Waiakea High School

HIKI NŌ
Compilation Show from the Spring Quarter of the 2018-2019 School Year

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the Spring Quarter of the 2018-2019 school year. Besides being excellent stories, these pieces all explore the connections between people and, in some cases, between people and other living things.

 

Students from McKinley High School in Honolulu tell the story of teenagers who connect with senior citizens in ways that bridge the generation gap.

 

Students from Waiʻanae High School in Central Oʻahu tell the story of a young tattoo artist who uses his art form to connect with his Hawaiian heritage.

 

Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island feature a 96-year-old Holocaust survivor who connects with Big Island students by teaching them about the devastating effects of bigotry and racism.

 

Students from Hilo Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island focus on the special connection between a bone marrow donor and the recipient of that donation who discover (despite the astronomical odds against it happening) that they live just minutes away from one another.

 

Students from Kua O Ka Lā Miloliʻi Hipuʻu Virtual Academy on Hawaiʻi Island follow conservationists who are facilitating the connection between male and female members of an endangered Hawaiian crow in order to save the species from extinction.

 

Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi introduce us to a singing nun who uses music to help students connect with the values she tries to instill in them.

 

Students from Maui High School in Kahului show us how a disabled student makes profound connections with her non-disabled peers through a program developed by the Special Olympics.

 

Students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a pet placement service that connects homeless canines with their forever owners.

 

This special episode is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ graduate from Waiʻanae High School on Oʻahu who has just completed her junior year at Menlo College in Northern California, where she majors in marketing and human resources.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Unified Sports

 

TOP STORY

 

“Unified Sports”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului feature fellow student Britney Bautista. Britney, who has a developmental delay syndrome, has gained a sense of belonging through the school’s Special Olympics Unified Sports program. This program brings students with and without disabilities together to participate in sports, socials, and other extracurricular activities. Britney is also one of only twelve U.S. youth ambassadors to the Special Olympics, which gives her a voice to advocate for the advancement of inclusive youth leadership. “My goal is to introduce Special Olympics to the younger generation,” says Britney. “I want them to learn that everyone is the same, and nobody should be judged by what their physical characteristics look like.”

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy in Waimea on Hawaiʻi Island introduce us to a wahine paniolo champion.

 

Students from Hilo Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a bone marrow donor in Hilo who discovered that the recipient of his bone marrow lives just a few minutes away from him.

 

Students from Hawaiʻi Technology Academy on Oʻahu profile Hawaiʻi’s fledgling ice hockey league.

 

Students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a dedicated group of dog lovers who place homeless canines with their new, forever owners.

 

Students from Mililani High School in Central Oʻahu share a public service announcement about simple changes people can make that will have a positive impact on life in Hawaiʻi.

 

Plus, a montage of HIKI NŌ stories from Saint Francis School on Oʻahu, whose 95-year-old history is ending at the close of this school year.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ also features students’ profiles on their HIKI NŌ teachers.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
#1012 – One in a Million and other stories

HIKI NŌ Episode 1012: One in a Million and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

“One in a Million”
Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu feature two cancer survivors who battled with their diseases at a very early age: Lily Mallory, who was undergoing treatment for her cancer at the age of three, and Emi Robison, who was battling leukemia at the age of seven. The girls’ fathers discuss what it was like dealing with their daughters’ life-threatening illnesses at the time. Phil Mallory, Lily’s father, comments on how scary it was to know that the size of his daughter’s tumor indicated that her chances of survival were not very good. Emi’s father, Ryan Robison, created video games with superheroes who defeated cancer in order to help he and his daughter visualize beating the disease. Lily says the experience taught her that “if you really want something, you gotta work hard for it. Life is short, and you really have to do what you want before you don’t have enough time.”

 

Program

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui profile a cross-fit instructor who helps students find their mojo.

 
–Students from Hilo High School on Hawai‘i Island show the proper way to conduct oneself at a job interview.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Kapālama on O‘ahu show how high school students are discovering the joys of traditional film-based photography.

 

–Students from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island profile a star athlete who faces his toughest opponent off the field: diabetes.

 

–Students from Kea‘au High School on Hawai‘i Island honor the memory of a beloved student who departed far too soon.

 

–Students from Ilima Intermediate School on O‘ahu show us how to make a traditional Maori dance implement.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i introduce us to a unique facility that uses friendship and personal bonds to help treat mental illnesses.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Iao School in Wailuku, Maui.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
#1008 – The Top Stories of the Fall Semester, 2018-2019

HIKI NŌ Episode 1008 – The Top Stories of the Fall Semester, 2018-2019

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the fall semester of the 2018-2019 school year. Each of the stories presents a variation on a theme that has become a hallmark of HIKI NŌ storytelling: empathy.

