Mid-Pacific Institute

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX
Paul Turnbull

 

Throughout his career, Paul Turnbull has helped create learning environments that encourage students to thrive. As President of Mid-Pacific Institute, he champions project-based learning and embraces innovation and technology in education – values that he brought with him from his experience at California public schools.

 

This program will be rebroadcast on Wednesday, Jan. 24, at 11:00 pm and Sunday, Jan. 28, at 4:00 pm.

 

Paul Turnbull Audio

 

Download the Transcript

 

Transcript

 

In my world, in the preschool through twelfth grade world, I look at the … the defining characteristic of many schools is the old adage that you have to be a certain age before we can expose you to some sort of academic concept or subject. And all of us anywhere have probably been the recipient of a very pejorative: You’re not quite old enough to understand this yet. And while that may have been delivered with good intentions, most of the time, it’s just flat-out wrong.

 

He’s the president of Mid-Pacific Institute in Honolulu, and he believes that students should be able to pursue subjects that fuel their interest. Paul Turnbull, next, on Long Story Short.

 

One-on-one engaging conversations with some of Hawai‘i’s most intriguing people: Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox.

 

Aloha mai kākou. I’m Leslie Wilcox. In 2013, Paul Turnbull became the president of Mid-Pacific Institute in Mānoa, Honolulu, Hawai‘i, one of the largest private schools in the State with an enrollment of over fifteen hundred students from preschool to the twelfth grade. As the head of a school already known for its innovative approaches to education, Dr. Turnbull continues to move the school forward with project-based learning. He embraces the use of cutting edge technology for the students, and he pays close attention to how the changing job market will require very different skillsets, so that teachers can prepare the students. He says family and education are at the center of his life, and this native Canadian combined both when he decided to apply for U.S. citizenship. He enlisted the help of his fifth grade daughter and her class. This took place in 2015, two years after he took the reins at Mid Pacific Institute. The educator became a student again, with grade schoolers learning alongside him in preparations for the citizenship test, which he aced. For Paul Turnbull, the journey to Hawai‘i and U.S. citizenship began up north.

 

I was born and raised in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. So, the eastern side of Canada. And my parents are really interesting individuals, and they worked really hard to sort of move us up, and we moved around the Toronto area for quite some time. And then, ultimately, over a period of years and going to different colleges, I wound up on the West Coast, just outside of Vancouver.

 

When you say your parents tried very hard to move you up, what does that mean?

 

Well, Mom and Dad both were high school graduates; they didn’t have college degrees. And so, Mom was in banking, Dad was in the telephone company. So, Mom started as a teller, a bank teller, and you don’t make a lot of money as a bank teller. And Dad was climbing telephone poles for quite some time. And ultimately, what ended up happening is that they each found that, I think to their own credit, they were more intelligent than perhaps they gave themselves credit for. And because of that, they worked their way up the ladder, each corporate ladder. So, in the telephone industry, telecommunications, and then in banking. And as that happened, we moved from one neighborhood to the next, and it was sort of the Canadian version of the American Dream where, you know, you realize that all kinds of things are possible.

 

Were they explicit in giving you advice, or did you learn by example?

 

Both. In my mom’s side of the conversation, I ultimately learned that the restrictions and sort of the barriers that are put in front of you, either from a societal level or from an industry level—she was a woman in a man’s world in banking, finance. She ultimately ended up becoming the only woman on her floor in the corporate office. So, in Toronto, Bay Street is the equivalent of Wall Street in New York. Only woman on her floor, so that was difficult. And I learned from her that barriers are both real, but they’re also what you make of them. And if you disagree with them and you just apply yourself, and you continually show that you can outwork anybody around you, then things will move. So, she moved very large mountains. Yeah; she did not agree with being told that she couldn’t do something because of her gender, so she just went ahead and did it.

 

And what about your dad? You said he rose in the ranks as well.

 

M-hm. So, the funny thing about Dad is that he’s the smartest guy in the room, but he manifests his intelligence into jokes. So, he’s a practical joker. And ultimately, he went from climbing telephone poles to managing a crew, and then ending up overseeing and engineering department in the corporate office as well. So, they ended up actually about two blocks away from each other on Bay Street. And you know, when I was in high school, they were both there.

 

And that was the equivalent of Wall Street in Toronto.

 

Correct. Yeah. And even as a high-schooler, you know, you’re jaded, and you think parents are so lame, when you’re in high school. But they would go and have lunch together. And Nathan Phillips Square is the city hall in Toronto. And right in front of Nathan Phillips Square is this very large fountain, but in the wintertime, they freeze it, and it’s a skate rink. And they would go skating at lunch. I mean, even as a high-schooler, I thought that was kinda sweet. So … yeah; they had the nice ability to come together on multiple levels.

