Seabury Hall Middle School

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 920: Paula Keele, a wellness educator and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani profile Paula Keele, a wellness educator who teaches a class called enhanced fitness to senior citizens at Kahului Union Church. Ms. Keele started the program because her mother had become debilitated by foregoing the proper physical therapy after she broke her shoulder. “I really want to make sure that seniors stay healthy for as long as possible,” says Keele. Her students, however, seem to be teaching Keele as much as she is teaching them. “My students have taught me patience,” she says. “They’ve taught me kindness. They’ve set really great examples, almost like mentors, on how I can be better as I get older.”

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Seabury Hall Middle School in Upcountry Maui explore the plight of one of the longest surviving species on earth—the sea turtle.

 

–Students from Roosevelt High School in the Makiki district of O‘ahu profile a Japanese immigrant student at Roosevelt who had a hard time fitting in until other students began to respect him for who he is.

 

–Students from Waiākea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island introduce us to a dancer who uses dancing to alleviate the extreme pain she suffers from a rare physical disorder.

 

–Students from Dole Middle School in the Kalihi district of O‘ahu teach us the tinikling, a traditional Filipino dance that has participants jumping in and out between two moving bamboo poles.

 

–Students from Wheeler Middle School on O‘ahu tell the story of a young woman who climbs Mt. Kilimanjaro as a means of healing.

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a deaf cheerleader who refuses to be called disabled and feels she can achieve anything that a hearing person can.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Wallace Rider Farrington High School in the Kalihi district of O‘ahu.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 915: Girls Got Grit and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Sacred Hearts Academy, an all-girl school in the Kaimuki district of O‘ahu, tell the story of their school’s professional mentoring program called Girls Got Grit. The program places Sacred Hearts students in professional work places where they are mentored by female staffers. The story follows Sacred Hearts junior Shelby Mattos, who is interning at Hawaii News Now through Girls Got Grit. “Being in Girls Got Grit allows students to enter a professional business environment, and doing that kind of sets a level of expectations for when we enter the workforce,” says Mattos. Other Girls Got Grit internships include Castle Medical Center and Alexander & Baldwin. The program’s director Shelly Kramer says, “I want these girls to come out strong, empowered and feeling that they have a network that they can touch.”

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Hilo Intermediate School on Hawai‘i Island show us how to make a refreshing AND healthy snack: a yogurt parfait.

 

–Students from Mililani Middle School in Central O‘ahu feature Hawai‘i Women in Filmmaking, a nonprofit with a mission of addressing gender inequity in the film and media industry.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a young woman who designs and builds a wheelchair for her disabled dog.

 

–Students from Seabury Hall Middle School in upcountry Maui explore the integral role of mules at Haleakala National Park.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i feature a young woman in the traditionally male role of a Samoan fire knife dancer.

 

–Students from King Intermediate School in Windward O‘ahu tell the story of a female student who fell in love with DJ-ing.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at President William McKinley High School in Honolulu.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: ‘Ike pono

This episode is the fifth in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is ‘ike pono, which means to know what is right. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Maui Waena Intermediate School who feature Christopher Malik Cousins, owner of the Farmacy Health Bar in Wailuku, Maui. Cousins had been a troubled youth, often in trouble with the law and even living on the streets. Being fed at Saint Theresa’s Church in Kihei eventually inspired him to do the right thing and open his own health food restaurant. His motivation for opening the business was not to make money, but to provide his family and community with healthy snacks, to employ people who need a helping hand (like he did), and to encourage his customers to “pay-it-forward” by contributing to a program that helps to feed the hungry with healthy foods. “I went from someone who wasn’t doing Maui any good to someone who is making a difference,” says Cousins.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Waianae Intermediate School (Oahu): Sosefina Matautia, once a self-professed bully at Waianae Intermediate School, decided to do the right thing and change her ways. While becoming a kinder, better person benefitted those around her, Sosefina was motivated to change because of her own dreams of someday becoming a doctor.

 

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui): Led by math teacher Debi Davis, Seabury Hall Middle School students do the right thing for the less fortunate by weaving colorful yarn hats that are distributed around the world to help brighten the lives of underprivileged children.

 

Kealakehe High School (Hawaii Island): Students and other community members in Kona do the right thing by banding together to build Habitat for Humanity homes for families on the Hawaiian Homes wait list.

