Waiakea High School

HIKI NŌ 6|11|20:
Student Reflections Compilation Show

 

During April and May of 2020, twenty-five HIKI NŌ students from across the state created video reflections on how COVID-19 had changed their lives as they sheltered-in-place in their homes, giving Hawaiʻi’s youth a prominent voice during the pandemic. This Student Reflections compilation show presents all twenty-five reflections, offering a rare glimpse into the lives of local teens and pre-teens in these challenging times.

 

Students from the following schools were the correspondents in these reflections: Maui High School, Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi, Sacred Hearts Academy on Oʻahu, H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui, Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island, Maui Waena Intermediate School, Kauaʻi High School, Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School, Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi, Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island, ʻEwa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu, Waimea High School on Kauaʻi, Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy on Hawaiʻi Island, Farrington High School on Oʻahu, Roosevelt High School on Oʻahu, Wai‘anae High School in West Oʻahu, Moanalua High School on Oʻahu, Kealakehe Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island, Ᾱliamanu Middle School on Oʻahu, Waiākea Elementary School on Hawaiʻi Island, Hāna School on Maui, Kalāheo High School in Windward Oʻahu, Wai‘anae High School in West Oʻahu, ‘Īao School on Maui and Trinity Christian School in Windward Oʻahu.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 5|7|20:
Student Reflections on COVID-19, Part One

 

HIKI NŌ Student Reflections on COVID-19, Part One

 

HIKI NŌ students from across the island chain present their reflections on how COVID-19 has changed their lives as they shelter-in-place from their homes. Topics touched upon in their reflections include: the angst felt by seniors missing out on traditional graduation ceremonies; concern for the health of grandparents; staying in touch with friends electronically; learning new skills while isolated at home; missing out on one’s big moment at Merrie Monarch; distance learning from home; working parents and the safety precautions they take upon arriving at home at the end of their workday.

 

The student correspondents who share their reflections in this episode include: Christine Alonzo, a senior at Maui High School in Kahului; Aaliyah Nero, an 8th grader at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi; Leiolani Faurot, a senior at Sacred Hearts Academy on Oʻahu; Skylar Masuda, a senior at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui; Taylor McCann, a sophomore at Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island; Sienna Jolie Racoma, an 8th grader at Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului; and Ty Kajihara, a freshman at Kauaʻi High School.

 

ALSO FEATURED

Some of the top stories from the Winter Quarter of the 2019/2020 school year: “Kitten Yoga” from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island; “4 Sisters Forever” from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu; “Working Mom” from Farrington High School on Oʻahu; “Young Cartographer” from Hongwanji Mission School on Oʻahu; “Heart of Gold” from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu; and “Misfit Kempo Instructor” by Ewa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 2|6|20: Mele Murals and Other Stories | Program

 

TOP STORY

 

“Mele Murals”
Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy in the Waimea district of Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of volunteers from an arts organization known as Mele Murals who taught Waimea area students how to use meditation to guide them through the painting of a mural at the Waimea Community Center.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Kitten Yoga”
Students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of an inventive program launched at the Hawaiʻi Island Humane Society—Kitten Yoga. Kittens for whom the Human Society is trying to find forever homes are allowed to roam around during a yoga class attended by potential cat owners. The play and bonding that goes on between the kittens and the yoga practitioners often lead to adoption.

 

“Goteborg Musubi”
Students from Kapaʻa Middle School on the Garden Island show us how to make a type of musubi (rice ball) unique to Kauaʻi—the Goteborg Musubi, made with a smoked sausage that was introduced to the island by a German stonewall builder during the plantation era.

 

“Malorie Arisumi”
Students from ʻIao School on Maui tell the story of a Maui-based artist who had started a family during her senior year in high school and, consequently, had to delay her college-level art training to a later period in her life.

 

“Working Mom”
Students from Farrington High School in the Kalihi district of O’ahu tell the story of an immigrant from the Philippines who works three jobs in order to make ends meet, much to the chagrin of her teenaged son, who feels his mother is not able to spend enough time with him.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ also features profiles on the unique sports programs offered at some of the schools in the show.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 1|23|20: The Student’s Take | Program

 

This special edition features HIKI NŌ students Kallen Wachi (Waimea High School, Kauaʻi) and Kaycee Nakashima (Hawaii Baptist Academy, Oʻahu) convening in PBS Hawaiʻi’s HIKI NŌ editing suite to share their insights, feelings and revelations about some of the top stories from the Fall Semester of the 2019-2020 school year. (Kallen and Kaycee began their HIKI NŌ careers together at Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi.) The stories Kallen and Kaycee give their take on include:

 

“Suburbia”
A student at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui shares her inner-most thoughts about becoming a filmmaker in a personal video essay.