 

Did you have brothers and sisters?

 

I’m an only.

 

So, they poured everything into you?

 

Yes and no. Mom made sure that I didn’t turn out to be representative of the stereotype, that everything is for me. Although my family every so often has to remind me at Christmas that all the presents under the tree are actually for everybody else.

 

While your parents were both working, you were actually really applying yourself. You did, what, four sports. What sports did you play?

 

In high school, so I played football, basketball, rugby, track and field. And I was lifeguarding on the side, so every so often for the swim team, they just needed points, so they’d throw me in for like, a fifty-meter freestyle.

 

So, you loved athleticism.

 

Yeah. If I was not moving, I was not a pleasant person to be around, so athletics was a very good thing for me, because it just made sure that I was occupied.

 

How did you do in school?

 

High school, I could have done much better, mostly because I was, you know, either in a pool, or I was on a field somewhere, or on a basketball court.

 

Paul Turnbull certainly applied himself in college, earning three degrees, with a fourth, a PhD to come later. He says his mother made sure he was grounded.

 

My mom reminded me—of course, you know, Mom was always around. My mom reminded me after my third degree that all those letters don’t yet spell J-O-B, so it was time to get a job teaching. So, I did that.

 

And by the way, how did you decide to be a teacher?

 

You know, honestly, it had everything to do with my teachers in high school. They clearly loved their job, they loved being together. They were inseparable. It was funny; they were like kids themselves. You know, they were always playing together. We were either playing basketball together, or I would see them going out and camping, and they started an outdoor camping club. So, I learned how to go camping in the snow in high school, and those kinds of things. And it just sort of hit me. I was in physiology class, and Dave Kaye was the teacher. And it just was the most matter-of-fact, I’m gonna be a teacher moment.

 

Was it a voice you heard, or just this overwhelming thought?

 

It was just a thought. It was not a voice; it was just, I’m gonna do that.

 

And then, you stuck to it.

 

Yeah. Yeah. My family refers to me as Even Steven. You know, if you try too hard to do some things, I think people in life probably have learned for the most part, if you try to force a square peg into a round hole, it doesn’t work. But if you just follow your passion, and you allow things to move with fluidity, that it all works out.

 

Paul Turnbull followed that sudden realization in physiology class into teaching English and physical education, coaching football and girls’ basketball in British Columbia, Canada. He found he had a passion for teaching. And at a teacher training conference in New Mexico, Dr. Turnbull would find a different kind of passion: the love of his life. Three children later, he can still get a little mushy, just thinking of meeting the woman he would marry.

 

I was teaching in Canada in Vancouver. My wife was teaching in Costa Rica at an international school. We both were teaching international baccalaureate English. And so, the IB organization is this amazing worldwide organization, and they’re known for rigor and fantastic academics. But one of the requirements is that you have to go to an IB training. So, we were both sent to this conference in July in Montezuma. We had no desire to go individually, of course. And we both went. I was sitting in the Albuquerque airport, looked up. That was it.

 

Attended the training, didn’t say anything. And then, you were at the airport?

 

So, we were there for a week, and we ended up in the same class, and it was brutal. I mean, I just … you know, when you fall in love, you fall in love. And, you know.

 

It was brutal to fall in love?

 

No; the ability—it’s happening right now. I can’t speak.

It’s just funny. When you … for me … oh, jeez.

 

You’re thinking back to that time?

Wow; you’re still in love, aren’t you?

 

Yeah. I think … the ability for us to understand that, you know, there was a great distance geographically between the two of us. And in those days, you know, internet and email, and all of those things were not readily available. So, it was an old fashioned letter writing correspondence.

 

That befits two teachers.

 

Which does, especially English teacher; right? So, it was just one of those things where … just like the teaching, when I decided I was gonna be a teacher, it was the most matter of fact, don’t have to contemplate this moment. This is just the next step.

 

But again, there were logistics issues. You were living in different countries.

 

Yes. So, at the time, Leslie grew up in Santa Barbara, and so, her parents were currently there. And they weren’t doing very well with their health, and so, it was the right thing to do. So, we moved to Santa Barbara to be closer to them.

 

That’s a beautiful place to live, too.

 

Unbelievable. Yeah; absolutely. So, I moved from snowy Toronto to beautiful Vancouver, to even more beautiful and warmer Santa Barbara.

 

But you did face a little obstacle with jobs; right?

