New Mexico

10 Homes that Changed America

 

Visit homes that transformed residential living, from grand estates like Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello and Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater to the pueblos of Taos, New Mexico, and the tenements of 19th-century New York.

 

 

MOVEABLE FEAST WITH FINE COOKING
Santa Fe, New Mexico

 

Settled at the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, Santa Fe, New Mexico is home to a culinary scene of mixed influences and Southwestern flavors and ingredients. In this episode of Moveable Feast with Fine Cooking, host Curtis Stone is joined by Chef Martin Rios, co-owner of award-winning restaurant, Restaurant Martin in Sante Fe, and Chef Leslie Chavez, who shares her strong background in catering and pastry in New Mexico. Together they visit The Rooted Leaf and Celestial Bee, a farm that produces exquisite bee honey and fresh, highly cared-for produce. They also visit a local chile farmer to see how Chimayo chile, a local heritage pepper, is dried and ground. At a colorful hacienda in Santa Fe, Chef Rios makes rosemary roasted turnips and Chef Chavez makes a sopapilla with the locally-sourced honey. Get to know the bright food scene of Santa Fe in this Southwestern feast!

 

 

MOVEABLE FEAST WITH FINE COOKING
Taos, New Mexico

 

Experience the rich history of the mountainous Taos region of New Mexico as Moveable Feast with Fine Cooking gets a taste of its incredible ingredients. Host Curtis Stone meets Christopher Lujan who grows ancient heirloom blue corn in the high-elevation mountains of the Taos Pueblo and learns about its significance to indigenous cultures. Curtis finds more fresh produce at Matt Romero Farms, where they grow everything from oats to heirloom varietal chiles. He brings all these ingredients together with the help of Chef Andrew Horton, who believes in simple dishes and rustic cooking, and Chef Chris Maher, who owns Cooking Studio Taos, where the feast is held. The chefs elevate New Mexican cuisine by preparing a meal of beautiful blue corn cakes followed by local lamb tacos and a green chile stew.

 

 

INDEPENDENT LENS
Seed: The Untold Story

 

Few things on Earth are as miraculous and vital as seeds, which have been worshipped and treasured since the dawn of humankind. This film follows passionate seed-keepers protecting our 12,000 year-old food legacy. In the last century, 94% of our seed varieties have disappeared. As biotech chemical companies control the majority of our seeds, farmers, scientists, lawyers, and indigenous seed keepers fight a battle to defend the future of our food. In a story both harrowing and heartening, these reluctant heroes rekindle a lost connection to our most treasured resource and revive a culture connected to seeds. Featuring Dr. Jane Goodall, Andrew Kimbrell, Winona Laduke, Raj Patel and Vandana Shiva.

 

Georgia O’Keeffe:
A Woman on Paper

 

Artist Georgia O’Keeffe has been called the “Mother of American Modernism,” well-known for her flowing, colorful works depicting flowers and plants, dramatic cityscapes and Southwestern landscapes. This documentary highlights the artist’s career while focusing on the little-known story of O’Keeffe’s time spent in Columbia, S.C. as an art instructor at Columbia College in 1915-16. O’Keeffe produced a series of black and white abstract charcoal drawings that represented a radical break with tradition and led her art – and her career – in a new direction.

 

GLOBE TREKKER
West Texas

 

Trekker Zay Harding starts his journey in Austin, where he experiences everything from rattlesnake hotdogs to bingo with chickens. He then heads south to San Antonio for a visit to the Alamo. Following a night in the most haunted hotel in Texas, Zay travels to the border city of El Paso. After meeting the locals, he treks into the surrounding desert to travel along the old Butterfield trail. Traveling in a 1960s Mustang, Zay embarks on a road trip along Route 66 where he takes in the stunning Palo Duro Canyon, competes in Amarillo’s steak-eating challenge and concludes his trip in Glenrio, the mysterious ghost town that borders New Mexico.

 

GENEALOGY ROADSHOW
Albuquerque

 

Follow a diverse cast of participants on an emotional journey that uses history and science to uncover their fascinating family stories. Each individual’s past is a link to a larger community history, revealing the rich cultural tapestry of America.

 

Albuquerque
Trace a woman’s connection to a Native American code talker; a man’s deep New Mexican roots; an ancestor whose life resembles a Wild West tale; queries about a tie to the explosive Trinity Test; and a man’s link to a famous comic book heroine.

 

THE STORY OF WOMEN AND ART
Parts 1 – 3

 

In this three-part series, Professor Amanda Vickery explores the story of female creativity through the ages with a fascinating art history tour from the Renaissance to the 20th century. Vickery shows how a familiarity with female artistry helps us to understand the ways societal attitudes toward women and their artistic endeavors have evolved throughout the years.

 

Part 1 of 3
Sat., April 9, 8:00 pm

 

Professor Vickery begins her journey in Florence, cradle of the Renaissance. This was a world where women’s private lives and creativity were well hidden behind closed doors. Vickery encounters intrepid art historians who, as they have discovered long-forgotten works in basements, storeroom and convents, also uncover the incredible stories of female artists who fulfilled their artistic ambitions, despite myriad social constraints placed upon them. Leaving the opulence and excess of Catholicism behind, Vickery heads north, discovering how the Protestant Reformation created a very different artistic landscape.

 

Part 2 of 3
Sat., April 9, 9:00 pm

 
Professor Vickery turns the spotlight on Britain – a new world leader in innovation, manufacturing and commerce, and France – home to the finest and most extravagant court of the 18th century. It’s a world defined by male artists like Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Gainsborough. Yet this was a world shaped, styled and designed by women. Much of the art produced by women had the status of “amateur” – a word that had yet to acquire the negative connotations it holds today.

 

Part 3 of 3
Sat., April 9, 10:00 pm

 

Professor Vickery explores the explosion of creative opportunities seized by women from the mid-19th to the mid-20th century. At a time when women were beginning to demand greater social and economic freedoms and boldly forge independent paths, female creativity would not only triumph in traditionally male-dominated artistic arenas but redefine the very notion of what art could be. One artist, in particular, forged the most unconventional of paths while using conventional mediums: Georgia O’Keefe. O’Keefe founded an artistic movement from her New Mexico retreat, proving that with courage and talent women could be recognized as world class artists.