 

Waianae High School (Oahu): Sometimes doing what you know is right requires great sacrifice. Sometimes doing what is right means doing less for yourself. Such is the case with Waianae High School student Daisy Agae, whose grades suffer because she has to take care of her two younger brothers, one of whom is a special needs child born with debilitating medical conditions.

 

Hawaii Preparatory Academy (Hawaii Island): Hawaii Island resident William ”Black” Abraham was headed down the wrong path as a young adult, until he decided to do the right thing and dedicate his life to saving lives. He did so by becoming an Ocean Safety Officer at Hapuna Beach and is now inspiring the next generation of lifesavers through his Junior Lifeguard training program.

 

Kamehameha Schools Maui High (Maui): An East Maui couple do the right thing by taking in and caring for animals with debilitating and life-threatening illnesses. As a result, their home has become the East Maui Animal Refuge, more affectionately known as the Boo-Boo Zoo. This episode is hosted by Waiakea Intermediate School in Hilo, Hawaii.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 3 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 4 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Focus on Compassion: Animals

 

The final installment of the four-part Focus on Compassion HIKI NŌ series focuses on peoples’ compassion toward animals, including house pets, working pets, exotic animals and endangered species. Like the previous three shows, this episode is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ and Wai‘anae High School graduate who is currently attending Menlo College in Atherton, California.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this Focus on Compassion show include:

 

–“Dog Adoption” from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i: a look at a creative program initiated by the Kaua‘i Humane Society to promote dog adoptions through visitors taking the animals on nearby field trips.

 

–“Towards No More Homeless Pets” from Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui: a feature on the spay/neuter clinic conducted by the Maui Humane Society to compassionately address and prevent the overpopulation of homeless cats on the island.

 

–“Three Ring Ranch” from Kealakehe High School on the island of Hawai‘i: the story of how one woman’s life work to protect and educate about exotic animals was inspired by the animals who helped her recover from a debilitating accident.

 

–“Passion for Service” from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui: the story of a young woman who spent almost half her life volunteering at Assistance Dogs of Hawaii, a program that trains dogs to assist people with special needs.

 

–“Wounded Warriors” from Waialua High and Intermediate School on O‘ahu: a feature on the work of Hawaii Fi-do, an organization that trains service companion dogs, and the positive impact one of their companion dogs had on a Schofield soldier in the Wounded Warrior Project.

 

–“Nene” from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i: a look at the multi- state agency project of removing a flock of nene, Hawai‘i’s state bird, nesting on Kaua‘i Lagoon between the two runways at Līhu‘e Airport to a safer location for the birds and the public.

 

–“Mālama NOAA” from Āliamanu Middle School on O‘ahu: a feature on the efforts of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to protect and preserve the endangered Hawaiian monk seal population through medical care of sick or injured seals, the enforcement of laws, and through community education.

 

–“Hokulani” from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu: the story of a Pomeranian that spreads joy wherever it goes.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 30, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Oct. 1, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #814 – Best Overall Story, Middle School Division

 

The sixth in a series of seven 2017 HIKI NŌ Award nominee shows highlights the nominees for Best Overall Story, Middle School Division:

 

–“Dog Wheelchair” by Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i;

 

–“Firefighter” by Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i;

 

–“Steel Guitar” by Ka Waihona o Ka Na‘auao Public Charter School on O‘ahu;

 

–“Haleakala Mules” by Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui;

 

–“A Home for Larenzo” by Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu.

 

This episode is hosted by Noah Faumuina from Castle High School (O‘ahu) and Kukui Raymond from Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu).

 

This program encores Saturday, March 4 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, March 5 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



2017 HIKI NŌ AWARDS RESULTS

HIKI NŌ Awards Nominees March 23, 2017

 

The 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards

PBS Hawai‘i recognizes exceptional storytelling skills of middle and high school students throughout our Islands who participate in HIKI NŌ, our statewide digital learning initiative and student news program.

 

The nominees were chosen from HIKI NŌ shows that aired during the 2015-2016 school year and the Fall Semester of this current school year. You can view each nominated piece by clicking on its name in the list below. (You can also watch the nominated projects, by category, Thursdays at 7:30 pm, Saturdays at noon, and Sundays at 3:00 pm on PBS Hawai’i.)

 

This year’s Gold, Silver and Bronze winners are indicated below. Winning stories, as well as highlights from this year’s awards celebrations, will be featured on our two-part 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards Show, Thursday, March 23 and Thursday, March 30 at 7:30 pm on PBS Hawai‘i. Congratulations to all nominees and winners – and mahalo to all the students, teachers and mentors who help make HIKI NŌ a success in our public, private and charter schools throughout Hawai‘i.