 

Yeah. So, the difficulty about, you know, immigration is that when you go through the process—and it’s a very interesting, very involved and complicated process. Initially, you get two years. And so, it’s sort of a trial period, as a probationary landed immigrant or resident alien. I showed up, and I have a social security number, so I was able to apply for a teaching jobs. And unfortunately, I wasn’t able to get a job teaching English, which is my first love and my first passion. But an administrative opportunity arose, and I was really lucky to be chosen for that.

 

But many teachers would not like the idea of moving to administration. They are two different fields; related, but different. Right? Different skills.

 

M-hm.

 

So, were you really happy?

 

You know, I was. So, as a teacher, in my mind, I could have an effect on thirty students in a classroom. But if I were an administrator, and if I had empathy for all the teachers with whom I worked, and I understood some of the barriers that were just, you know, frankly annoying as a teacher, if as an administrator, I could do something to remove one or more of those barriers, then that meant that I could affect how many students in a school.

 

Did you ever look back? Did you ever say: I want to go back to my first love, teaching?

 

Frequently; yes.

 

Oh, is that right?

 

Yes.

 

But you remained an administrator.

 

I did. It was the path that I was on, and we were together, and we had a family, and you know, sometimes life gives you something that is probably a better course than you think.

 

Is Santa Barbara where you earned your PhD?

 

It is; yeah, at the University of California Santa Barbara.

 

So, you were working and going to school at the same time.

 

Yes; exactly right. And that’s another reason why I am absolutely just head over heels in love with my wife, because man, did she hold down the fort when I was going through my degree. It was a lot of very intense work.

 

You eventually became the head of a school district, one of the school districts in Santa Barbara County.

 

M-hm; that’s right. Yeah; I was the superintendent of the Santa Ynez Valley Union High School District.

 

How many schools did that cover?

 

It only had two schools. That’s the interesting thing about California. So, there are a thousand school districts, generally speaking. My particular school district was small by the number of schools and students, but my geographical area was fifteen hundred square miles.

 

Paul Turnbull married, with three children, and then living in Santa Barbara, California, earned a lot of respect in the role of district superintendent, working with more people in and outside of the school communities. He did not expect to relocate. But in 2012, he received a call that would take him and his family thousands of miles away, to Hawai‘i.

 

Living in Santa Barbara was a great thing, and I got a call from a search consultant, who asked me to consider Mid-Pacific. And I frankly said: You know what, I have a great life. My wife is working at UC Santa Barbara, and our kids are here, and it’s fine.

 

If it’s not broken, don’t fix it.

 

Exactly right. There’s no reason to move. So, I said: Thank you, but no, I’m good. And then, I got a call a couple weeks later and said: No, you should really look. So, we looked; but we look as parents first. Our sons were in boarding school, so that was okay. Meaning that if we had moved away to Hawai‘i, that they’d be fine. So, when we started looking at Mid-Pacific, we were thinking about our daughter, who would have been in fourth grade, had we made the move. And everything that we looked at was great. I mean, it fit our beliefs and our philosophy as a family, it fit, I think in terms of the academic opportunities and the approach to learning that our daughter would have enjoyed. And then, having satisfied that aspect, we started looking at the community, instead of the administrative spot. The community fit very closely with Santa Barbara. And then, I looked at it as a job. And from there, I didn’t see a thing I didn’t like.

 

As the head of Mid-Pacific Institute now, what were some of the things that surprised you that came along? ‘Cause you know, you had certain expectations moving locations. Anything that surprised you, something really that you didn’t expect?

 

The community at large, it was just such a welcoming, wonderful … family-centric, individual … kind of place. And California sometimes can be that, and sometimes can not be that. And it’s a very fast-paced “me” kind of place, depending on where you live. Honolulu didn’t strike me as that, and it was a refreshing breath of fresh air. So, that was the first component. As far as the school is concerned, my office is sort of right in the middle of campus, and you can go up to the Kawaiahao Seminary, the old building which is now our center for the arts, and you can go down to the technology centers and you can see the middle school, and then the elementary school. I can have a bad day, and I can go in any direction, be around kids. Easy.

 

Sometime after you got here, and I know you were received with open arms and things were going very well.

 

M-hm.

 

You made another huge decision, which was actually to leave your Canadian citizenship.

 

So, I’m allowed to have dual citizenship.

 

Do you have it?

 

Yes.

 

Okay; got it.

 

Yeah. So, the United States no longer asks you to renounce and remove all other citizenships. But you do have to denounce all potentates, which I think is hilarious, ‘cause who says potentates.

The idea that I wanted to become a citizen really came out of just the fact that I don’t believe that being a member of your community is a spectator sport. I think that we should be active, we should be involved. I had been doing that at the local level in Santa Barbara as a Californian, but I had never been able to vote, the last remaining step on the hierarchy of things to do.

