell to the ground, sustaining serious injuries and severe burns. After a miraculous recovery, Tanimoto has dedicated his life to speaking at schools and inspiring students to make better life choices.

 

 

 

SIMPLY MING
On the Road in Hawaiʻi

SIMPLY MING: On the Road in Hawaiʻi

 

On this episode, Ming is on the road in Hawaiʻi. His first stop finds him in Maui where he visits the Aliʻi Kula Lavender Farm. He is then joined by former Sous Chef at Blue Ginger now Executive Chef at the Andaz Maui at Wailea Resort, Isaac Bancaco. Isaac competed as Ming’s sous chef on Iron Chef America defeating Bobby Flay in his first defeat on home soil. As a “Top Young Chef to Watch” by Travel Age West in 2011 and only chef in the Pacific Business News’ 2014 Top 40 under 40, he pays tribute to his Maui roots Kaʻana Kitchen at the Andaz Maui in Wailea. Bancaco possesses deep-rooted pride in Hawaiʻi’s locally grown and produced goods to provide diners a paralleled sense of place and taste of his home. Together Ming and Isaac make Lavender Grilled Rice Cakes with Hawaiian Ahi Poke, a Grilled Spicy Tuna Maki Sushi Roll and whip up a Maui Lavender Arnold Palmer before they hit the golf course.

 

 

 

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX
Stephanie Han

 

Award-winning writer Stephanie Han draws from her life experiences to inform her poetry, fiction and non-fiction, which frequently grapple with identity in multicultural settings. Her childhood was anchored by books, which helped her make sense of others and the world around her. Though her life has taken her around the globe, she now calls Honolulu home where she continues her work as a writer and educator.

 

This program will be rebroadcast on Sunday, Mar. 8, at 4:00 pm and 11:30 pm.

 

Stephanie Han Audio

 

Download the Transcript

 

Transcript

 

Reading is one of the few creative art forms where we enter the mind of somebody on a deeply intimate and personal level, across time, across cultures. You’re concocting in your mind what the person looks like and they become something you invent.

 

As a child, she found refuge in books, which she called her friends because her family moved so frequently. She says reading and writing are linked and somehow writing chose her and she became a writer. Stephanie Han, next, on Long Story Short. 

 

One on one engaging conversations with some of Hawai‘i’s most intriguing people. Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox.

 

Aloha mai kākou, I’m Leslie Wilcox. Stephanie Han was born Stephanie Mi Suk Yoo but goes by her maternal family’s name. A resident of Kaimukī, O‘ahu, she’s a teacher with a doctorate at Punahou School at Honolulu, and she’s a writer of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction, much of it about one’s identity in multicultural settings. Dr. Han is the author of “Swimming in Hong Kong”, a collection of short stories. Her father was one of Korea’s top scholars before he came to the United States to attend university, becoming a medical doctor and research scientist. Her mother was raised in Kunia Camp in central O‘ahu, a descendant of the first wave of Korean immigrants to Hawai‘i.  Stephanie Han’s parents met in the San Francisco Bay area, and after they were married, lived all over the United States, fueled in part by their wanderlust.

 

Where do you call home?

 

Now, Hawai‘i is home and in a sense I think it always was a spiritual and familial home to me, we just simply moved around the Continental U.S. I’ve lived in every place except the Pacific Northwest because my family was peripatetic, we were itinerant, and I have been as an adult. But this is the one place we always came for weddings, funerals, family birthdays, and gatherings, so, I would say, in a sense, if I could call one place an idea of home, this would be it. Hawaii was where I could have a sense of belonging, where I could have an Asian face but I could speak English and it wasn’t a big deal, um, where I saw different kinds of cultures and people interacting in a relatively peaceful way and this was a contrast to growing up in the mainland in certain areas where my family were kind of these pioneers, in the Midwest or in the South or even in certain areas of New England.

 

Did you experience racism or was it people who simply didn’t know what to say to you and said the wrong thing?

 

I think it was both, you know, my mother grew up in Kunia on the plantation and so when kids were kind of chicken fighting and kind of bullying me and beating me up when I was in third grade, she wasn’t gonna have that. She was, she…um, immediately asked um, somebody in the Korean community whose father knew judo, to take me on as a student.

 

So she was not a hovering parent in the sense that she approached the bully, she prepared you to approach the…

 

Yes.

 

Ok, so what happened?

