Moanalua High School

HIKI NŌ
Episode #1005 – Breaking Gender Norms and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

“Breaking Gender Norms”
Students from McKinley High School on O‘ahu introduce us to their school’s quarterback, who happens to be a female. On August 19, 2017, McKinley sophomore Alexandria Buchanan became the first female varsity quarterback to start a game in Hawai‘i. She recounts her progress from playing on the junior varsity team as a freshman to becoming the starting quarterback on the varsity team. “I’m proud I got this far,” says Buchanan, “I never expected to be on the varsity level, let alone starting as their quarterback. I take a lot of pride in it. I take a lot of pride in having my team and my coaches trust in me.” McKinley’s football coach and its athletic director also discuss how more and more females have been playing football in recent years, challenging the old perception that it is a sport strictly for men.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui, introduce us to a female intermediate school student who inspires younger students to embrace the wonders of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math).

 

–Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i give us an inside look at their school’s building construction class.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu shine a spotlight on a downtown-Honolulu arts organization: The Arts at Marks Garage.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui High School introduce us to a young woman who has created a program that helps other young women build self-confidence and separate their sense of self-worth from social media.

 

–Students from Waimea High School on Kaua‘i present a profile in courage: a young girl who defeated cancer and gained strength and ambition from the experience.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2018 Special, Part 3 of 4

HIKI NŌ Class of 2018 — Part 3 of 4

 

This is the third of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2018 gathered at PBS Hawai‘i to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

Part 3 features Katherine Swor, who graduated from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui and is now majoring in elementary education at Saint Martin’s College in Lacey, Washington; Caleb Casinas, who graduated from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu and is now majoring in accounting and management at Norwich University in Vermont; and Haven Luper-Jasso, who graduated from Kaua‘i High School in Līhu‘e and is now majoring in film production at Chapman University in Orange, California.

 

 

To start the show, each graduate shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Katherine presents her story “Bi-Polar Artist,” about a young woman who uses her art to express herself and cope with her bi-polar disorder. Caleb shows “Heart Over Height,” about a high school student who excels in soccer, despite the physical limitations brought on by a rare form of dwarfism. Haven presents her story “Bethany Hamilton,” which she created as a 7th grader at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School, about the Kaua‘i surfer who became a celebrity after losing an arm in a shark attack.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #905 – Vietnam War veteran Bobbie Paik

 

TOP STORY
Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i tell the story of Vietnam War veteran Bobbie Paik, a Purple Heart recipient who suffers from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). A major source of Mr. Paik’s PTSD was the fact that twenty-two soldiers in his company were killed during the six months they were together. “…it’s kinda hard, you know, I getting a Purple Heart, and friend from Maui, he went home in a box,” says Paik. Paik discusses the various ways in which he copes with this PTSD, including restoring classic cars.

 

ALSO FEATURED
–Students from Kapolei High School on O‘ahu show us how Girl Scouts keep pedestrians in Makakilo safe.

 

–Students from Aiea High School O‘ahu show us the proper way to fold a T-shirt.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on the Kona side of Hawai‘i Island introduce us to an alumnus who was part of the recent Nobel-prize-winning project that measured the change in gravitational waves, proving Einstein’s theory of relativity.

 

–Students from Waimea High School in West Kaua‘i tell the story of a sausage vendor who has found great success with his kalua pork-topped hot dogs.

 

–Students from Aliamanu Middle School on O‘ahu profile a Hawai‘i-based Chinese American filmmaker and her eight-year-long journey to complete her documentary on another Hawai‘i-based Chinese American woman from an earlier era who had produced the first Academy-Award-winning documentary.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu present a character study on a homeless surfer who is always there to lend a helping hand to his fellow surfers.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 1, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 2, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 918: Jerome Ribao and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui trace a fellow student’s road to recovery after he was hit by a drunk driver. In May 2017, Baldwin senior Jerome Ribao suffered a severe leg injury from the accident. Despite this setback, Jerome found ways to remain active. After graduation, Jerome plans to continue to work toward his career goal of becoming an auto mechanic.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Aliamanu Middle School on O‘ahu explore the fears and anxieties faced by students transitioning from elementary to middle school. (From the HIKI NŌ archives.)

