New Home

PBS Hawaiʻi’s New Home

 

Welcome to PBS Hawaiʻi’s New Home, the Clarence T.C. Ching Campus


Here is PBS Hawaiʻi’s open-concept new home, designed for collaboration, transparency and flexibility.

 

 

In May of 2016, we moved into the two-story building at the corner of Nimitz Highway and Sand Island Access Road in Honolulu. It functions beautifully as a place to create, acquire and distribute stories that matter to the islands that we serve.

 

 

Interior square footage is 30,000 square feet, which includes a large television/multimedia studio and a smaller second studio which doubles as PBS Hawaiʻi’s Board Room. There also is ample, cheerful space in which to hold events and meet with community members.

 

We are ever grateful to the people of Hawaiʻi and others who provided this place where people and ideas come together.

 

Our sincere and heartfelt Mahalo to our supporters, the people of Hawai‘i

 


 

Large Photos of PBS Hawai‘i’s New Home

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PBS Hawai‘i opens doors to new home

PBS Hawaii

 

HONOLULU, HI – Hawai‘i’s statewide public television station today opened its new home to the public, after a blessing ceremony and donor thank-you event this morning.PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO Leslie Wilcox and Board Chair Robbie Alm untie the maile at this morning’s blessing ceremony and donor thank-you event at the public television station’s new home at 315 Sand Island Access Road in Honolulu. Photo: PBS Hawai‘i

 

PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO Leslie Wilcox and Board Chair Robbie Alm untie the maile at this morning’s blessing ceremony and donor thank-you event at the public television station’s new home at 315 Sand Island Access Road in Honolulu. Photo: PBS Hawai‘i

 

PBS Hawai‘i’s new home, The Clarence T.C. Ching Campus at 315 Sand Island Access Road fronting Nimitz Highway, is a $30 million facility, the result of a successful capital campaign. Construction was completed on time and on budget. The building features three multimedia studios; the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Learning Zone, which includes the home base of the station’s statewide student news network, HIKI NŌ; and open work spaces with cheerful colors and natural light.

 

Event attendees included three multi-million dollar funders of the building – the State government, The Clarence T.C. Ching Foundation, and the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation. PBS Hawai‘i is offering tours of the building to all donors, large and small, totaling more than 2,000 people and organizations.

 

“We felt deeply the trust and aloha that people have in PBS Hawai‘i as an important part of this community,” said Board Chair Robbie Alm. “They reached out and supported the diversity of perspectives that we present and the fairness they find here.”

 

President and CEO Leslie Wilcox said, “We can’t thank the people of Hawai‘i enough. This new home reflects the values of people throughout the state and a vision for a closer relationship with our communities. The building design supports collaboration, creativity, culture and context.”

 

The mission of the educational media organization is to advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches lives.

 

The two-story, 32,000 square-foot building was designed by architect Sheryl Seaman of Group 70 International. The general contractor was Allied Builders System, and Cumming served as owner’s representative.

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release:

 

Contact: Liberty Peralta
Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.462.5030

 

PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

Raising the Bar – The Best Way to Express Our Gratitude

Viewer thank you note

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiMy job is essentially to be a problem-solver. There’s certainly enough to reach for, as the fragmented worlds of media and education require more focus, more engagement, more depth, more context. And in this rapidly changing world, answers are a moving target.

 

But that’s not the toughest part of my job. As in other things in life, the simplest things can be the most difficult. And quite simply, it is very difficult to adequately express thanks.

 

Our unpaid Board of Directors and lean staff could spend most of the day writing thank-you letters or making calls – and it simply wouldn’t be enough to express the gratitude we feel here for what citizens are supporting.

 

After we lost our lease at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, the people of Hawai‘i and several mainland-based charitable foundations with ties to Hawaii gave us more than $30 million to establish a modern stand-alone multimedia center on Nimitz Highway at the entrance to Sand Island, PBS Hawai‘i’s Clarence T.C. Ching Campus. This nonprofit now owns an acre of land and a two-story building, which (thankfully) came in on time and on budget.

 

And still, after building us a new house, some viewers thank us. Here’s an example, from a woman who wrote by hand: “I hope you don’t get tired of my thank-you notes but I gotta say how much it means to me to watch [PBS Hawai‘i].” Here’s another hand-written note: “PBS Hawai‘i is contributing to society. I want PBS to continue this way. That’s why I make my donation.”

 

See what I mean? With a heart full of gratitude, I want you to know that we are dedicated to making the most out of your gift of a new building and your support of programming. We want to raise the bar on our stories and in quality in all areas, including our events for adults and keiki. We want to “be there” for our state – all of it, not just metropolitan Oahu. We want to be trusted for fairness and accuracy. And when we make mistakes, we want to own up and do better. Maybe that’s the best way to convey our thanks.