 

What’s it like learning the civics of the United States? ‘Cause I believe you had to go through classes.

 

Yeah. So, ultimately, the civics test is ten questions that they ask, but it’s based on a set of a hundred questions possible. And so, the test that you get comes from a guide.

 

Oh, so you studied up; it wasn’t classes.

 

Correct; yeah. I didn’t have to go to classes, per se. But what we ended up doing was working with my daughter’s class in fifth grade.

 

At Mid-Pacific Institute?

 

At Mid-Pacific; yeah. So, at Mid Pacific, the teachers in fifth grade were great. We have two classes in the fifth grade. I asked them if they’d be willing to help me out. And it was pretty cool. The kids put together like a video study guide for me.

Using the questions from the guide itself, and I had multiple choice options. And I remember sitting in the classroom, and all the kids were on the floor, and the big screen on the wall with all these questions. And every time I got a question right, this sort of piped-in applause would happen.

It was pretty cute.

 

And your daughter was the springboard for this?

 

Yeah. We talked originally, and I said: You know, what do you think? ‘Cause she’s a dual citizen, so she’s the daughter of a Canadian and an American, born on American soil. So, she can go to Canada with a Canadian passport, she can stay in the U.S. with a U.S. passport. So, I said: What do you think; should I be like you? And yeah, she seemed … like as a fourth-grader then prior to taking the test, I think she had a little bit of this moment of like: That’s pretty cool; you know, like I’ve got something over Dad.

 

And I can help him become like me.

 

Totally.

Yeah; exactly right. And it was great. She was able to help, the class did a fantastic job. And then, when I got my citizenship, after passing the tests, which it’s always nice to pass a test, we were able to go and go as a class for the ceremony. So, you know, a real lesson in civics for the kids. ‘Cause I don’t know how many people really get to see a citizenship ceremony.

 

Paul Turnbull feels he’s become a better member of the community because he gained a greater appreciation for the United States and its values through the preparation process for U.S. citizenship. As the president of Mid-Pacific Institute in Honolulu, Paul Turnbull places a heavy emphasis on project-based learning and innovative approaches to education that have the potential for real world applications.

 

Mid-Pacific Institute has really gotten a lot of great press for technological advancements. But it’s not just being able to use tools; it’s what you do with them. Can you talk a little bit about what you’re doing at Mid-Pacific?

 

Sure. We really took a look at why we needed to get into different versions of technology, and what they could do as tools. And my predecessor, Joe Rice, with whom you spoke on the show, was really the beginning of all of that. In the late 90s, he opened one technology center, then in the early 2000s we opened the Weinberg Technology Center as well. And thanks to the Hartleys, Mike and Sandy Hartley, the Math and Science Complex that we have at Mid Pacific is host to a center that is really like a scaled-down version of the MIT Media Lab. And in that lab, you have the ability to have engineering and digital storytelling, and design, technological design all together, so that the School of the Arts kids and the engineering-minded kids can work together and find different ways to apply these tools. So, that’s the philosophy behind how we approach technology. The tools that we use indirectly are amazing. I mean, they’re just so much fun. We were the first school in the State to use a one-to-one iPad program, so all of our students, right down to kindergarten, have the ability to have a mobile tablet. Because we believe that the application of that technology brings the classroom from the inside to the outside. And now, your real world, much like my citizenship, becomes more than an academic exercise, but it’s something to be learned and valued, and trusted. We’re the only school in the world right now using, I believe, and I’ve done as much looking and research as I can to prove it, using 3D laser scanning. So, Lidar scanning for historic preservation. And that means that our high school students and our middle school students are using an engineering grade level of laser scanning to go out and digitally capture and restore artifacts in our local community. So, we have a museum studies course that’s a humanities course, and a historic preservation class. They have gone out and scanned, for example, Kaniakapūpū, which is King Kamehameha II’s summer retreat, now dilapidated. And when you look at any very old building, there are no as-built drawings, or certainly they don’t meet code today. But if you scan them, and the integrity of those scans is down to the millimeter, anything that happens from that point forward, we can actually help to rebuild them exactly as they are. But ultimately, all technology will go by the wayside. It will evolve. And if it’s viewed as anything other than a simple tool, then we’re getting the message wrong. Problem-solving, the ability to analyze, the ability to use creativity, collaboration, the ability to bring together in groups problem-solving for the real world. So, how can you actually apply all of your learning. So, if you can do all of that with empathy, and you have analytic abilities to approach new learning or new situations with different types of learning, if jobs go away, we’re not lining students up so that they can only be, in my mom’s case, a bank teller, or only be, in my father’s case, a linesman climbing up a telephone pole. They’re gonna have access to technology and problem-solving skills that allow them to be fluid as the market changes.