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu profile a marching band director who encourages students not to be the best students in the world, but to be the best people for the world. (From the HIKI NŌ archives.)

 

–Students from Waimea High School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a Waimea graduate who became a successful t-shirt artist and returned to his home-town to give back to his community. (From the HIKI NŌ archives.)

 

–Students from Montessori School of Maui in Makawao show how to create a device that will occupy and entertain cats for hours on end.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on Hawai‘i Island show how a sport with origins from Native American Indians is growing in popularity on their island.

 

–And students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a quadriplegic artist who has developed a unique way of painting. (From the HIKI NŌ archives.)

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Kapa‘a Middle School in Līhu‘e, Kaua‘i.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 914 – Top Story: The Many Faces of Hope

 

This week’s episode of HIKI NŌ spotlights seven of the most outstanding stories from the winter quarter of the 2017-2018 school year. The seven selected stories also share a common theme: hope. The island residents featured in this show each express personal hopes for themselves, their families and their communities. Each one is on a mission to turn that hope into reality.

 

THE STORIES:

–Students from Hongwanji Mission School on O‘ahu go off-the-air with Billy V, a local media celebrity who opens up about the physical and emotional journey that’s accompanied his cancer treatment. Billy V expresses his hope to recover from cancer and continue his fulfilling life and work.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu go aboard the Hōkūle‘a voyaging canoe to show us how the current crew is teaching ancient navigation techniques to a new generation. In this story, Master Navigator Nainoa Thompson shares his hope that younger Hawaiians will take up the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s mission of perpetuating traditional voyaging and the spirit of exploration.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School take us to Noho‘ana Farm in Waikapū to meet a man who is preserving his heritage and his culture by restoring his family’s ancient taro farm. He hopes to share his knowledge and instill a sense of kuleana in younger Hawaiians so they can continue the tradition of kalo farming into the future.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on the Big Island relay the inspirational story of a teacher who hiked the Pacific Crest Trail – from Mexico to Canada – as part of her recovery from the trauma of sexual assault. She hopes this challenge will help her take back control of her body and her life.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu show us how a high school athlete hopes to overcome his short stature to pursue his dream of playing varsity soccer.

 

–Students from Waiākea High School in Hilo on the Big Island introduce us to a man who’s spreading his motto: “Stay Humble, Pray.” This former prisoner visits Hawai‘i high schools to share his story of drug addiction in the hope of persuading students not to make the mistakes he made.

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului introduce us to a family learning to embrace what life brings after their baby is born with the genetic disorder known as Down Syndrome. The Garcias of Pukalani hope their love and devotion will guarantee their daughter’s happiness. And they hope to share their blessings and inspire their neighbors through their family company, Aloha Kettlecorn.

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ is hosted by two students from Farrington High School on O‘ahu: 9th grader Shaylen Tatupu-Timu and 10th grader Harvey Saucedo.

 

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode # 913: 2018 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge

 

On Friday January 26, 2018, student teams from twenty middle and high schools took on the 2018 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge. The students had four days to conceptualize, shoot, write, record voiceovers for, and edit a story expressing the theme “A Special Place.” Teachers were allowed to make suggestions to their students, but they were not allowed to provide any hands-on help (no shooting, sound recording, writing, or editing). The theme was announced at the beginning of the four-day challenge, so no pre-planning was possible before then.

 

Eight of the best stories from the challenge will be featured:

 

–“Shige’s Saimin Stand” by Moanalua High School (O‘ahu)

Inspired by childhood memories of his grandparent’s saimin stand in Haleiwa, Ross Shigeoka opened Shige’s Saimin Stand twenty-eight years ago in Wahiawa. It has since developed into a home for members of the community to gather and carry out the traditions of enjoying Shige’s homemade saimin and hamburgers. What started out as a business has become a focal point for families from Wahiawa and beyond.

 

–“Taro Farming” by Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School (Maui)

Hōkūao Pellegrino of Nohū‘ano Farms dedicates his life to restoring ancient taro patches that his family began cultivating in Waikapū, Maui back in the 16th century. He hosts approximately one thousand students every year to teach them about the relevance of kalo in the Hawaiian culture and how to mālama (care for) the natural resources that provide for this important crop.

