military

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Journey Home to the USS Arizona

 

One of the few crew members from the USS Arizona who survived the Pearl Harbor attack, Raymond Haerry Sr., passed away at the age of 94 on September 27, 2016. This documentary follows Haerry’s family as they travel from New Jersey to O‘ahu to place his ashes aboard the sunken battleship.

 

THE DAVID RUBENSTEIN SHOW: PEER TO PEER CONVERSATIONS
David Petraeus Part 2

THE DAVID RUBENSTEIN SHOW: PEER TO PEER CONVERSATIONS - David Petraeus Part 2

 

David Rubenstein interviews General Dave Petraeus. General Petraeus discusses his survival after getting shot in the chest, what to say when a President asks you to do something, his amazement at the breadth of the CIA’s secrets, and his time with two presidents.

 

Part 2
Rubenstein’s interview with General Petraeus continues.

 

The Draft

 

The draft in the 1960s and 1970s was a lightning rod that lit up schisms of race, class and culture in American society. But ending the draft has produced unintended consequences, creating a citizenry disconnected from that of the soldiers who experience the burden of war. The question of who serves in America’s military has shaped battle strategy and foreign policy and stranded Americans in uniform for years on distant battlefields. From the Civil War to the conflicts of the Vietnam era, forced military service has torn the nation apart – and sometimes, as in WWII, united Americans in a common purpose. Featuring interviews with the people who fought the draft, supported it and lived its realities, this program tells the story of how a single, controversial issue continues to define a nation.

 

THE DAVID RUBENSTEIN SHOW: PEER TO PEER CONVERSATIONS
David Petraeus Part 1

 

Rubenstein interviews General Petraeus, who discusses his survival after being shot, what to say when the president asks you to do something, his amazement at the breadth of the CIA’s secrets and his time with two presidents.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
War for Guam

 

War for Guam traces the enduring legacy from World War II in Guam, a U.S. territory since 1898, and how the native people of Guam, the Chamorros, remained loyal to the U.S. under Japanese occupation, only to be later stripped of much of their ancestral lands by the American military. Through rare archival footage, contemporary film, and testimonies of survivors and their descendants, the story is told from various points of view, including from war survivors like Antonio Artero, Jr., whose father was awarded one of the first Medals of Freedom for his heroic deeds in protecting American lives; and two key historical figures, Radioman George Tweed and Father Jesus Baza Duenas.

 

1 2 3 7