 

At the time of our conversation in late 2017, Mid-Pacific Institute president Paul Turnbull said it was still the only school in the world, and the only organization in Hawai‘i, utilizing 3D laser scanning for historical preservation. Much like Paul Turnbull’s inclusion of Mid-Pacific’s fifth grade in his citizenship process, it’s an example of how education and the real world can come together. Mahalo to this leader in education, Paul Turnbull, a transplant from Canada and the U.S. West Coast, who has embraced Hawai‘i, and who has been embraced by Hawai‘i. And thank you for joining us for this edition of Long Story Short on PBS Hawai‘i. I’m Leslie Wilcox. Aloha nui.

 

For audio and written transcripts of all episodes of Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, visit PBSHawaii.org. To download free podcasts of Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, go to the Apple iTunes Store or visit PBSHawaii.org.

 

It’s important to give back, and it’s important to realize that there were a lot of lean times when we were growing up, there were a lot of times where we grew into abundance as well. But in the times of abundance, it was clear that I was responsible to find out whatever percentage of things that I had available to me, and then to give them away. So, it was important to be part of the community.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Waipahu Intermediate School

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from Waianae High School present their story, titled “Parental Guidance Required,” about Waianae High School wrestler Anuhea Hamilton and her challenging relationship with her father, Kimo Hamilton. Mr. Hamilton is a former wrestler and plays a major role in Anuhea’s development in the sport. He admits to pushing her hard, all in the interest of preparing his daughter for life after high school because, as he says, “it’s a cruel world out there.” Father and daughter often disagree and butt heads. Mr. Hamilton points out, however, “there’s a difference between overbearing and old school. I’m old school.” In the end, father and daughter both come to the realization that their differences stem from a place of love and mutual respect.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Mid-Pacific Institute on Oahu report on loopholes retailers are finding in Oahu’s plastic bag ban.

 

In contrast, a story from the HIKI NŌ archives by H.P. Baldwin High School shows how retailers on Maui found innovative substitutes for plastic bags after their island’s ban went into effect.

 

Students from Molokai High School tell us about a new program at their school called Text-A-Tip that helps students anonymously report suspicious activities on campus.

 

Students at Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle tell us about a faith-based meals program, Feed My Sheep, that is helping the needy on the Valley Isle.

 

Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai tell the amazing story of a Chiefess student, Haley Gokan, and her dog Harley, who has difficulty walking because of his Canine Degenerative Myelopathy. Haley took it upon herself to design and build a wheelchair for Harley, which gives him a great deal more mobility.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Waipahu Intermediate School on Oahu.

 

This program encores Saturday, March 19 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, March 20 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Ewa Makai Middle School

 

TOP STORY:
Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of Bristyl Dempsey, a thirteen-year-old girl who suffers from Tourette Syndrome – a neurological disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements and vocalizations called tics. Bristyl’s symptoms surfaced when she was in intermediate school. Her tics made her the target of teasing and ridicule by fellow students, and one teacher mistook Bristyl’s involuntary tics as intentional misbehaving in class. Given the pressures this caused, Bristyl’s mother thought it would be better for her daughter to be home-schooled. During her year of home-schooling, Bristyl’s symptoms improved with therapies such as meditation, and her self- esteem increased. She entered Maui High School this year as a freshman and looks forward to a mainstream school experience with her friends and extra-curricular activities such as cheerleading.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students from Mid-Pacific Institute on Oahu profile ukulele phenom Jody Kamisato, who chose the high-risk/high-reward route of opening his own music school over the option of being an employee of someone else’s school.

 

Students from Wheeler Middle School in Central Oahu offer tips on how to prepare an emergency kit in the event of a hurricane.

 

Students from Kalani High School in East Honolulu introduce us to The Canvas, a student-designed, student-run work/play space in Kalihi.

 

Continuing with the theme of students creating their own venues of expression, we take a look at a past HIKI NŌ story from Maui Waena Intermediate School about a high school student who created a youth version of TEDex.

 

Students from Kapolei High School in Central Oahu tell the story of a youth volunteer at the no-kill animal shelter OSPCA (Oahu Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals).

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Ewa Makai Middle School.

 

This program encores Saturday, March 12 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, March 13 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Farrington High School

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Farrington High School on Oahu.

 
Top Story:
Students from Iolani School on Oahu tell the story of a young Iolani graduate who, despite becoming a quadruple amputee due to a devastating disease, continues to live life with grace and appreciation. She visits her alma mater, sharing her inspiring message of perseverance.