 

–“Cafeteria” by Nānākuli High and Intermediate School (O‘ahu)

The story of how the cafeteria at Nānākuli High and Intermediate School doubles as the home of the Nānākuli Performing Arts Company (NPAC), an organization that transforms lives by providing a sense of family, self-esteem and pride for its performers, mentors, alumni and audience members.

 

–“A Special Piece of Home” by Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i)

A personal essay featuring a high school graduate about to head off to college on the mainland who reflects on the things she will miss about her island home of Kaua‘i.

 

–“Volcanoes National Park” by Volcano School of Arts & Science (Hawai‘i Island)

A young man talks about the stories of Hawaiian gods and goddesses he has learned at Volcanoes National Park, which has sparked his curiosity to learn more about the Hawaiian culture. He also reflects on the incredible natural beauty he has experienced at the park, particularly around Halema‘uma‘u Crater.

 

–“Agnes’ Portuguese Bake Shop” by Kalaheo High School (O‘ahu)

Agnes’ Portuguese Bake Shop has been a Kailua gathering place for forty-seven years. Longtime patrons reminisce about what the bake shop has meant to them as, sadly, it prepares to close its doors for good.

 

–“Affordable Housing” by Maui Waena Intermediate School (Maui)

The Lokahi Foundation, a non-profit housing and community development organization, has just completed a development of affordable homes in the Happy Valley area of Wailuku, Maui. As the new homeowners move in, these individual “special places” come together to form a neighborhood of people bound together by the shared desire to create safe, happy homes for their families.

(Middle School winner of the 2018 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge)

 

–“Teen Parent Center” by Maui High School (Maui)

While attending Baldwin High School, fifteen year-old Jada Apolo became a teen mother. The responsibilities of motherhood made continuing high school close to impossible, until she transferred to Maui High School, one of three public schools in Hawai‘i to offer on-campus childcare and a teen parent program. This enabled Jada to continue with high school, but a recent spike in the number of incoming freshman caused a shortage of resources that threatened to close Maui High’s teen parent program. Jada launched a community awareness/support campaign that she hopes will lead to funding for an alternative teen parent program for her and other teen moms in the area.

(High School winner of the 2018 HIKI NŌ Winter Challenge)

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 910: Top Story – Kyle Quilausing’s motto: “Stay Humble, Pray”

 

TOP STORY

Students from Waiākea High School in Hilo on the Big Island introduce us to a man who’s spreading his motto: “Stay Humble, Pray.” This philosophy grew out of Kyle Quilausing’s experience during a decade in prison. He now shares his story of drug addiction and the consequences – with Hawai‘i high school students in hopes they can avoid his fate. “Quilly” puts on shackles when he visits schools because he believes showing has greater impact than just telling.  He says his greatest accomplishment is the feedback he gets from students who tell him he has persuaded them not to try drugs.

 

ALSO FEATURED

–Students from Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu show us how a varsity wrestler is excelling at his sport when the small sophomore may look like he is in way over his head.

 

–Students from McKinley High School on O‘ahu explain their “Ignition” mentoring program, and how it is helping anxious incoming freshmen make a smooth transition to high school.

 

–Students from Island School in Līhu‘e on Kaua‘i introduce us to two of their fellow students – brothers who are pushing the boundaries of business and technology as high-tech entrepreneurs.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Upcountry Maui teach us to play the ancient Hawaiian game of konane.

 

–Students from Ilima Intermediate School in ‘Ewa Beach on O‘ahu profile mural artist Hilton Alves who is giving back to Hawai‘i schools while fulfilling his own goal to create 101 waves on walls.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu profile a fitness buff and nutrition advocate who keeps motivating others while going through her own battle with cancer.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 908

 

TOP STORY:

Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu go aboard the Hōkūle‘a voyaging canoe, back from its celebrated worldwide voyage. They show us how the current crew is teaching traditional navigation techniques to a new generation and how this experience is connecting Hawaiian students to their culture. In this story, Master Navigator Nainoa Thompson talks about the importance of relaying ancient practices and wisdom from his generation to the next. These skills and knowledge will prepare younger Hawaiians to take up the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s mission of perpetuating traditional voyaging and the spirit of exploration. Kristyn Kailewa, a 15-year-old, is one of the young people eagerly taking up that challenge.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i introduce us to a middle school student who has been motivated by her own homeless experience to pay it forward and now inspires others to volunteer.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu show us how a high school athlete is going beyond his physical limitations to pursue his dream of playing soccer.