 

Also, we’re offering all the thousands of building donors a guided tour of the television station. Next month, after we complete technical troubleshooting, install a photovoltaic energy system and add donor signage, we’ll have an opening ceremony. But because of space concerns, we can’t invite all who made the building possible. So we invite NEW HOME donors to arrange a personal tour, now or later, by calling Christina Sumida at (808) 462-5045. Quite simply, we’d like to thank you in person.

 

Mahalo piha,
Leslie signature

 

Glorious New Home – and Soon, Bright New Ways to Enjoy Content

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiIt’s one thing to see a building on a blueprint or in construction infancy. It’s another thing to finally enter the real deal.

 

So how is it?

 

In a word, glorious.

 

It feels great to walk in the PBS Hawai‘i’s The Clarence T.C. Ching Campus and get to work. Open space, glass walls, cheerful colors, creative shapes, lots of natural light, a sense of whimsy. It’s an environment that promotes collaboration and teamwork by providing a range of contemporary meeting places. The building also is designed to keep everyone informed, with monitors throughout the building showing current programming and ongoing social media. PBS children’s characters have their own little neighborhood. With all of the vantage points, everyone can keep an eye on what’s going on in the beating heart of the new home – the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Multimedia Studio and the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Learning Zone.

 

We were fortunate to have top professionals fleshing out the vision of an open, collaborative workplace. Kudos to our architect, Group 70 International’s Sheryl Seaman, and her team; Justin Izumi from general contractor Allied Builders System, an employee-owned company; and our owner’s reps, Andrew Tanton from Cumming, with Jennifer Camp.

 

The project has been built, on time and on budget, but there’s more to do. We’ll spend the summer troubleshooting major new technology systems; adding a photovoltaic system; and creating donor signage to acknowledge givers who made the building possible. We’re offering small group tours of the building to interested donors who made this new home possible.

 

As our Board Chair Robbie Alm pointed out, many individuals and families wanted to help and to have their names associated with this place for integrity and civility in public affairs, education and the arts. PBS Hawai‘i heard from a stunning number of grassroots givers – 1,500 donors. Thank you so much!

 

You can see our terrific donors’ names online, and many of the names also will be inscribed on the walls of the new home. We look forward to acknowledging them.

 

Next time, I’d like to tell you about two highly regarded content executives here, Linda Brock and Jason Suapaia. They will lead our charge in producing more content focusing on this place we call home – and they will bring you more ways to enjoy the content.

 

Home is here! Mahalo piha…
Leslie signature

 

Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation grants $2 million for PBS Hawai‘i’s new home

PBS Hawaii

 

HONOLULU, HI – A large grant from the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation has propelled PBS Hawai‘i to within $200,000 of its $30 million goal for its new home at 315 Sand Island Access Road.

 

The $2 million grant to Hawai‘i’s statewide public television station will provide facilities for education through storytelling, and workforce development. The foundation’s focus is helping those who are vulnerable and at-risk.

 

From left: Ben Nishimoto, PBS Hawai‘i Vice President of Advancement; Corbett Kalama, Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation Vice President of Real Estate Investments and Community Affairs; Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO; Gailene Wong, Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation Grant Director; Robbie Alm, PBS Hawai‘i Board Chair; Bettina Mehnert, PBS Hawai‘i Board Secretary; Jason Fujimoto, PBS Hawai‘i Board Vice Chair.

 

“Harry Weinberg was thoughtful and considerate of those in our community who are less fortunate,” said Corbett Kalama, Vice President of Real Estate Investments and Community Affairs at the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation. “PBS Hawai‘i provides opportunities for youngsters in Hawaii to be creative and be a part of something that helps them be better people.”

 

The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation is naming the building’s two largest areas: its main Multimedia Studio, where PBS Hawai‘i productions will be produced; and the Learning Zone, the open area at the heart of the second floor built for collaborative projects with filmmakers, students, teachers and others in the community.

 

PBS Hawai‘i staff reported to work at the new building at the beginning of the month, and is currently troubleshooting its new technological systems.

 

PBS Hawai‘i Board Chair Robbie Alm stated: “We share with [the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation] a deep and abiding desire to see those who begin life with less have the greatest opportunities possible to change their lives. At PBS Hawai‘i’s new home, every person and especially every young person can find their own future based on their own talents, dreams and ambitions. Their opportunities are, thanks to this gift, without limit.”

 

Naming opportunities, including spots on our two donor walls, are still available. More information is online at PBSHawaii.org/newhome.

 

Download this Press Release

 

For questions regarding this press release:

 

Contact: Liberty Peralta
Email: lperalta@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1383

 

PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

Neighborly Gifts that Hit the Spot

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiIf you’re lucky, there’s someone in your life who always comes up with a perfect gift–and often it’s an item that’s not even on your radar.

