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ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Santa Clara, CA Part 1 of 3

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is in Santa Clara, where host Mark L. Walberg and appraiser Stephen Fletcher travel to the Japanese American Museum of San Jose to learn about arts and crafts made by Japanese and Japanese Americans interned in camps during World War II.

 

 

NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT

NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT

Anchors Tyler Mathisen and Sue Herera

 

Every weeknight, the Emmy winning NIGHTLY BUSINESS REPORT delivers the day’s essential business and economic news. Each lively half-hour combines trusted, credible and unbiased information and extensive financial market coverage with insightful features, analysis and commentaries by noted economists and business experts.

 

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
Bismarck, ND, Part 3 of 3

 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW plants itself in Bismarck, North Dakota, and host Mark L. Walberg and appraiser Ken Farmer visit a farm where the main crop is farm-related collectibles. A letter written by George Washington and two Irish dragoon swallowtail guidon flags are appraised.

 

 

KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall
The Future of Work

KĀKOU – Hawai‘i's Town Hall: The Future of Work

 

Will you be employable? Will your children?

Conversations about the future and the kind of world our children and their children will inherit from us include familiar concerns and well-defined subjects: The National Debt. Environmental Destruction. Climate Change. Sustainability. But there’s another conversation that needs to happen. Although the workplace has changed throughout the decades, none of us can fully grasp the kind of transformational change that lies ahead. How we work. Where we work. And the skills we need for work will change work – as we know it today – forever.

 

The FUTURE OF WORK is the topic for the next live KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall – Thursday, October 25 from 8:00 – 10:00 pm. Representatives from government, labor and the education and business communities will be joined by workers, parents and students for a community conversation about what is referred to as the Fourth Industrial Revolution and the impact it is creating on local economies and employment landscapes – including Hawai‘i’s. Are we preparing our children for a future where disruptive technology will transform the workplace and much of the way we live?

 

What will life in Hawai‘i be like 10, 20 and 30 years from now when technology is firmly embedded and in most cases dominating the workplace? Could this be a positive opportunity to diversify Hawai‘i’s economy and job landscape? How do we prepare future generations for WORK 4.0?

 

 

 


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