 
Also Featured:
Students at Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui explore the controversy surrounding  the construction of a new Central Maui Sports Complex; students at Kainalu Elementary School on Oahu profile a Kailua woman who shares the art of ribbon-lei-making with people from around the world; students at Mid-Pacific Institute on Oahu show how science and spiritualism are coming to the aid of a historic Waikiki icon – the Moana Hotel’s majestic banyan tree; students at Lahainaluna High School on Maui share the story of a Lahaina woman who proudly maintains her Hawaiian heritage through pa’u riding; students at Waiakea High School on Hawaii Island spotlight a locally owned surf company in Kapaa, Kauai that gives back by supporting the community’s sports teams.

 

 

Free Public Screenings of Top Student Video Stories at Local HIKI NŌ Festivals

Press Release Header

 

HONOLULU, HI – Top stories from the past season of HIKI NŌ, PBS Hawaii’s statewide student news network, will be shown at free public screenings on Maui, the Big Island, Kauai and Oahu as part of the 2015 HIKI NŌ Festival. All of the stories in the festival have been nominated for the 2015 HIKI NŌ Awards.

 

“While all stories that air on HIKI NŌ meet our standards, these nominated stories represent the best of the best and the HIKI NŌ Festival is a great way for these young storytellers to show the state what they can do. We invite the public to come and celebrate the great work of these students,”  says HIKI NŌ Executive Producer Robert Pennybacker.

 

The festival honors student-created video stories that aired last school year on HIKI NŌ, PBS Hawaii’s student news program. Click here for a complete list of nominated schools.

 

The HIKI NŌ Festival screening events are free of charge and will be at these locations:

 



MAUI

RSVP for 2015 HIKI NŌ Festival

 

 



HILO (Big Island)

RSVP for 2015 HIKI NŌ Festival

 

 



KONA (Big Island)

RSVP for 2015 HIKI NŌ Festival

 

 



KAUAI

RSVP for 2015 HIKI NŌ Festival

 

 



OAHU

RSVP for 2015 HIKI NŌ Festival

 

HIKI NŌ award winners will be determined through numeric scoring by a panel of veteran industry professionals and will be announced via live stream on Thursday, September 24 at PBSHawaii.org. Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS Hawaii, will present the winners with Donna Tanoue, President of Bank of Hawaii Foundation, HIKI NŌ’s founding broadcast sponsor. The winning school in each category will receive $1,000 in equipment from B&H Photo, plus the HIKI NŌ Shooting Star Award trophy.

 

HIKI NŌ (which means “can do” in the Hawaiian language) is PBS Hawaii’s groundbreaking statewide student news network. Students use 21st-century skills to produce hyperlocal stories that meet PBS national adult journalism standards. A half-hour weekly program airs Thursdays at 7:30 pm on public television. View past episodes or learn more about HIKI NŌ online at PBSHawaii.org/hikino.

 

PBS Hawaii is Hawaii’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawaii and Hawaii to the world.

 

PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii on Twitter

 

HIKI NŌ is Hawaii’s first statewide student news network, made up of 86 public, private and charter schools from across the islands. Through the production of video news stories about their schools and communities, students gain valuable workforce and life skills, while teachers engage their students in hands-on, collaborative learning.

PBSHawaii.org/hikino | facebook.com/hikinocando | @hikinocando on Twitter

 

2015 HIKI NŌ AWARD—NOMINEES

 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE—MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School – “Papa Fu” (Kauai)

Kapaa Middle School – “Fire Knife Dancer” (Kauai)

King Intermediate School – “DJ Aisha” (Oahu)

Lahaina Intermediate School – “Security Guard” (Maui)

Seabury Hall Middle School – “Marching Band Director” (Maui)

 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE—HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

Campbell High School – “Dancing Teen”   (Oahu)

Hana K-12 School – “Songbird of Hana” (Maui)

Iolani School – “Summer Kozai”   (Oahu)

Kealakehe High School – “Red Cross Volunteer” (Hawaii Island)

Mid-Pacific Institute – “Mark Yamanaka” (Oahu)

 

BEST HOME-BASE SCHOOL—MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle (Maui)

Kapaa Middle School (Kauai)

Punahou Middle School (Oahu)

 

BEST HOME-BASE SCHOOL—HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

Island School (Kauai)

Kaiser High School (Oahu)

Kua o ka La Public Charter School Milolii Hipuu Virtual Academy (Hawaii Island)

Leilehua High School (Oahu)

Mid-Pacific Institute (Oahu)

 

BEST NEWS WRITING—MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Aliamanu Middle School – “Ms. Lee Loy” (Oahu)

