South Korea

SAMANTHA BROWN’S PLACES TO LOVE
Food Around the World

SAMANTHA BROWN’S PLACES TO LOVE: Food Around The World

 

While visiting the Swiss city of Interlaken, Samantha learns the art of chocolate making in a “funky” way. In Orange County, California Samantha learns about the Vietnamese community in the city of Westminster while making spring rolls. On a road trip through Texas Hill Country she stops in and tries her hand at making duck schnitzel in keeping with the historical roots of the region. In New Zealand, Samantha engages with the local Maori community in the city of Whakatane and learns how the traditional feast “Hangi” is made. What’s food, without a drink? In Montreal, Samantha learns about how gin is made from local ingredients and then has a classic cocktail. On a fascinating trip to Seoul, South Korea Samantha learns how to make bulgogi, the classic Korean beef dish. Finally, in Santa Fe she learns how to make an enchilada “Christmas” style.

 

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SAMANTHA BROWN’S PLACES TO LOVE
Seoul, South Korea

SAMANTHA BROWN’S PLACES TO LOVE: Seoul, South Korea

 

Samantha begins her journey on a tour in Yeonnam-Dong, a re-purposed green space filled with a resurgence of diverse restaurants and coffee shops; visits the Korean Stone Art Museum and strolls through the Yeouido Cherry Blossom Festival.

 

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JOSEPH ROSENDO’S TRAVELSCOPE
South Korea – A Winter Journey

 

For his second trip to South Korea, Joseph visits in winter and discovers that besides the many attractions of the capital city of Seoul, more treasures await in the countryside, including World Heritage temples and historic villages.

 

 

Korea:
The Forgotten War in Colour

 

This two-part program, presented back-to-back, offers a unique insight into a conflict that saw East confront West, communism challenge liberal democracy and Korean fight Korean in a bloody civil war. It features first-hand accounts and recently discovered original color film to shed light on this historical event.

 

Outbreak
In the summer of 1950, the people of Korea were trapped between two new superpowers of the postwar world flexing their muscles – the United States and the Soviet Union. On June 25, 1950, the North Korean People’s Army invaded the South. For the next 12 months, the opposing forces of North and South marched up and down the Korean peninsula in a series of attacks and counterattacks until cease-fire negotiations began on July 10, 1951. But the negotiations did not bring an end to the conflict, and the war dragged on for another two years.

 

Stalemate
While diplomats wrangled and negotiators argued, the fighting in the blighted Korean countryside continued. Stories emerged of atrocities committed by both sides. Amid allegations of retribution and reprisals, one of the major issues at the negotiations was the repatriation of prisoners of war. Eventually, a ceasefire was declared on July 27, 1953.