 

And so, because she grew up, you know, watching boxing matches and wrestling in the Kunia gym, and so, yes, I was supposed to be a good Korean-American daughter, but I needed to know how to fight back. And so, um, we, me and the bully, we had it out in front of the drinking fountain. He was a head taller than me and the kids gathered, and I don’t even know how it…after a month, I was very confident, after judo lessons for one month, I obviously felt I could take him on, and um, you know, he hit me, and I punched him back, and then we were hauled off to the, um, by the school librarian, who, now, I know they must’ve thought it was really hysterical because I was a head and a half shorter…

 

And boy-girl, I mean usually boys don’t take shots at girls, right?

 

And boy-girl, exactly, and then…

 

So this is a bad bully…

 

Yes, and then, he was crying and I was not, I was just in shock and just paranoid that my mother would get mad at me and he never bothered me, nor did anyone ever bother me at the school again, and I was never physically bothered like that again because it was…it’s all psychological, right? It’s how you carry yourself.

 

Why did you move so much?

 

That was my parents, I think their adventure. So, for my mother, being, growing up pre-statehood, her adventure of travel…I mean, my family traveled a lot overseas, too, but her adventure was in the mainland and for my father, as an immigrant to the United States, this was also his adventure of seeing America.

 

That meant you switched schools a lot.

 

I switched schools every year until I was nine.

 

That’s a lot.

 

What you get used to is, you know, making friends, and you also get used to leaving, it prepares you for different kinds of relationships and different kinds of ways of navigating, and it also obliges you to be more open, and what it did was, it made me closer, I think, to my family and to my parents, and to hold on to things that were permanent, let’s say like coming here, seeing Grandma in the summer or seeing my cousins here, this became a kind of…a permanent idea.

 

Did you have any tricks about how to make friends as a kid when you were starting a new school?

 

No, and I think it did become difficult and it’s what propelled me to become a reader and a writer…because, um, at a certain point, I think, you know, we were often in these places like Iowa, where there were not a lot of Asian-American children, and I remember telling my mom that I had troubles making friends and she said, well, if you read a book, you’ll always have a friend. And this had to do with how she was, I think, and she was a bookworm, and she was a mom who, um, you know, sought out intellectual and creative things, and we didn’t talk as much about feelings, we could find those through books and things like that, so, um, you know, books became my world, books became a way I could make friends, she was right. Books became a path to understanding and to figuring out how people behaved, and from reading comes writing, an idea of expressing personal narrative.

 

I think I’ve heard you say that uh, your mom taught you the importance of creative expression, your father taught you never to quit, which came in very handy when you’re a writer seeking publication.

 

Yeah, so that was definitely my father. So there’s a saying he used to tell me, fall down seven times, get up eight times. A really perfect example of it was me with math studies. So when I was in ninth grade, I went off to boarding school at Phillips Academy Andover, I was a straight-A student prior, I get to Andover, everybody was a straight-A student, so, I really struggled, and I was getting a…I think I was failing math, and so, my father and mother said, we’re tired of you, you know, calling us up at, you know, every night, crying about your math homework so you come back for Thanksgiving. So I came back for Thanksgiving, I did math six to seven hours a day with my father, and um, flew back, I passed the exam, and then I stepped off the plane in December and my dad said, we’re not…we’re conquering this math thing. And so, I did math with my father…I went to work with him six to eight hours a day, every single day of my three week holiday. I would sit there in the gas station, in the front seat of the car, while he’s pumping the gas, doing math problems, um, I did the entire math book, over Christmas.

 

Did you want to do that? Did you resent that?

 

Uh, at first I resented it, but then after awhile I liked it. Like I still know the quadratic formula to this day, because he made me write it down 27 times, because he said if you write anything down 27 times, you’ll never forget it. What it showed me was that you don’t have to be good at something, you can persist and you don’t have to quit, and then I went back and I went from being a D-student in math to two A’s.

 

What does your dad think of your career? He seems like a very success-oriented guy and goes by the numbers, and being a writer is not going by the numbers, especially as a female…

 

Yeah…yeah, my dad, um, human being status is, um, granted upon a Masters degree, so now I have a PhD, so you know, it’s ok.

 

Don’t you have two Masters?

 

Yeah, I have two Masters degrees.

 

And a PhD, the first PhD in English Literature…

 

Literature, from City University of Hong Kong.

 

And you do a lot of professional teaching as well?