 

We sometimes feel that way at PBS Hawaii, with people helping us in ways that we don’t expect.

 

There are especially thoughtful people on Neighbor Islands. We send our “free” broadcast signals farther than those of any commercial TV station to reach more people, and Neighbor Islanders reach back.

 

Here are two recent examples, beginning with Kauai woodworker Dean Mayer:

 

—“I made a lot of sawdust, that’s how I made it.”

 

Dean is humbly explaining how he crafted a beautiful, rich-grained lobby desk for PBS Hawaii’s future home. It’s in his Omao workshop, ready to be shipped to Honolulu.

 

Kauai woodworker Dean Mayer created this reception desk for PBS Hawaii's future lobby.

Kauai woodworker Dean Mayer created this reception desk for PBS Hawaii’s future lobby.

 

The wood is from a large monkey pod tree that had to be cut down because its growth was threatening the safety of a home on the Koloa property of his friend, Dan Suga.

 

Dean says he was moved to make the desk because he enjoys PBS Hawaii programming.

 

Everyone who enters our future home will see Dean’s creation as soon as they open the door. We hope you’ll come and visit.

 

—“Everyone loved seeing Downton Abbey on the big screen.”

 

That’s Susan Bendon of Spreckelsville, Maui, talking about a “pop-up” screening she gamely pulled off with little notice. Taking time out from the busy holiday season, a group of Maui residents watched the highly anticipated premiere of Downton Abbey’s fi nal season more than a week before television viewers were able to see it. Susan, a PBS Hawaii Board Member, enlisted Seabury Hall’s Lynn Matayoshi and they presented the episode in the school’s comfortable auditorium.

 

Top Left: On Maui, PBS supporter Ann Jones and PBS Hawaii Board Member Susan Bendon, greet guests at an advance screening of Downton Abbey at Seabury Hall. Top-right: Maui Magazine publisher Diane Haynes Woodburn at the Downton Abbey advance screening.
Top Left: On Maui, PBS supporter Ann Jones and PBS Hawaii Board Member Susan Bendon, greet guests at an advance screening of Downton Abbey at Seabury Hall. Top-right: Maui Magazine publisher Diane Haynes Woodburn at the Downton Abbey advance screening.
 

In Honolulu, we worked with Ward Consolidated Theatres to give an advance screening for fans.

 

“PBS made many friends,” Susan said. See what I mean? With Lynn, Susan made it happen.

 

With Dan Suga’s tree, Dean made it happen. We are lucky indeed.

 

Aloha a hui hou,

Leslie signature

 

Two-Year $50,000 Grant from Central Pacific Bank Foundation to PBS Hawaii for NEW HOME

Press Release Header

 

HONOLULU, HI —The Central Pacific Bank Foundation has made a two-year, $50,000 donation to PBS Hawaii for the renovation and construction of the public television station’s new facility.

 

Pictured from left to right are CPB Senior VP and General Counsel Glenn Ching; CPB Foundation President Denis Isono; Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawaii CEO; PBS Hawaii Board Members Bettina Mehnert and Kent Tsukamoto.

 

Construction of PBS Hawaii’s 21st-century NEW HOME, The Clarence T.C. Ching Campus, began in November 2014, and is rising in a graceful curve on Nimitz Highway at the entrance to Sand Island. Hawaii’s only public television station is in the homestretch of capital fundraising, having reached over $26.5 of a $30 million campaign goal.

 

The structure will house a main television studio, a “Learning Zone” for students and teachers, and spaces that promote collaboration and partnerships for innovation.

 

“We are honored to support organizations such as PBS Hawaii that share our commitment to create a better Hawaii,” said CPB Foundation President Denis Isono. “PBS Hawaii already does great work within our state, and the new facility will help to further their reach by enhancing programming and providing additional learning opportunities.”

 

“It is such a great honor to receive this very generous donation from the Central Pacific Bank Foundation,” said Robbie Alm, PBS Hawaii Board Chair. “CPB has had to overcome tremendous odds to even be here today and to be a reflection of their return to great health makes it even more special.”

 

For more information on PBS Hawaii’s NEW HOME, naming opportunities or to contribute toward the project’s completion, visit PBSHawaii.org.

 

Download this Press Release

 

Contact: Emily Bodfish
Email: ebodfish@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1169

 

PBS Hawaii is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawaii’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawaii and Hawaii to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

“…It’s a Vision of the Mind and Heart”

The second story of PBS Hawaii's NEW HOME is being built atop an existing building, with this new top floor over parking.

The second story of PBS Hawaii’s NEW HOME is being built atop an existing building, with this new top floor extending over parking.

 

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiFor the first time in my life, I enjoy having to stop in traffic for a red light – but only the one at Nimitz Highway and Sand Island Access Road.

 

Near this traffic intersection that’s home to a huge monkey pod tree, a two-story building continues to emerge, one in which more than a thousand Hawaii residents have invested.