 


 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Aliamanu Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Homeschooled Student” SILVER

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Moses Hamilton” GOLD

Hongwanji Mission School (O‘ahu) – “Laurie Rubin” BRONZE

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Joe Young”

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui) – “John Plunkett”

 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

H.P. Baldwin High School (Maui) – “Bipolar Artist”

James Campbell High School (O‘ahu) – “Miracle Baby” GOLD

Maui High School (Maui) – “Marc Unites”

Mid-Pacific (O‘ahu) – “Ukulele Hale” BRONZE

Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu) – “Living With Pain” SILVER

 

BEST WRITING — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Aliamanu Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Front Office”

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “K-9 Search & Rescue” GOLD

Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle (Maui) – “Feed My Sheep”

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Love Laundry” BRONZE

Lahaina Intermediate School (Maui) – “Airconditioning”

Mililani Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Mokauea Island” SILVER

 

BEST WRITING — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

Kapolei High School (O‘ahu) – “Best Buddies Basketball”

Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i) – “Biomass” GOLD

Kua O Ka La Miloli‘i Hipu‘u Virtual Academy PCS (Hawai‘i Island) – “Opelu Fishing” BRONZE

Sacred Hearts Academy (O‘ahu) – “Text Neck” SILVER

Saint Francis School (O‘ahu) – “Lucy’s Lab Creamery”

Waiakea High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “Cosplay”

 

BEST OVERALL STORY — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Dog Wheelchair”

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Firefighter”

Ka Waihona o Ka Naʻauao PCS (O‘ahu) – “Steel Guitar” BRONZE

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui) – “Haleakala Mules” SILVER

Wai‘anae Intermediate School (O‘ahu)– “A Home For Larenzo” GOLD

 

BEST OVERALL STORY — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

H.P. Baldwin High School (Maui) – “Life After Sugar”

Kapa‘a High School (Kaua‘i) – “Iloreta Brothers” GOLD

Konawaena High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “A Love Story”

Maui High School (Maui) – “Deaf Cheerleader” BRONZE

Waiʻanae High School (O‘ahu) – “Without Home” SILVER

 

BEST FRANCHISE PIECE

Hana K-12 (Maui) – “Ti Leaf Print”

Kalani High School (O‘ahu) – “Thaumatrope”

Kapa‘a Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “10 Things To Do When You’re NOT On Your Smartphone” GOLD

Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i) – “Hurricane Protection” BRONZE

Moloka‘i High School (Moloka‘i) “Text-A-Tip

Pacific Buddhist Academy (O‘ahu) – “Offering Incense” SILVER

 

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN CINEMATOGRAPHY & EDITING

Kapa‘a Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Junior Lifeguard”

Maui High School (Maui) – “Tourette” GOLD

Moanalua High School (O‘ahu) – “Equestrian” SILVER

Sacred Hearts Academy (O‘ahu) – “IUCN”

Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu) – “Parental Guidance Required” BRONZE

 

BEST FACTOID

Hana K-12  (Maui) – “School History”

Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy (Hawai‘i Island) – “Solar Trees” GOLD

Konawaena High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “Wildcats”

Mililani High School (O‘ahu) – “Red Dirt” BRONZE

President William McKinley High School (O‘ahu) – “School Spirit” SILVER

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #802

 

TOP STORY
Students from Hawai‘i Preparatory Academy in Waimea on Hawai‘i Island tell the amazing story of their school’s “Come Fly With Me” program that teaches middle school students how to pilot actual helicopters. The program takes students from classroom instruction (where they learn about the different parts of a helicopter and what they do) to actual flight-time. From the experience, students learn the value of remaining calm under pressure and how to think on their feet. The program is also used to get students to think about aviation as a possible career path.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
–A student from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu tells the very personal story of how her father, who lost his leg in a motorcycle accident, copes with intense pain every day.

 

–Students from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui feature a local teacher/writer who brings Hawai‘i’s plantation days back to life on the printed page.

 

–Students at Hawaii Technology Academy on O‘ahu demonstrate how to tie a bow-tie and, as a result, add some flair to one’s wardrobe.

 

–Students at Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha Public Charter School on Kaua‘i tell us of their school’s special relationship with Saint Thomas University in Minnesota. And students from Hawaii Mission Academy on O‘ahu introduce us to the grandson of one of the most beloved Hawaiian cultural icons of all time: Mary Kawena Pukui.