 

“Martin Charlot”
Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island follow veteran painter Martin Charlot (son of legendary artist Jean Charlot) as he restores a mural he created 46 years ago for what is now called the Ellison Onizuka Gymnasium at Konawaena High School.

 

“Shy Girl”
Students from Hilo High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a severely shy female Hilo High student who came out of her shell after she found her niche in her school’s media club.

 

“Chazz’s World”
Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tell the story of Chazz – a high school student who works at a pizza parlor to help his family pay the bills. The story explores the stress and other emotional hardships the situation causes for Chazz.

 

“A Second Chance”
Students from Waiākea High School in the Hilo district of Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of Easten Tanimoto, a young man who, under the influence of psilocybin (hallucinogenic mushrooms), climbed a telephone pole, was electrocuted, then fell to the ground, sustaining serious injuries and severe burns. After a miraculous recovery, Tanimoto has dedicated his life to speaking at schools and inspiring students to make better life choices.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 11|7|19:
A Second Chance and other stories

 

TOP STORY

“A Second Chance”
Students from Waiākea High School in the Hilo district of Hawaiʻi
Island tell the story of Easten Tanimoto, a young man who, under the influence of psilocybin (hallucinogenic mushrooms), climbed a telephone pole, was electrocuted, then fell to the ground, sustaining serious injuries and severe burns. After a miraculous recovery, Tanimoto has dedicated his life to speaking at schools and inspiring students to make better life choices.

 

ALSO FEATURED

“Veterans Mural”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a mural artist who forges a special connection with the war veterans from his community.

 

“Baseball Dad”
Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on the Garden Isle tell the story of a Kauaʻi man who raised two sons that became major league baseball players.

 

“Plastic Pollution”
Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului tell the story of Maui volunteers who are working to reduce plastic pollution in our oceans and on our beaches.

 

“Recycled Plastic Hale”
Students from Island School on Kauaʻi tell the story of the first building in the state to be built with blocks made of plastic waste.

 

“How to Make a Parol”
Students from Kalākaua Middle School on Oʻahu show us how to make a traditional Filipino Christmas decoration.

 

“Kapa Maker”
Students at Kalama Intermediate School on Maui introduce us to a master practitioner of a traditional Hawaiian form of textile-making.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Molokaʻi High School.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2019, Part Three

 

This is the third of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2019 (and one student from the Class of 2020) gathered at PBS Hawaiʻi to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

This episode features Carl Antiado, who graduated from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui and is now a Computer Science and Engineering major at the University of Nevada Reno; Kobie Uyeda, who graduated from Waiākea High School in Hilo and is now a Kinesiology Pre-Med major at Oregon State University; and Brandon Marcos, who graduated from Kauaʻi High School on Kauaʻi and is now majoring in Computer Science at UH Mānoa

 

Each graduate also shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Carl shows his story about a band teacher he had who inspired Carl and turned him onto a new perspective on life. Kobie shares her story “Stay Humble, Pray,” about an ex-convict/drug addict who speaks to students about how to avoid bad life choices. Brandon presents his story “Kapaʻa Gridlock,” an investigation into why traffic is so heavy on Kauaʻi.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
HIKI NŌ Class of 2019, Part One

 

This is the first of four specials in which outstanding HIKI NŌ graduates from the Class of 2019 (and one student from the Class of 2020) gathered at PBS Hawaiʻi to discuss their HIKI NŌ experiences and how they feel the skills they learned from HIKI NŌ will help them in college, the workplace and life.

 

Part One features Emily Tsuji, who graduated from Waiākea High School in Hilo and is now a freshman at Cal State Long Beach; Rebecca Meyer, who graduated from Sacred Hearts Academy on Oʻahu and is now majoring in Communications at Creighton University in Nebraska; and Selwyn Madarang, who graduated from Farrington High School on Oʻahu and is now majoring in Digital Media Video for Web at Leeward Community College.

