PBS

Donor Privacy Policy

How PBS Hawaiʻi Protects Donor Information

 

PBS Hawaiʻi adopts appropriate data collection, storage and processing practices and security measures to help protect against unauthorized access, alteration, disclosure or destruction of your personal information, but PBS Hawaiʻi cannot guarantee that your information is 100% secure. Your credit card information is not stored by PBS Hawaiʻi.

 

Sharing Personal Information

 

PBS Hawaiʻi uses third party service providers to help it operate the Website or administer activities on PBS Hawaiʻi’s behalf, such as collecting donations online. These third party vendors may have access to User information but they are required to protect the confidentiality of the information and to use it only for the limited purpose for which it was provided.

 

In addition, PBS Hawaiʻi shares personal information about our Users with Public Broadcasting Service (“PBS”) (http://www.pbs.org/). PBS Hawaiʻi will also share personally identifiable information about Users when required to do so by law, or in the good faith belief that such action is necessary to comply with state and federal laws or to respond to a court order, subpoena, or search warrant. PBS Hawaiʻi will also share personally identifiable information if we believe it is necessary to protect the rights, property and safety of us or others.

 

PBS Hawaiʻi may also share personally identifiable information in connection with, or during negotiations of, any merger, sale of company assets, financing or acquisition of all or a portion of our business to another company. Moreover, PBS Hawaiʻi may share personally identifiable information about a User upon the User’s consent.

 

PBS Hawaiʻi may share generic aggregated demographic information not linked to any personally identifiable information regarding Users with third parties.

 

Contact Information

 

Donors may opt out of services by contacting email@pbshawaii.org, by calling 808.462.5000 or via www.pbshawaii.org donation pages.

 

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns about PBS Hawaiʻi’s Privacy Policy and PBS Hawaiʻi’s privacy and security practices, you can contact a us at:

 

Phone: 808-462-5000

E-mail Address: email@pbshawaii.org

 

Mailing Address:

PBS Hawaiʻi

315 Sand Island Access Road

Honolulu, HI  96819

 

 

 

The Mission of Reaching Far and Deep

 

CEO Message

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEOThe theme of human connection ran alongside the subject of digital media strategies at the PBS Annual Meeting last month in Nashville, Tennessee. Which felt just right. What we strive to do in public media is combine the power of touch and the reach of tech to serve our home states.

 

Why meet in Nashville? Because PBS representatives from around the country need to meet somewhere – and Music City was a great setting for renowned filmmaker Ken Burns to share his newest epic, Country Music.

 

He spoke in a hotel ballroom two blocks from a boulevard of windows-thrown-open, live-music honky tonks. The eight-part, 16-hour film premieres on PBS stations nationally on Sunday, September 15.

 

At the conference, Burns said the film isn’t only for country music fans. At the heart of this American art form are honesty, vulnerability and real life. It’s about the joy of love and family, the hurt of betrayal, loneliness, regret, resilience, toil, faith, independence and the lure of the open road.

 

The Mission of Reaching Far and Deep

Leslie at Nashville conference with national PBS figures (right to left)
news anchor Judy Woodruff, commentator David Brooks and
(far left) arts adviser Jane Chu

 

I had the privilege of taking part in a discussion on stage with heavy hitters: (right to left) PBS NewsHour anchor and managing editor Judy Woodruff; NY Times Op-Ed columnist/PBS NewsHour commentator/author David Brooks and (far left) PBS Arts Adviser Jane Chu. We looked at how the arts reach deep within people and we considered Brooks’ proposition that the neighborhood, not the individual, is the essential unit of social change. And we talked about using local knowledge to determine the best ways to convene and authentically engage communities of diverse voices.

 

Just as there’s no quick fix for the broken heart in a country song, there’s no manual for success in the rapidly changing media industry. The spinning evolution of tech choices, viewer options and fragmented audiences requires media makers to be agile and relentlessly purposeful – and that still doesn’t assure success.

 

Here’s an industry expectation that’s a safe bet: In three years or less there will be as many digital screens as live TV screens being used to view programming.

 

PBS KIDS viewing is already there. Digital screens dominate in front of young children, who also use them to play PBS educational video games.

 

Back from Nashville, our local team knows that we need more than quality programming going for PBS Hawaiʻi; we need to offer easy availability. You as a viewer want to be able to watch what you want – when and where you want it. Our Passport streaming service and our website on-demand programs are a start.

 

If PBS Hawaiʻi’s digital strategy goals were a country music song, the title would be “I’ll Go Anywhere With You.”

 

Aloha Nui,

Leslie signature


 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
At Halekulani’s House Without A Key

 

NĀ MELE goes on location to document a traditional, cherished Hawaiian experience. Halekulani has a special place in the hearts of Hawai‘i’s people and everyone who has spent time there. PBS Hawai‘i captures a late afternoon at the hotel’s House Without a Key with hula dancers Kanoe Miller and Debbie Nakanelua-Richards, and the musical trio Pa‘ahana (Pakala Fernandes, Kaipo Kukahiko and Douglas Po‘oloa Tolentino).

 

 

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
Waipuna

 

Kale Hannahs, David Kamakahi and Matt Sproat of the acclaimed Hawaiian music group Waipuna present their interpretation of Hawaiian music, accompanied by hula dancer Jaimie Kennedy. From “Malama Mau Hawai‘i,” a selection from Waipuna’s first album, to “E Mau Ke Aloha,” composed by David’s father, Dennis Kamakahi, Waipuna will take you through a joyful musical cycle.

 

 

NĀ MELE: TRADITIONS IN HAWAIIAN SONG
Melveen Leed

NA MELE: Melveen Leed

 

Singer Melveen Leed is joined by her hula dancer daughter Kaaikaula Naluai at the PBS Hawai‘i studios. Best known for contemporary Hawaiian, jazz and country, Moloka‘i girl Melveen also has deep roots in traditional Hawaiian song.

 

 

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Junk in the Trunk 4, Part 1 of 2

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW: Junk in the Trunk 4, Part 1

 

The Roadshow has more appraisals than ever to share from the eight cities it visited during its newly expanded Season 18 tour. The first hour of “Junk in the Trunk 4” is an all new episode with appraisals from this season, including a Steiff Pushmi-Pullyu Doctor Dolittle character, ca. 1967, acquired at auction in 1968; a Pablo Picasso linocut, ca. 1950, discovered in a basement; and a pair of Italian carved door panels, ca. 1550, purchased at an estate sale for $500 and now valued at $20,000 to $30,000.

 

Preview

 

 

 

NĀ MELE
Cyril Pahinui and Peter Moon Jr.

In Memoriam: Cyril Pahinui 1950-2018

 

 

This special NĀ MELE presentation features Cyril Pahinui and Peter Moon Jr., sons of Hawaiian music icons: slack key guitar legend Gabby “Pops” Pahinui and Peter Moon Sr., a seminal figure in the Hawaiian Renaissance of the 1970s.

NA MELE Cyril Pahinui and Peter Moon Jr.

 

 

 

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