 

This program encores Saturday, Nov. 26 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Nov. 27 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #720

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ highlights some of the best stories from the spring quarter of the 2015-16 school year. The show is hosted by Waianae High School Class of 2016 graduate and HIKI NŌ standout Crystal Cebedo, who will be attending Menlo College in Atherton, California on a full scholarship. Besides introducing seven outstanding stories, Crystal takes us on her HIKI NŌ journey – from her Waianae Intermediate School story about dealing with her mother’s terminal cancer, to learning leadership skills on her Waianae High School HIKI NŌ productions.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this compilation show include:

 

“Opelu Fishing” from Kua o ka La Milolii Hipuu Virtual Academy on Hawaii Island: a look at traditional and sustainable Hawaiian opelu fishing in the remote South Kona fishing village of Milolii.

 

“K-9 Search and Rescue” from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauai: a feature on how Kauai’s canine search and rescue team takes the bond between man and man’s best friend to new heights.

 

“Hawaiian Steel Guitar” from Ka Waihona o ka Naauao Public Charter School in Nanakuli, Oahu: a history of the invention and promotion of the Hawaiian Steel Guitar by Joseph Kekuku of Laie, Oahu.

 

“Without Home” from Waianae High School in West Oahu: a look at a self-managed, self-governed homeless encampment in Waianae and how its residents have developed a broader, more universal definition of home.

 

“Haleakala Mules” from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui: a nuts and bolts look at how a mule team gets important environmental work done deep in Haleakala National Park.

 

“Laurie Rubin” from Hongwanji Mission School on Oahu: the story of accomplished singer, teacher and theatrical producer/director Laurie Rubin, who dispels many of the myths about how blind people (of which she is one) navigate through life.

 

“Life After Sugar” from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui: Conversations with two employees of Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co. – the last sugar mill in Hawaii – whose upcoming closing will mark the end of the Hawaii’s sugar industry. The two employees, whose families have worked at HC&S for generations, reminisce about the past and speculate on their future.

 

This episode congratulates all 2016 High School graduates who participated in HIKI NŌ and recognizes each of them in the credits.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 24 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 25 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NO
Focus on Local Business

 

This episode, hosted by HIKI NŌ graduate Shisa Kahaunaele, looks back at past stories about Hawaii-based, locally-run businesses:

 

–A story from Maui High School about a grocer in Happy Valley, Maui who has figured out how to use the influx of big-box retailers to his advantage.

 

–A profile from Waimea High School on Kauai about a successful t-shirt artist who grew up in Waimea so poor that all he could afford to wear were t-shirts.

 

— A history by Seabury Hall Middle School about the iconic, family-run Komoda Bakery in Makawao.

 

— A story from Roosevelt High School on Oahu about a café that sells slow-drip coffee but whose real draw is the unrushed, face-to-face interaction between its customers.

 

— A study from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle of Maui Soda & Ice Works and the strong set of family values that has made that business a success.

 

— A story from Kalaheo High School on Oahu about a chocolate manufacturer in Kailua whose product bears the name of a valley in Honolulu (Manoa Chocolates) and that uses cacao beans from all over the world.

 

— A profile from Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island about a family-founded -and-run hotel that is nearing a hundred years of age and whose success can be attributed to the allure of nostalgia and a great pork chop.

 

This program encores Saturday, July 16 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, July 17 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Without Home

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Waianae High School in West Oahu present their story, “Without Home”, about the Hale Aole homeless encampment near the boat harbor in Waianae. What makes Hale Aole different from other homeless encampments on Oahu is that the residents have established a set of rules for their community and take it upon themselves to enforce those rules. Although the residents of Hale Aole are technically homeless, many consider the encampment their home because it provides them with a safe haven. As one of the residents says: “How do know if it’s home? If it’s your sanctuary.”

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Sacred Hearts Academy on Oahu tell the story of a young volunteer at the Honolulu Zoo who is following in the footsteps of her zoo employee parents.

 

Students from Kalani High School on Oahu show us the latest in 3-D printing with a computer-controlled laser-cutter.

 

Continuing the theme of high-tech innovations, we visit the HIKI NŌ archives for a look back at an Ewa Makai Middle School (Oahu) story on their high-tech physical education program.

 

Students at Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui show us the history and present-day use of mules in Haleakala National Park.

 

Students at Moanalua High School on Oahu tell of the obstacles that faced a high school volleyball player when he transferred from Saint Louis School to Moanalua High School.

 

This program encores Saturday, May 28 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, May 29 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 

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