 

Program

 

–Students at Waiākea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island tell the story of a married couple for whom empathy has become a profession and a way of life: husband and wife both work in the foster care industry and foster children themselves.

 

–Students at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tell the story of a fitness coach who channels his own physical and psychological challenges into developing empathy for his clients.

 

–Students at Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young woman who is grappling depression and has, on occasion, harmed herself. The student storytellers who created this feature deal with this sensitive topic with a great deal of empathy.

 

–Students at Konawaena High School and Konawaena Middle School on Hawai‘i Island collaborated on a story which shows that empathy is not limited to people’s feelings for other people. Human interactions with goats at the Dancing Goat Sanctuary prove that animals often elicit and deserve our empathy.

 

–Students at Kamehameha Schools Maui High School show how one teenager’s empathy for girls who suffer from low self-esteem inspired her to launch a positive self-image workshop for young women.

 

–Students at ‘Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu tell an empathy-driven story about the highly personal connection between a young dancer and her art form.

 

–Students at Waimea High School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a girl’s battle with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in a way that leads viewers from feeling sympathy for to sharing empathy with the young patient.

 

This special episode is hosted by Yasha Ronquillo, a 2018 HIKI NŌ graduate from Maui High School who is currently a part-time HIKI NŌ teacher at her alma mater.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #1001 – Donut Dynamite and other stories

HIKI NŌ: Episode #1001 - Madame Donut and other stories

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui introduce us to a Filipino immigrant who legally changed her name to Madame Donut. Before opening Donut Dynamite in Wailuku, Maui, she attended culinary school, where one of her instructors was the pastry chef at the famous French Laundry Restaurant in California’s wine country. When she found out the restaurant had donuts on its menu, she decided to make donuts her medium for artistic expression. “I use the donuts kind of as a platform or a canvas to express my art and my life story,” Madam Donut says.

 

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi show us how their high school auto-shop class has moved into the 21st Century.

 

Students from Kalama Intermediate School on Maui explore the incredible hula legacy of Kumu Naomi “Sissy” Lake-Farm.

 

Students from Punahou School on Oʻahu show us how to make a beautiful work of art from a dead fish.

 

Students from Kalani High School in East Honolulu introduce us to a young woman who has discovered who she is by mentoring younger children on the ways of the ocean.

 

Students from ‘Īao School on Maui tell the story of a 6th grader who has created a way to motivate her peers to volunteer for community service.

 

And students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island introduce us to a married couple who dedicates their lives, on and off the job, to foster children.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #903 – Young Pig Farmer

 

TOP STORY

Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu tell the story of Matthew Reyes Jr., an enterprising young pig farmer who helps his parent run Reyes’ Hog Farm in Ma‘ili. Matthew is so dedicated to his family’s business that he sacrifices any semblance of a social life. All of his waking hours are taken up by attending high school and working on the pig farm. Through this dedication, he has developed an in- depth knowledge of the pig farming business and a great sense of pride in his profession. He does want to study business once he gets to college because he feels it will give him an edge in this very competitive industry.

 

ALSO FEATURED

–Students from Waīakea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island introduce us to a high school track star who, through the friendship and camaraderie she developed with her teammates and coaches, learned to love a sport she once dreaded.

 

–Students from Kalama Intermediate School in Makawao, Maui, feature a Hawaiian Immersion teacher who connects to her culture by painting words that express its values.

 

–Students from ‘Ilima Intermediate School in ‘Ewa, O‘ahu, tell the story of a young French horn player who learns about herself in the process of learning the music.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle introduce us to a wheelchair-bound school counselor who sees challenges not as obstacles, but as a way to grow.

 

–Students from Kaua‘i High School in Līhu‘e tell the story of young Thai immigrants who learn the value of hard work in Hawai‘i’s fast food industry.

 

–Students from Pacific Buddhist Academy present a primer on the ancient Japanese martial art of kendo.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 18, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Aug. 19, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode # 917: Farmer Larry Yonashiro and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui, profile urban farmer Larry Yonashiro. After a thirty-year career as an I.T. professional, Yonashiro wanted to return to his family’s farming roots (his father worked on a pineapple plantation), but in a modern way. “Agriculture’s been a part of my family for a long time,” says Yonashiro. “I just had it in my blood. I wanted to go back to farming.” So he took up aquaponics, not as a hobby (which is how most aquaponics farmers start) but as an actual commercial farm. With the help of his wife, Patty, and their daughter (who has a background in food science), Yonashiro has joined the thriving sustainable farming movement on Maui.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Punahou School on O‘ahu profile the islands’ youngest beekeeper.

 

–Students from Roosevelt High School on O‘ahu explore a sanctuary for plants native to Hawai‘i.