 

Yes, so, I consider myself a writer and educator, and I think, you know, my father was a, you know, he was a research scientist and a university professor, too, so he’s proud of that, you know, so in a sense, although it wasn’t in science and most of his family were medical doctors, even my aunts who were 85 years old in Korea, were medical doctors in Korea at the time, which was quite radical for women, but so now, you know, he knows I teach and I write and it’s something that is parallel…parallels his interests.

 

Stephanie Han’s award-winning writings are influenced by the books she read growing up, as much as by her life experiences. Her narratives often center on female protagonists who deal with issues of race, gender, and colonialism, and above all, identity.

 

You said your friends were books?

 

Yeah.

 

And you do live other people’s experiences through books?

 

Oh yeah, like my early experiences were just, you know, like in Iowa reading Laura Ingalls Wilder. I used to ask my mom why she didn’t wear a bonnet and churn butter…like why…

 

Because that’s the real mother…

 

Yeah…I sent away to the Laura Ingalls Wilder home for photos of Laura Ingalls Wilder. So there are family photos of the Ingalls and Wilder family with my family photos because they, it became such a part of how I was trying to understand where I was living.

 

Did you watch the TV show, too?

 

Yeah, but I didn’t like the TV show as much. That was kind of just a short cut, and I was one of those, you know, that didn’t match, that was in, you know, on the shores of Silver Lake, that wasn’t in the second book, you know, I could really…

 

Who’s [INDISTINCT] anyway?

 

Yeah, yeah, I was like, you know, Pa didn’t play the violin like that. You know, I was really…I could be very exact about it. And there were some, also some things that were not quite, you might say kosher, about those books, of when it was written. You know, their treatment…her treatment of how she saw Native Americans, or how Pa was doing the darky kind of dance where he was wearing blackface, and I didn’t understand this as I was reading it, so I find it sort of interesting, you know, how you read one book to open your mind, and I did need those books when I was little, to understand the farm children that I was going to school with and their background and then how later you read them differently. So, um, but yeah, you know, that’s when I would, you know, I’d say, can we have apple pie like Farmer Boy? You know…

 

But reading does…depending on what you read, does teach you empathy, or at least the ability to identify

 

Yes.

 

with somebody else whose, maybe, outer behavior is off-putting…

 

Yes.

 

Because you don’t understand it or you don’t think there’s a reason for it, but when you read a book and you see what’s going on inside…

 

Yes, because reading is one of the few creative art forms where we enter the mind of somebody on a deeply intimate and personal level, across time, across cultures, even when we’re seeing a movie, we’re looking at somebody from the outside in, right? We’re looking at their face. We’re not looking inside their brain. So, when you’re reading, we’re entering somebody’s very intimate thoughts, it’s that magic…

 

And heart.

 

Yes, you know, how they’re dreaming, how they’re feeling, and sometimes you know, when you’re looking at a picture, um, or illustration, you might initially, you could have these reactions, you could be put off by their clothing or something and you might not be able to enter them in the same way, but when you read something, you’re concocting in your mind what the person looks like and they become something you invent. So, reading also propels us to imagine and it works a different kind of imagination gear, in a way, and we, we relate that to ourselves. Like, yeah, I remember I was riding a bicycle, yeah, that’s what it felt like, this person must be riding a bicycle in the same way, yeah, you know, and it becomes something else, verses, you know, I love photography, and I love film, and I love video, and, you know, all these other kinds of visual images, but, it’s something else, you’re outside in.

 

That’s a great point. What are some of the books that have made the most difference to you in reading?

 

Well, I would say…

 

Besides Laura.

 

It changed, yeah, it changed over the course of time, right? So, um, you know, I read, you know Song of Solomon, by Toni Morrison. When I was a teenage girl, then I read Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior, and that blew me away, I would say really the opening sequence, because it was the first time I could see the picture. There is a woman of color and she kind of looks like me, she’s Asian descent, and look, she wrote this book, and look, this character is not, you know, is fierce, and is a warrior, and is running through the woods and doing these things, and that was really eye-awakening, and I love Jane Austen. Years later, I read the Makioka Sisters by Junichiro Tanizaki in translation which is very similar to the Austen book, and that was the book that my mother told me to read and I could see how she transposed ideas of, you know, protocol and manners and this, and how they came through to my upbringing. My narrative has always been something that’s been changing, um, narratives that were…I was told and then tried to imitate, so, I think about this idea of the stories that were maybe told to, let’s say me, through a religious or philosophical structure, which were Confucian virtues, right? Which were…Confucianism is built on the pillars of five relationships, right? King, subject, teacher, husband, wife, and almost all of them are hierarchical, except friend to friend, but there’s a very strict hierarchy that organizes a lot of Asian culture and that was the narrative, in a sense, that I think played out for me or continued to play out in a lot of my life. There was also narratives, uh, folk tales that I was told, so…a traditional, it’s a Japanese folktale, it was also told to Korean kids, was Peach Boy, which is…I’m not sure, do you know it…

 

Momotaro?

