music

VICTORIA & ALBERT: The Wedding
Part 1 of 2

VICTORIA & ALBERT: The Wedding - Lucy Worsley

 

Lucy Worsley introduces the team of experts who will join her in reconstructing the wedding that changed history. As they get ready for the ceremony and investigate the stories behind the dress, the food and the music, they uncover surprising details while the reality of their enormous undertaking comes into focus. As they labor, Lucy and her co-presenters reveal the backstory of the most romantic of all Royal romances, a tale of tragedy, scandal, intrigue – with a whiff of revolution.

 

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NĀ MELE
The Leo Nahenahe Singers

The Leo Nahenahe Sisters on Na Mele

 

“Leo nahenahe” is Hawaiian for “soft and sweet.” Now in their eighties, The Leo Nahenahe Singers celebrate over 50 years of performing together on this episode of NĀ MELE. Ethelynne Teves on guitar, Noelani Mahoe on ukulele and Mona Teves on upright bass accompany their instruments with their soft and sweet vocals. These Nā Hokū and Hawaiian Music Hall of Fame honorees perform Hawaiian classics like “Hanohano Wale No” and “Koni Au I Ka Wai.”

 

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LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX
Nani Lim Yap

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX: Nani Lim Yap

 

Musician, singer and dancer Nani Lim Yap tells how her Lim family’s music grew from an entertaining pastime to a career that takes them around the world to perform. She also reminisces about her upbringing in Kohala, Hawai‘i Island, and the way she keeps the traditions and stories of her ancestors alive as a kumu hula.

 

This program will be rebroadcast on Sunday, Jan. 27, at 4:00 pm and 11:30 pm.

 

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NĀ MELE
More! Ledward Kaapana and Family

 

Ledward Kaapana remembers his Uncle Fred Punahoa playing the song “Radio Hula” in Kalapana: “In the morning, like one, two o’clock in the morning. In Kalapana, it’s so quiet, so… you know, and it’s dark, and so, he used to just sit outside on the porch, and play his guitar. I don’t know if you ever experienced sleeping…and hear one guitar just playing sweet music that just wake you up and like, ‘Oh, so sweet,’” Kaapana remembers. “Radio Hula” is one of the songs that Ledward Kaapana, along with his sisters Lehua Nash, Rhoda Kekona, and Lei Aken play in his Kaneohe garage on a rainy evening. They also share an energetic slack key performance of “Kuu Ipo Onaona,” and Ledward honors the late Dennis Kamakahi with “Kokee.”

 

 

NĀ MELE
Peter Medeiros

NA MELE Peter Medeiros

 

Slack key artist Peter Medeiros, accompanied by guitarist Josh Silva and bass player Nate Stillman, presents a fun evening of traditional slack key. Joining the trio are the dancers of Pua Ali‘i ‘Ilima, led by kumu hula Vicky and Jeff Kānekaiwilani Takamine. Songs performed include “Ulili E,” “He‘eia,” “Ke Ala O Ka Rose” and “Kananaka.”

 

 

 

GREAT PERFORMANCES
The Cleveland Orchestra Centennial Celebration

GREAT PERFORMANCES: The Cleveland Orchestra Centennial Celebration

 

The Cleveland Orchestra is considered one of the world’s most highly regarded music ensembles. Led by music director Franz Welser-Möst, it will offer two concert performances of Richard Strauss’s “Daphne” on July 15th and 18th at Avery Fisher Hall. It will also perform two additional programs, featuring works by Messiaen, Dvorák, Beethoven, and Strauss, on July 16th and 17th at the same venue.

 

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Royal Talent
The Lim Family of Kohala, Hawai‘i Island
Cover Story by Liberty Peralta

Siblings Sonny Lim, Nani Lim Yap, Lorna Lim and Leialoha Lim Amina

 

Cover Story: Royal Talent, The Lim Family of Kohala, Hawai‘i Island

By Liberty Peralta, PBS Hawai‘i

 

Royalty and talent. Chances are, it’s rare you’ve met someone – much less an entire family – who could truly lay claim to both.

 

For the Lim Family of Kohala, Hawai‘i Island, royalty and talent course through their veins.

 

The Lims’ lineage can be traced back to Alapa‘i Nui, the chief who once ruled Hawai‘i Island. As the birthplace of King Kamehameha the Great, and the residence of high chiefs (ali‘i nui), the Kohala district is featured in many ancestral stories.