 

PBS Hawaii’s new location, The Clarence T.C. Ching Campus, is a welcome bricks-and-mortar sight for our Board of Directors, Community Advisory Council, and Staff. More than that, it’s a vision of the mind and heart.

 

What we see is the promise of collaborative space that will allow us to create and deepen programmatic partnerships with other nonprofits, educators, filmmakers and other artists, businesses, labor and government. We see live televised events enlivening the industrial district with music and capturing meaningful debates on timely issues. We see teachers and students as frequent visitors – physically and virtually – as they take part in workshops in media literacy, journalism and video production. We see our suite of locally produced shows expanding as more media-makers are attracted to noncommercial PBS-style diverse viewpoints and trustworthy information.

 

I’m happy to report that construction, by Allied Builders System, is on budget and on time. We thank the Hawaii State Legislature for approving a $1 million grant this year for construction and First Hawaiian Bank Foundation for the largest corporate gift to date – $200,000.

 

What we see is the promise of collaborative space that will allow us to create and deepen programmatic partnerships…

 

We’re starting the home stretch, with $3.5 million to go to reach the $30 million goal. To all who have already made a gift of any size, thank you so much for sharing in this vision that is larger than all of us.

 

A hui hou (until next time),

Leslie signature

 

 

Island Insurance Foundation Donates $50,000 to PBS Hawaii for NEW HOME

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HONOLULU—The Island Insurance Foundation has donated $50,000 to PBS Hawaii for the renovation and construction of the public television station’s new facility.

 

Board chair Robert Alm and president and CEO Leslie Wilcox of PBS Hawaii receive the $50,000 check from the President of Island Insurance Foundation, Tyler Tokioka.

 

Board chair Robert Alm and president and CEO Leslie Wilcox of PBS Hawaii receive the $50,000 check from the president of Island Insurance Foundation, Tyler Tokioka.

 

Construction of PBS Hawaii’s The Clarence T.C. Ching Campus began in November 2014, with completion in spring 2016. The existing one-story structure at the corner of Nimitz Highway and Sand Island Access Road (formerly the KFVE Newsplex) is being renovated and expanded to include a second story, for a total of 30,000 square feet under roof.

 

The structure will house a main television studio, a “Learning Zone” for students and teachers, and spaces that promote collaboration and partnerships for innovation.

 

“Island Insurance is proud to support PBS Hawaii and its tradition of providing quality educational programming,” said Tyler Tokioka, President of the Island Insurance Foundation. “Their new facility will enable PBS Hawaii to enhance its content and showcase the stories that make Hawaii such a special place.”

 

“Island Insurance is a company known for its deep and abiding commitment to Hawaii and what is best about us,” said Robbie Alm, PBS Hawaii Board Chair. “To have them support us is very, very special.”

 

For more information on PBS Hawaii’s NEW HOME, naming opportunities or to contribute toward the project’s completion, visit PBSHawaii.org/newhome.

 

Download this Press Release

 

Contact: Emily Bodfish
Email: ebodfish@pbshawaii.org
Phone: 808.973.1169

 

PBS Hawaii is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Hawaii’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawaii and Hawaii to the world. PBSHawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii

 

PBS Hawaii receives $50,000 grant from Matson Foundation for NEW HOME

 

Matson check presentation to PBS Hawaii

 

HONOLULU, HI – PBS Hawaii has received a $50,000 grant from the Matson Foundation for the public television station’s NEW HOME at the entrance to Sand Island.

 

The grant brings the sum that PBS Hawaii has raised for its new facility up to $23.9 million. The fundraising goal is $30 million.

 

Construction of PBS Hawaii’s The Clarence T.C. Ching Campus began in November 2014, with completion in early 2016. The existing one-story structure at the corner of Nimitz Highway and Sand Island Access Road, formerly the KFVE Newsplex, is being renovated and expanded to include a second story, for a total of 30,000 square feet under roof.

 

The structure will house a main television studio, a “Learning Zone” for students and teachers, and spaces that promote collaboration and partnerships for innovation.

 

“Matson was pleased to learn that PBS Hawaii is locating its new home in the Kalihi neighborhood, not far from our operations and headquarters on Sand Island,” said Matt Cox, President and CEO of Matson and President of the Matson Foundation. “We are glad to join many of Hawaii’s locally based corporations that provided leadership gifts to this capital campaign, and we extend thanks to so many individuals and business donors for their generosity.”

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawaii President and CEO, said, “We so appreciate this leadership move by a great company, Matson, which is investing in its home community through PBS Hawaii.”

 

For more information on PBS Hawaii’s NEW HOME, naming opportunities or to contribute toward the project’s completion, visit PBSHawaii.org/newhome.

 

Download the PDF of this News Release

 

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