 

Yes, and I’m sure you’re familiar with this story…

 

I grew up with that story.

 

Yes, and he comes with a peach to this older parents, and he fights…you know, he makes friends with the dog, the pheasant, and the monkey, goes off and he kills all the monsters, and he comes back with wealth to his village and he’s the hero of the story, right? And this is a typical, Joseph Campbell journey…mythic…myth of the hero, which crosses cultures, right? But there really is not…we don’t find the myth of the heroine, and Campbell had said that’s because the wisdom that is had, women always have inherently, and Campbell was writing and speaking at a different time period, because women do need a narrative.

 

What you said before reminded me of something…I was fortunate enough to interview W.S. Merwin, and he said, um, when life is going along pretty well, you tend to read prose, but when you have something awful happening, some emotional thing, what do you do? You read poetry.

 

Poetry…

 

Is that true?

 

Yes, that’s totally true, and I write poetry um, when I have no words, that’s what I say, and then I write prose to try to make a linear sense of an issue.

 

As an adult, Stephanie Han has lived in many different places around the world. She kept moving in part because of the adventure of experiencing different cultures, but that was not her only motivation.

 

You told us how your, your family moved around quite a bit because of your father’s career when you were a child, but you continued to move around as an adult.

 

Yes, it set the pattern. So I thought…so that’s how I became an expatriate, ectera ectera, it set a pattern where you think moving is normal, um, it’s strange because there’s a different skill-set involved with staying, right? And so that’s, to me, this is now my question too, of staying, you know, this is my home now, so this is…this is the question of staying, and um, yeah, you set the pattern because, you know, and what you realize is, there are many people who actually do this…were just…were…maybe we don’t talk about it quite as much, or we’re referring to one place as the home, but a lot of people are rather itinerant.

 

It seems to me that you’ve been in a number of first-of situations, you might’ve been the first Asian girl in a class or…I mean, you’ve done so many um, so many activities in different countries, uh, what have you learned from that? Because it’s not surprising to me that you became a writer, somebody who’s already good in English and…generally, writers keep their distance, they’re detached.

 

Yeah, I think um, what I learned is that you have to be open and you have to be curious to different experiences and you also have to be tolerant, and I think being overseas um, for different periods of my life, also opened that up, and what I also found is language, speaking different languages matters, but you really need an open heart and you need to be able to laugh with somebody, you need to be able to eat food, you need to listen to their music and maybe dance a little, and that becomes more important than, often than, um, let’s say, exchanging literary ideas.

 

And when do you know it’s time for you to move on, or in the past, how did you figure out…was it outwardly directed or did it always come from within?

 

Um, no, sometimes people moved because they think moving will solve things, but moving doesn’t often solve what you…it could solve temporarily, a job, but maybe that’s the job wasn’t really what needed to be solved, or a question about this, right? So…

 

It’s a way of distracting yourself, in part?

 

Yes, right, and you know, there’s more…you know, there’s the adventure of being out verses sometimes, if you stay in one place, the adventure becomes of going in and going still, or going deeper, so I, you know, I…I’ve had people tell me, you know, I don’t think you can come to necessarily, any more wisdom, traveling and moving, then you can come from being in one place and going deeper. You might find that you can still come to very similar ideas of people and behavior and spirit, and some of the people I consider the most wise, who I seek counsel or friendship, or guidance from, are people who are in one place. Because they came to similar ideas and then moved and came to a different way of seeing things that were incredibly wise.

 

Interesting. One thing about staying is that you…if there are issues, you have to either work them out or, or hole up in yourself, and generally people do either…I mean, I would hope people who stay, find a way to work things out.

 

Yeah, and this just becomes the retreat of a writer, too, right? Reading and writing, for me, um, was always a bit of a social, personal retreat, so, I didn’t neces–, you know, if, the outside became too strange or difficult or, I just would read more or I wrote more, which I…I don’t necessarily advise to everybody.

 

Well, why have you moved as an adult?