Ewa Makai Middle School – “Tech P.E.” (Oahu)

Hongwanji Mission School – “Father Coach” (Oahu)

Maui Waena Intermediate School – “Sports Complex” (Maui)

 

BEST NEWS WRITING—HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

Kalaheo High School – “Battery 405” (Oahu)

Kamehameha Schools Kapalama – “Never Alone Video Game” (Oahu)

Kua o ka La Public Charter School Milolii Hipuu Virtual Academy – “Mauna Kea TMT” (Hawaii Island)

Maui High School – “All Pono Sports” (Maui)

Waimea High School – “Historic Waimea Theater” (Kauai)

 

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY (HIGH SCHOOL & MIDDLE SCHOOL COMBINED)

Island School – “Champion Body Boarder” (Kauai)

Hawaii Preparatory Academy – “Waipio Valley Taro” (Hawaii Island)

Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle – “Kula Farmer” (Maui)

Kapaa High School – “Kauai Juice Company” (Kauai)

Maui High School – “School Safety” (Maui)

Waiakea High School – “Two Ladies Kitchen” (Hawaii Island)

Waianae High School – “Water Safety Heroes” (Oahu)

Waipahu High School – “Following Victoria Cuba” (Oahu)

 

BEST OVERALL STORY—MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School – “Plantation Coffee Company” (Kauai)

Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School – “Kaahaaina’s Thanksgiving” (Oahu)

Maui Waena Intermediate School – “Community Service” (Maui)

Waianae Intermediate School – “Beauty and the Beast” (Oahu)

Wheeler Middle School – “Climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro” (Oahu)

 

BEST OVERALL STORY—HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

H.P. Baldwin High School – “Anti-Meth Teen” (Maui)

Konawaena High School – “Sticking With Lacrosse” (Hawaii Island)

Maui High School – “Avalon Angel of ALS” (Maui)

Waiakea High School – “ACL Injuries” (Hawaii Island)

Waianae High School – “Stressed Athlete” (Oahu)

 

HIKI NŌ
Outstanding stories from Spring Quarter 2014/2015

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ highlights is hosted by HIKI NŌ grad Victoria Cuba and features some of the outstanding stories from the Spring Quarter of the 2014/2015 school year:

 

From Waipahu High School on Oahu: a follow-up story on Victoria Cuba. We first met Victoria last season as a senior at Waipahu High School, when she opened up about being homeless. Now, she attends the University of Hawaii at Manoa on a full scholarship and interns at PBS Hawaii. No longer homeless, she resides in a UH dorm, but admits that the transition has had its challenges.

 

From Kapaa High School on Kauai: the story of a new program created by the Kauai Humane Society to encourage the adoption of dogs. Volunteers take dogs from the Kauai Humane Society on field trips to various places on the island to help them meet potential owners.

 

From Ewa Makai Middle School on Oahu: an introduction to P.E. for the 21st century. When students take physical education at this high-tech middle school on the Ewa plain, they don’t just play dodge ball or run laps around the track. We learn how their innovative P.E. program is using computer technology to help students get fit both physically and technologically.

 

From Mid Pacific Institute on Oahu: a profile of Na Hoku Hanohano Award-winning musician Mark Yamanaka. Yamanaka shares one of the biggest challenges of his life – not being of Hawaiian ancestry and wanting to play Hawaiian music.

 

From Moanalua High School on Oahu: the story of Moanalua history teacher Cris Pasquil, who uses non-traditional activities like group projects, skits and even music to instill a love of learning in his students. He draws inspiration from his own experience learning hula under kumu hula Robert Cazimero and his halau’s victory at the esteemed Merrie Monarch Festival earlier this year.

 

From Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island: the story of how their school is trying to develop one of only two high school lacrosse teams on the island. Konawaena teacher Daniel Curran is on a mission to make lacrosse a mainstream sport in Hawaii. Starting a team has many unique challenges, but students say the benefits are worth it.

 

From Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: the story of their experience at the 2015 Student Television Network conference and video competition in San Diego, California. Although the primary purpose of their trip was to participate in the video competition, they also spent a great deal of time volunteering for worthy San Diego-based causes. The Maui Waena students went on to win several awards at the competition, but they consider their hours of community service as the most rewarding part of the trip.

 

HIKI NŌ
hosted by Waialua High and Intermediate School

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Waialua High and Intermediate School on the north shore of Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Why Are There So Many Mexican Restaurants in Kapaa?
Kapaa High School on Kauai explores why there are so many Mexican restaurants – 9, to be exact – in their small town of Kapaa, where there is only one Starbucks. In spite of the availability of so much Mexican food, restaurant owners don’t feel that they are in competition with each other as they offer regional specialties from Mexico that distinguish their offerings. Besides the popularity of Mexican food, the increasing Mexican population in Hawaii may be a reason for the proliferation of restaurants.

