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Who You Gonna Call?

 

CEO Message

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO

It‘s time for a new three-year strategic plan for this 55-year-old nonprofit organization serving our beloved, troubled state. How does one know, in changing, uncertain times, what Hawai‘i will need most from PBS Hawai‘i? How can we best serve our viewers and fellow citizens?

 

We take very seriously the feedback we receive from our Community Advisory Board Members, who live in communities across the state and who pay attention – to their island turf and to PBS Hawai‘i’s programming.

 

In a moving discussion, full of humanity, the Board told staffers that 1) We need to keep convening diverse voices in a neutral space, because common ground and solutions are getting harder to find; 2) We need to illuminate learning about the Hawaiian culture; 3) HIKI NŌ should expand its range to provide life, school and work skills to students in grade school through college; 4) We need to keep serving young children with curriculum-rich programming, since more than half do not attend preschool.

 

PBS Hawai‘i Community Advisory Board!

 
2020 Community Advisory Board photo
 

Top row (L-R): Kaʻimi Kaupiko, Miloliʻi, Hawaiʻi Island, cultural specialist and teacher; Lei Kihoi, Kailua-Kona, Hawaiʻi Island, attorney and community activist;
Chuck Boller, Windward Oʻahu,
international film consultant;
Chair Karen Knudsen, East Honolulu,
East-West Center executive;
Kainoa Horcajo, Wailuku, Maui,
Grand Wailea Hotel cultural advisor;
Shawn Malia Kanaʻiaupuni, PhD,
Windward Oʻahu, Kamehameha Schools executive strategy consultant;
Dennis Bunda, Central Oʻahu,
Aloha Spirit Foundation executive director
Bottom row (L-R): Les Murashige,
Central Oʻahu and Līhuʻe, Kauaʻi,
retired Island Air chief executive officer; Momi Akana, Kalihi Valley, Honolulu, Keiki O KaʻĀina Family Learning Centers leader; Marissa Sandblom, Līhuʻe, Kaua‘i, Common Ground Kauaʻi chief
operations officer


Not pictured: Cheryl Kaʻuhane Lupenui, North Hawaiʻi Island, The Kohala Center president and chief executive officer

 

Family services leader Momi Akana wanted us to know that it’s not only a lack of affordability or geographical distance that keeps keiki from preschool. She said that parents who have been sexually or otherwise physically abused as children are very wary of leaving their little ones with adults they don’t know. That’s why many of these parents choose PBS KIDS to help educate their toddlers at home, Momi said. There was concerned silence as we all pondered this.

 

It’s a Board that keeps things simple and straightforward – and deep. Main thing, said advisors: “Keep Hawai‘i’s trust. It’s tough to earn, easy to lose.”

 

Aloha nui,

Leslie signature

 


PBS Hawai‘i honors the life of longtime volunteer, Matsuko Kawana. Matsuko, or as we affectionately called her, “Grandma,” passed away peacefully in February at age 101. We will remember and miss her sweet smile, her stories of growing up on O‘ahu and Maui and her hardworking and humble nature. Rest in aloha, Matsuko.

A Life Well Lived

PBS Hawaiʻi honors the life of longtime volunteer, Matsuko Kawana. Matsuko, or as we affectionately called her, “Grandma,” passed away peacefully in February at age 101. We will remember and miss her sweet smile, her stories of growing up on O‘ahu and Maui and her hardworking and humble nature. Rest in aloha, Matsuko.


 

 

NOVA
The Planets: Inner Worlds

 

The rocky planets – Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars – were born of similar material around the same time, yet only one supports life. Were Earth’s neighbors always so extreme? Is there somewhere else in the solar system where life might flourish?

 

 

 

8 Days:
To the Moon and Back

 

Join Apollo 11 on its historic journey. The film seamlessly blends mission audio featuring conversations among Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins with new footage, NASA archive and stunning CGI to recreate the first moon landing.

 

 

 

LIFE FROM ABOVE
Patterned Planet

 

Discover the weird and wonderful shapes that cover Earth’s surface as seen from space. The Australian outback is covered in pale spots thanks to digging wombats, and hundreds of elephants tear into the endless green of the Congo forest canopy.