 

Um…

 

Repeatedly?

 

Yeah, mostly, it was, I think it was work and opportunity, and a desire to seek, and a desire for adventure, and so I think that was the phase that I was also in, and um, there’s like a whole community, you know, if you’re an expatriate, that’s what you do…you just…you move, from place to place often.

 

And you always find people like yourself…

 

Mm hm, and it becomes a community.

 

It is a community.

 

So that is a community.

 

So how do you find people in that community?

 

Um, you know, they can initially be a much more often welcoming and opening…open to people, because everyone wants a place to live, everyone knows you need employment, so people come rushing forth with opportunities or jobs or places to live, they know you need help with this, because it’s kind of this strange pioneering community, right? Whereas, if you often move into community where people have been entrenched for along time, they’re more closed because you’re an outsider and the peculiar thing is, you know, expatriates, they often never really occupy the place that they’re in. They live in the peripheral of wherever they are and that is the community, it’s being on the periphery.

 

That’s interesting, so, perhaps, at this point in your life, that is still your home?

 

Um, no, I’d say…it’s funny, that’s why I think I ended up here because I don’t have to always be on the periphery here. I do have maternal family and maternal roots here, so it allows me to step in here. I didn’t attend school here which makes, you know, Hawaii is very rooted in people’s young, younger years of schooling…

 

Where did you graduate from…

 

Yes, but um, you know, my son is now local to here and my family is here in that sense, or I should say some of my older relatives. So, I can be both an outsider and an insider here and maybe that’s just right.

 

At the time of this taping in 2019, Stephanie Han is teaching at Punahou School and lives in Kaimukī, O‘ahu, where she also continues to write. Mahalo to Stephanie Han for sharing your stories with us and mahalo to you for joining us. For PBS Hawai‘i and Long Story Short, I’m Leslie Wilcox. Aloha nui.

 

I don’t think people choose to be writers, I think writing chooses you and then writing becomes a compulsion. Reading and writing are very linked and um, when it is a certain level of a compulsion then it flows through you and you feel at that moment, this is what you were meant to do and you draft it very quickly and it’s almost as if your body is a kind of vessel for what the words are supposed to be, and there’s other times you sit there and you’re just miserable and you try to run away from the desk and you decide at that moment you need to clean your room, but um, you know, so it varies and you just have to, you know, kind of sit your butt in the chair.

 

 

 

[END]

 

 

HIKI NŌ 3|5|20: 2020 Winter Challenge High School Division | Program

 

This special edition features stories from the High School Division of the 2020 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge. On January 31, 2020, participating elementary, middle school and high school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the prompt: “The wisdom of elders brought to life by the young.” Teachers could not provide hands-on help. The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own. The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

1.) How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?

2.) How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?

3.) How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, First-Place, Second-Place, Third-Place, and Honorable Mention awards were given in both the middle school and high school divisions. The following High School Division awardees will be featured in this special:

 

–First Place in the High School Division:

 

“The Show Goes On”
The challenge team from Maui High School tells the story of a dance instructor whose love for the art form inspires generations of passionate dancers to continue the cycle of knowledge and inspiration.

 

HIKI NŌ 3|5|20: 2020 Winter Challenge High School Division | Program

 

–Second Place in the High School Division:

 

“Major Advice”
The challenge team from Waimea High School on Kauaʻi tells the story of a retired Army major who empowers generations of JROTC cadets to achieve their goals and become leaders by looking out for their welfare and teaching them hallmarks of success.

 

–Third Place in the High School Division:

 

“More Than Just a Language”
The challenge team from Hilo High School on the Big Island tells the story of a high school student who learned more than language and cultural traditions from her Hawaiian language class. Along with the special bond she formed with her teacher and class, she gained morals and values that she wishes to pass on to her younger brother and those after him.

 

–Honorable Mention in the High School Division:

 

”Intergenerational Practices”
The challenge team from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tells the story of a Japanese folk dance teacher and a student whose passion for perpetuating the Japanese tradition makes his family and community members proud.

 

HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge stories from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu and Kauaʻi High School are also featured.

 

“No Cost for Kindness”
The challenge team from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu tells the story of a student who learned respect and kindness at home and practices these lessons at school by helping kids in need.

 

“Mālama Huleʻia: Preserving the Past”
The challenge team from Kauaʻi High School tells the story of a non-profit organization that relies on the wisdom and traditions of elders to connect with the past, revitalize Hawaiian lands, and teach the community youth to take care of the environment for years to come.