 

Also Featured:
Punahou School’s Kaniela Lyman-Mersereau Sails on Hokulea
Middle school students at Punahou School on Oahu feature their teacher, Kaniela Lyman-Mersereau, who recently sailed to New Zealand on Hokulea’s Malama Honua worldwide voyage. Kaniela’s mother was among Hokulea’s original crew, which instilled in him at a young age deep values for the ocean and how important it is to take care of each other.

 

Two Ladies Kitchen in Hilo
Waiakea High School on Hawaii Island visits Two Ladies Kitchen, which serves up over twenty flavors of mochi. The shop started with a family recipe and seven flavors and has grown, making it a popular stop for locals and visitors alike, and where kitchen staff have become family.

 

Pohole Salad A Hana Specialty
Hana K-12 School in East Maui shares how to make pohole salad, a popular dish in Hana that’s served at community gatherings and special events. It’s made from the pohole fern that grows in patches around Hana.

 

Master Storyteller Thomas Cummings
Kalani High School students in East Honolulu feature Uncle Tom Cummings, who has been telling stories for over forty years, weaving Hawaiian culture, mythology, history and values into tales that he started learning as a child. He captivates audiences using objects and “stuff” to illustrate his storytelling.

 

Na Hoku Hano Hano Award Winner Mark Yamanaka
Mid Pacific Institute students in the Manoa district of Oahu had an opportunity to interview award winning Hawaiian musician Mark Yamanaka and listen to his musical stylings. Yamanaka shares one of the biggest challenges of his life – not being of Hawaiian ancestry and wanting to play Hawaiian music.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 16 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, May 17 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Lahaina Intermediate School

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui.

 

Top Story
Students from Damien Memorial School on Oahu tell the story of a high school senior from a military family who, despite his family’s move to another state, decided to stay in Hawaii to complete his final year at Damien.

 
Also Featured
Students at Kamehameha Schools Kapalama on Oahu show how they are using modern technology to perpetuate ancestral Hawaiian knowledge; students at Kalaheo High School on Oahu explore a World World II bunker in the Kalaheo hillside that now shelters a budding, new venture; students at Mid-Pacific Institute on Oahu share the story of Aloha Tofu Factory and the family that has owned and operated the Hawaii food company for three generations;  students at Ewa Makai Middle School on Oahu reveal the recipe for making nutrient-rich garden compost; and students at Maui High School examine Maui’s robust film industry and its impact on the island’s economy.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Lahaina Intermediate School

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui.

 

Top Story
Students from Damien Memorial School on Oahu tell the story of a high school senior from a military family who, despite his family’s move to another state, decided to stay in Hawaii so that he could complete his final year at Damien.

 

Also Featured
Students at Kamehameha Schools Kapalama on Oahu show how they are using modern technology to perpetuate ancestral Hawaiian knowledge; students at Kalaheo High School on Oahu explore a World World II bunker in the Kalaheo hillside that now shelters a budding, new venture; students at Mid-Pacific Institute on Oahu share the story of Aloha Tofu Factory and the family that has owned and operated the Hawaii food company for three generations, students at Ewa Makai Middle School on Oahu reveal the recipe for making nutrient-rich garden compost; and students at Maui High School examine Maui’s robust film industry and its impact on the island’s economy.

 

This program encores Saturday, Nov. 15 at 12:30 pm and Sunday, Nov. 16 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Hosted by Farrington High School

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Farrington High School on Oahu.

 

Top Story:
Students from Iolani School on Oahu tell the story of a young Iolani graduate who, despite becoming a quadruple amputee due to a devastating disease, continues to live life with grace and appreciation. She visits her alma mater, sharing her inspiring message of perseverance.

 

Also Featured:
Students at Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui explore the controversy surrounding  the construction of a new Central Maui Sports Complex; students at Kainalu Elementary School on Oahu profile a Kailua woman who shares the art of ribbon-lei-making with people from around the world; students at Mid-Pacific Institute on Oahu show how science and spiritualism are coming to the aid of a historic Waikiki icon — the Moana Hotel’s majestic banyan tree; students at Lahainaluna High School on Maui share the story of a Lahaina woman who proudly maintains her Hawaiian heritage through pau riding; students at Waiakea High School on Hawaii Island spotlight a locally owned surf company in Kapaa, Kauai that gives back by supporting the community’s sports teams.

 

 

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