 

–Students from Kalani High School in East O‘ahu teach us simple steps to help shake off the stress of school and life.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School introduce us to a Maui woman who has turned her lifelong love of dogs into a career training therapy dogs to help people get through tough times.

 

–Students from Saint Francis School in Manoa on O‘ahu explain how hula goes far beyond dance for the reigning Miss Aloha Hula, Kelina Eldridge.

 

–Students from Hongwanji Mission School on O‘ahu go off-the-air with Billy V – a local celebrity who opens up about the emotional journey that’s accompanied his physical recovery from cancer surgery.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #823

 

This episode features stories from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge, in which production teams from HIKI NŌ schools took the challenge of creating stories on the theme Mālama Honua (Taking Care of Our Island Planet) over three days. The theme – which is based on the mission of the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s world-wide voyage – was revealed to the students at the beginning of the three-day production time limit.

 

TOP STORY
Students from Nānākuli High and Intermediate School on O‘ahu present their interpretation of Mālama Honua in a story about Veronika Sumyatina, a foreign exchange student from war-torn Ukraine who finds a new home, and the meaning of aloha, at Nānākuli High and Intermediate School. Veronika explains that home is much more than a roof over one’s head – home is “where your heart is.” By accepting an outsider as one of their own, the Nānākuli students do their part in taking care of our island planet.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu feature a female angler whose love of fishing is matched only by her respect for the eco-system from which she partakes.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu follow a woman who volunteers to mend and replace the pedestrian walking flags that keep people safe when crossing the very dangerous Farrington Highway.

 

–Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu feature the OSPCA, a non-profit organization that cares for abandoned and neglected cats and dogs.

 

–Students from Punahou School on O‘ahu follow a group of motivated community members who are cleaning up Kawainui Marsh in Kailua.

 

–Students from Kalama Intermediate School in Upcountry Maui show how recycling is a way of life on their campus.

 

–Students from Kapolei High School on O‘ahu follow the eco-friendly phenomenon of Hydro Flasks.

 

This episode is hosted by Hali‘amaile Kealoha and Hulukoa Nunokawa, both seniors at Kamehameha School Kapālama.

 

This program encores Sunday, Nov. 12, at 12:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #824

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ highlights some of the best stories from the spring quarter of the 2016-2017 school year. The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this compilation show include:

 

“Mochi Pounding” from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui:
The story of a Maui family who continues their annual New Year’s tradition of mochi pounding, despite the recent passing of the family matriarch.

 

“Tough Vice-Principal” from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu:
A classic “don’t judge a book by its cover” story about a vice-principal whose tough exterior belies her heart of gold.

 

“Fashion Entrepreneurs” from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu:
Two Honolulu-based fashion entrepreneurs mentor young local designers who are trying to break into the business.

 

“Tie-Dye Artist” from Kalani High School in East Honolulu:
Inspired by 1960s cultural icons like The Beatles, a Honolulu teenager launches her own line of tie-dye clothing.

 

“Diabetic Athlete” from Waiakea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island:
A star high school athlete faces his toughest opponent off the court: Type 1 Diabetes.

 

“Pedestrian Walking Flags” from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu:
A woman takes it upon herself to sew red flags that are held up by pedestrians as they cross the notoriously dangerous crosswalks in Waiʻanae. The red flags go a long way in alerting drivers that there are pedestrians crossing in front of them.

 

“The Fact of You” from Kaua‘i High School in Lihue:
A personal essay about identifying one’s authentic nature and remaining true to it.

 

“Ukrainian Student” from Nānākuli High and Intermediate School in West O‘ahu:
The story of a foreign exchange student from Ukraine who embraces and reciprocates the Aloha Spirit she finds in Nānākuli.

 

This special compilation show is hosted by Moanalua High School student Camryn Tabiolo, who will be entering her school’s HIKI NŌ program in the fall of 2017.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 2, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 3, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

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