 

 

 

LIFE FROM ABOVE
Colorful Planet

 

From space earth is not just a blue planet but a kaleidoscope of color. Swirls of turquoise phytoplankton trigger an oceanic feeding frenzy, China turns yellow as millions of flowers bloom and at night the waters off the coast of Argentina are spotted with mysterious green lights.

 

 

 

LIFE FROM ABOVE
Moving Planet

 

See new footage of the greatest, most beautiful and powerful movements on our planet. Cameras in space capture events like an elephant family’s struggle through drought, and thousands of Shaolin Kung-Fu students performing in perfect synchronicity.

 

 

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Chasing the Moon

Celebrating the 50th anniversary of
the moon landing

By Jody Shiroma , PBS Hawaiʻi

 

Apollo 11 Saturn V launch vehicle lifts off from Kennedy Space Center.July 20, 1969 was a momentous day, a day whose events some would refer to later as the “greatest experience of their lifetime.” Parents around the world invited their children to join them around the television, “Come and watch this,” they said.

 

Families gathered around their television sets in awe, listening intently as messages came crackling over the airwaves. From Apollo 11, two American astronauts, Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, accomplished what no other humans had done – they stepped foot on the moon. Armstrong’s words, “That’s one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind,” echoed around the world.

 

(Image at right) Apollo 11 Saturn V launch vehicle lifts off from Kennedy Space Center.

 

As Americans and the world shared their experiences, for those living in Hawai‘i the event continued as astronauts Armstrong, Aldrin and Michael Collins made their first landfall on O‘ahu after their capsule splashed down in the Pacific Ocean. Their quarantine unit arrived at Pearl Harbor aboard the recovery vessel, the aircraft carrier USS Hornet, on their way back to Houston.

 

In recognition of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, AMERICAN EXPERIENCE and PBS Hawai‘i are premiering Chasing the Moon, a three-part, six-hour documentary series that brings the awe, excitement and unforgettable experience to life for both those who lived through it and for the generations who have come after.

 

Apollo 11 astronauts (from left): Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. share a laughFrom the space race’s earliest beginnings to the monumental achievement of the first lunar landing in 1969 and beyond, this series recasts this period as a fascinating time of scientific innovation, political calculation, media spectacle, visionary impulses and personal drama. Utilizing previously overlooked and lost archival material – much of which has never before been seen by the public – the film features a diverse cast of characters who played key roles in these historic events.

 

Among those are astronauts Aldrin, Frank Borman and Bill Anders; Sergei Khrushchev, son of the former Soviet premier and a leading Soviet rocket engineer; Poppy Northcutt, a 25-year old “mathematics whiz” who gained worldwide attention as the first woman to serve in the all-male bastion of NASA’s Mission Control; and Ed Dwight, the Air Force pilot selected by the Kennedy administration to train as America’s first black astronaut.

 

(Left) The Apollo 11 crewmen, still under a 21-day quarantine, are greeted by their wives. (Center) Poppy Northcutt became the first woman in an operational support role to work in NASA’s Mission Control Center in Houston with the flight of Apollo 8. (Right) Ed Dwight, the first African American to be trained as an astronaut

 

“When we think of that breathtaking moment of the 1969 moon landing, we forget what a turbulent time that was,” said Mark Samels, AMERICAN EXPERIENCE executive producer. “The country was dealing with huge problems – Vietnam, poverty, race riots – and there was a lot of skepticism about the space program. Chasing the Moon explores the unbelievably complex challenges that NASA was able to overcome. It was a century-defining achievement, and our film tells a familiar story in an entirely new way.”

 

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE

CHASING THE MOON

Monday – Wednesday at 9:00 pm
July 8 – 10
on PBS Hawaiʻi

Watch Preview

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: Chasing the Moon - cover story

 

 

 

To Catch a Comet

 

On November 11, billions of kilometers from Earth, a spacecraft orbiter and lander will do what no other has dared to attempt: land on the volatile surface of a comet as it zooms around the sun at 67, 000 km/hr. If successful, it could help peer into our past and unlock secrets of our origins.

 

 

 

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