 

First-place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Second-place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Third-place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Honorable mention winners will receive $100 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
Ahumanu

 

We’re proud to present a brand-new episode of NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG featuring the all-wāhine Hawaiian music trio Ahumanu, from Maui. Members Kekai Robinson, Marja Lehua Apisaloma and Liz Morales say their work in the community outside the entertainment realm brings to their music a dimension of authenticity, service and responsibility. The trio, whose name translates to “a gathering of birds,” performs songs including “E ʻAno ʻAno Ē” and “Kahi Aloha.” Guitarist Josh Kahula and steel guitarist Casey Olsen are also featured, with Leinaʻala Kuloloio Vedder providing hula accompaniment.

 

 

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Tibetan Illusion Destroyer

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS: Tibetan Illusion Destroyer

 

This film by Maui filmmaker Tom Vendetti documents the Mani Rimdu Festival in Nepal, which originated in Tibet and is still performed in an authentic colorful ceremony in the shadow of Mount Everest. The title refers to the Buddhist concept of destroying man-made illusions that lead to human suffering. Vendetti and renowned Hawaiian musician Keola Beamer were part of a Hawai‘i contingent that journeyed to Nepal to attend the festival. Beamer worked with musicians in Nepal to create the film’s original music.

 

 

 

Ahumanu
Maui-based Trio

Cover story by Liberty Peralta, PBS Hawaiʻi

 

Ahumanu on Nā Mele: Traditions in Hawaiian Song

Members of Ahumanu: Kekai Robinson, Marja Lehua Apisaloma and Liz Morales

 

Like the latest smartphone or computer software, Ahumanu founding member Liz Morales calls the band’s third and current lineup of band members “Ahumanu 3.0.”

 

It’s not unusual for bands to see lineup changes. But Morales, a former radio personality, is confident that this version is something special.

 

“We have our own sound, and that comes from working with what we have,” Morales says. “Since we had so many different players, each version of Ahumanu sounded very different, so I think it’s only until Ahumanu 3.0 that I realized, hey, this is kind of different, I like it.”

 

Marja Lehua Apisaloma and Kekai Robinson round out the Maui trio, whose name translates as “a gathering of birds.” Each member brings her own contributions to the Ahumanu table.

 

Ahumanu on Nā Mele: Traditions in Hawaiian Song

 

Apisaloma says her day job as a registered nurse helps add some level of authenticity to the group’s music – a reminder of how much they have to be thankful for, down to the most essential details.

 

“We can breathe and we can use the bathroom on our own, we can walk on our own, we can speak,” she says. “You see all of that as a nurse and see people at their most vulnerable times. It’s such a drastic difference from the entertainment industry because you put on a face and it’s all a show.”

 

Robinson, who heads Hawaiian immersion school Ke Kula ʻO Piʻilani by day, says Ahumanu is an extension of the community work that’s played an important role in her life.

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN MUSIC - Ahumanu airs Monday, February 24 at 7:30 pm. Sponsored by: Hawaiian Airlines and First Hawaiian Bank“I practice Hawaiian oli (chants), and those are the messages and the voices of our ancestors coming through,” she says. “The messages that they give us are relevant now, so there’s a great sense of responsibility there to do the same in our music.”

 

That responsibility shows in songs like “Kahi Aloha,” one of several songs that Ahumanu performs on an upcoming episode of PBS Hawaiʻi’s Nā Mele: Traditions in Hawaiian Song. Originally written as a wedding gift, “Kahi Aloha” has taken on a larger meaning in Robinson’s eyes.

 

“Aloha has become a big part of this contemporary move towards protecting our environment, protecting what we have,” she says. “When you stand in aloha, you can come at me and bring whatever it is that you are to me, but I am going to stand here and remain respectful towards you. It’s a discipline, and so, I understand it now. It’s not our normal state. We want to work towards aloha being a normal state.”

 

Through their weekly pau hana performances in Kahului, Ahumanu has a regular platform to share their messages in song, with authenticity, respect and love. Ahumanu 3.0 is on a roll, and Morales ponders what’s next.

 

“I’d like to be a resource for the next generation of musicians that would like to do this,” she says. “Growing up in this field, it was such a mess. I didn’t know how to get where I wanted to be and those lines were so unclear … [now] I’m living the life, having a great time and very happy that I’m able to help perpetuate what we’ve known forever: Hawaiian music.”

 

 

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