 

Each graduate shows a HIKI NŌ story that they worked on and discusses what they learned from the experience of working on that particular story. Emily shares her story “Foster Care” about a married couple who dedicate their professional and personal lives to the care of foster children. Selwyn shows “Feeding the Little Leaguers” about the 2018 Little League World Series Champions from Hawaiʻi and the importance they placed on local food for staying connected to home while on the road. Rebecca shares her story “Ride Share” on the controversial issue of whether or not minors should be allowed to use ride-sharing services like Uber on their own.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
The Top Stories of the Fall Semester, 2018-2019

HIKI NŌ Episode 1008 – The Top Stories of the Fall Semester, 2018-2019

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the fall semester of the 2018-2019 school year. Each of the stories presents a variation on a theme that has become a hallmark of HIKI NŌ storytelling: empathy.

 

Program

 

–Students at Waiākea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island tell the story of a married couple for whom empathy has become a profession and a way of life: husband and wife both work in the foster care industry and foster children themselves.

 

–Students at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tell the story of a fitness coach who channels his own physical and psychological challenges into developing empathy for his clients.

 

–Students at Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young woman who is grappling depression and has, on occasion, harmed herself. The student storytellers who created this feature deal with this sensitive topic with a great deal of empathy.

 

–Students at Konawaena High School and Konawaena Middle School on Hawai‘i Island collaborated on a story which shows that empathy is not limited to people’s feelings for other people. Human interactions with goats at the Dancing Goat Sanctuary prove that animals often elicit and deserve our empathy.

 

–Students at Kamehameha Schools Maui High School show how one teenager’s empathy for girls who suffer from low self-esteem inspired her to launch a positive self-image workshop for young women.

 

–Students at ‘Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu tell an empathy-driven story about the highly personal connection between a young dancer and her art form.

 

–Students at Waimea High School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a girl’s battle with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in a way that leads viewers from feeling sympathy for to sharing empathy with the young patient.

 

This special episode is hosted by Yasha Ronquillo, a 2018 HIKI NŌ graduate from Maui High School who is currently a part-time HIKI NŌ teacher at her alma mater.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Donut Dynamite and other stories

HIKI NŌ: Episode #1001 - Madame Donut and other stories

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui introduce us to a Filipino immigrant who legally changed her name to Madame Donut. Before opening Donut Dynamite in Wailuku, Maui, she attended culinary school, where one of her instructors was the pastry chef at the famous French Laundry Restaurant in California’s wine country. When she found out the restaurant had donuts on its menu, she decided to make donuts her medium for artistic expression. “I use the donuts kind of as a platform or a canvas to express my art and my life story,” Madam Donut says.

 

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi show us how their high school auto-shop class has moved into the 21st Century.

 

Students from Kalama Intermediate School on Maui explore the incredible hula legacy of Kumu Naomi “Sissy” Lake-Farm.

 

Students from Punahou School on Oʻahu show us how to make a beautiful work of art from a dead fish.

 

Students from Kalani High School in East Honolulu introduce us to a young woman who has discovered who she is by mentoring younger children on the ways of the ocean.

 

Students from ‘Īao School on Maui tell the story of a 6th grader who has created a way to motivate her peers to volunteer for community service.

 

And students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island introduce us to a married couple who dedicates their lives, on and off the job, to foster children.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Compilation Show from the Spring Quarter of the 2018-2019 School Year

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the Spring Quarter of the 2018-2019 school year. Besides being excellent stories, these pieces all explore the connections between people and, in some cases, between people and other living things.

 

Students from McKinley High School in Honolulu tell the story of teenagers who connect with senior citizens in ways that bridge the generation gap.

 

Students from Waiʻanae High School in Central Oʻahu tell the story of a young tattoo artist who uses his art form to connect with his Hawaiian heritage.

 

Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island feature a 96-year-old Holocaust survivor who connects with Big Island students by teaching them about the devastating effects of bigotry and racism.

 

Students from Hilo Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island focus on the special connection between a bone marrow donor and the recipient of that donation who discover (despite the astronomical odds against it happening) that they live just minutes away from one another.

 

Students from Kua O Ka Lā Miloliʻi Hipuʻu Virtual Academy on Hawaiʻi Island follow conservationists who are facilitating the connection between male and female members of an endangered Hawaiian crow in order to save the species from extinction.

 

Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi introduce us to a singing nun who uses music to help students connect with the values she tries to instill in them.

 

Students from Maui High School in Kahului show us how a disabled student makes profound connections with her non-disabled peers through a program developed by the Special Olympics.

 

Students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a pet placement service that connects homeless canines with their forever owners.

 

This special episode is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ graduate from Waiʻanae High School on Oʻahu who has just completed her junior year at Menlo College in Northern California, where she majors in marketing and human resources.

 

 

 

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