 

“Kohala’s history had a lot of royalty,” says Lorna Lim. “A lot of the families still exist today. They keep family stories alive through chants and mele.”

 

The musically talented Lims are one of those families, with each family member well-versed in music, chants and hula. The six Lim siblings are: Leialoha Lim Amina, Nani Lim Yap, Charmaine “Minnie” Lim Davis, Elmer Jr. “Sonny” Lim, Lorna Lim and James “Kimo” K.H. Lim. Kimo died in a helicopter accident in 1997.

 

Their mother, the late singer Mary Ann Lim, was hired as a cook, then as an entertainer, at the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel in the 1960s. Naturally, the performances became a family affair.

 

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX. Get to know two Lim family members through in-depth conversations: entertainer and kumu hula Nani Lim Yap and her son, fashion designer and hula practitioner Manaola Yap.To this day, the Lim children continue to carry the family’s musical torch. Nani, Sonny and Lorna still perform regularly at Mauna Kea Beach Hotel, as well as the nearby Mauna Lani Hotel. They also frequent Japan to perform, and have traveled as far as Europe to entertain audiences.

 

“We’re real grassroots,” says Nani, whose husband Ed Yap is also an integral part of this musical family. “We’ve not really advertised what we do, who we are. I think it’s just [people] seeing what we do.”

 

This month, PBS Hawai‘i viewers can see for themselves what the Lim family can do. A new episode of Nā Mele: Traditions in Hawaiian Song, recorded in our Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Multimedia Studio, features the Lims in a new setting, but a familiar scene: surrounded by music and family. Among the songs they perform are: “Ka‘anoi Pua-Pua Olena,” “Lei Ana O Kohala,” “He Hene Ahahana,” “Ka Wahine O Ka Lua” and “Pau Hana Rag.” Among the featured hula dancers are: Leialoha Lim Amina; Lorna’s daughter Wehi; and Nani’s daughter Asia.

 

NĀ MELE: Traditions in Hawaiian Song | Monday, January 28,7:30 pm

 

There’s more. In a new episode of Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, Nani Lim Yap reminisces about growing up with her siblings on Parker Ranch, going on long rides in the family’s Rambler station wagon, and overcoming stage fright. “I performed before as a dancer, but not as a singer,” she explains. “I could not look at the crowd.” Today, in addition to her regular Kohala hotel gigs with Sonny and Lorna, Nani is also an accomplished kumu hula.

 

And in a Long Story Short encore, we revisit our conversation with Nani’s son, Manaola Yap. A fashion designer who made a splash at the 2017 New York Fashion Week, he’s also a musician, hula practitioner and chanter.

 

“I do not name myself to be a designer that went to school and did all of that because that’s not me,” Manaola says. “I specifically come from the background and the understanding of the traditions of hula and the dance in its most traditional element.”

 

It all comes back to the Lims’ commitment to tradition and storytelling. “Hula, it is bringing those words to a living form,” says Lorna. “And then you realize that mele are portals back in time. You bring this song [from the past] back to life, and come right back here to our time.”

 

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX: Guest Manaola Yap will be broadcast Tuesday, January 15, 7:30 pm. Guest Lani Lim Yapʻs show will be broadcast Tuesday, January 22, 7:30 pm

 

 

 

 

NĀ MELE
The Royal Hawaiian Band

NA MELE Royal Hawaiian Band

 

Founded in 1836 by King Kamehameha III, the Royal Hawaiian Band has
provided audiences the world over with a continual connection to Hawai‘i’s
royal heritage. During this vintage concert set on the grounds of historic
Iolani Palace, Bandmaster Aaron Mahi pays tribute to one of his predecessors,
Henry Berger, Royal Hawaiian Bandmaster from 1871 to 1915 and sometimes called
the “Father of Hawaiian music.”

 

 

LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER
New York Philharmonic New Year’s Eve with Renée Fleming

LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER: New York Philharmonic New Year’s Eve with Renée Fleming

 

A New Year’s Eve tradition continues with the New York Philharmonic, led by Music Director Jaap van Zweden, welcoming opera great Renée Fleming. From the great waltzes and polkas of Johann Strauss II to musical pearls from composers Stephen Sondheim and Kander and Ebb, the Philharmonic conjures the splendor of a night at the ball.

 

 

 

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