 

–Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tell the story of a young woman who mends her relationship with her recovered meth-addict father.

 

–Students from Wheeler Middle School on O‘ahu show us how to make a fun and gooey substance known as…SLIME!

 

–Students from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island delve into the fantasy world of cosplay.

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului, Maui, tell the story of a marching band saxophone player who struggles with a degenerative spinal condition.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Kealakehe Intermediate School in the Kona district of Hawai‘i Island.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 914 – Top Story: The Many Faces of Hope

 

This week’s episode of HIKI NŌ spotlights seven of the most outstanding stories from the winter quarter of the 2017-2018 school year. The seven selected stories also share a common theme: hope. The island residents featured in this show each express personal hopes for themselves, their families and their communities. Each one is on a mission to turn that hope into reality.

 

THE STORIES:

–Students from Hongwanji Mission School on O‘ahu go off-the-air with Billy V, a local media celebrity who opens up about the physical and emotional journey that’s accompanied his cancer treatment. Billy V expresses his hope to recover from cancer and continue his fulfilling life and work.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu go aboard the Hōkūle‘a voyaging canoe to show us how the current crew is teaching ancient navigation techniques to a new generation. In this story, Master Navigator Nainoa Thompson shares his hope that younger Hawaiians will take up the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s mission of perpetuating traditional voyaging and the spirit of exploration.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School take us to Noho‘ana Farm in Waikapū to meet a man who is preserving his heritage and his culture by restoring his family’s ancient taro farm. He hopes to share his knowledge and instill a sense of kuleana in younger Hawaiians so they can continue the tradition of kalo farming into the future.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on the Big Island relay the inspirational story of a teacher who hiked the Pacific Crest Trail – from Mexico to Canada – as part of her recovery from the trauma of sexual assault. She hopes this challenge will help her take back control of her body and her life.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu show us how a high school athlete hopes to overcome his short stature to pursue his dream of playing varsity soccer.

 

–Students from Waiākea High School in Hilo on the Big Island introduce us to a man who’s spreading his motto: “Stay Humble, Pray.” This former prisoner visits Hawai‘i high schools to share his story of drug addiction in the hope of persuading students not to make the mistakes he made.

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului introduce us to a family learning to embrace what life brings after their baby is born with the genetic disorder known as Down Syndrome. The Garcias of Pukalani hope their love and devotion will guarantee their daughter’s happiness. And they hope to share their blessings and inspire their neighbors through their family company, Aloha Kettlecorn.

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ is hosted by two students from Farrington High School on O‘ahu: 9th grader Shaylen Tatupu-Timu and 10th grader Harvey Saucedo.

 

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode # 911: Focus On Compassion: Self-Identity, Crystal Cebedo update

 

This episode is an encore presentation of a HIKI NŌ special that first aired in the summer of 2017– HIKI NŌ Focus On Compassion: Self-Identity –hosted and co-written by HIKI NŌ alumna and Wai‘anae High School graduate Crystal Cebedo. This encore presentation includes a brief update on Crystal, who is majoring in Marketing and Human Resources at Menlo College in Atherton, California on a full scholarship.

 

The HIKI NŌ stories in this special look at compassion for self-identity in terms of culture, gender, body image, ethnicity, or appearance. They include:

 

“Calcee Nance” from Kaua‘i High School on Kaua‘i: the story of a teen mentor at the Boys and Girls Club whose instinct to nurture and feed others was inspired by her relationship with her late mother.

 

“Kimberly Yap” from Lahainaluna High School on Maui: the story of a young woman whose decisions about her future are complicated by her multicultural identity as a half Filipina, half Micronesian born in Kiribati and raised on Maui.

 

“Mark Yamanaka” from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu: a feature on Mark Yamanaka, a Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award-winning musician, who overcame internal conflicts about being a non-Hawaiian playing Hawaiian music. He has since been embraced by the Hawaiian music community for his commitment to learning and singing in the Hawaiian language and his skillful guitar playing.

 

“Cosplay” from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island: a look at how cosplay – dressing up as characters from books, movies, or your own imagination – gave a group of high school students the freedom to express their true selves in a creative and fun way.

 

“Body Image” from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: a look at how the images of females onscreen and in magazines had a negative impact on one girl’s self-image and self-confidence.

 

“Through Rachel’s Camera” from ‘Iolani School on O‘ahu: the story of a young woman who uses her camera and art to combat traditional gender stereotypes and to express her identity as a feminist and activist.

 

“Pride and Diversity” from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu: a feature on how the Honolulu Pride Parade and Festival helps support and encourage LGBTQ youth who often don’t see themselves reflected in their school or local communities.

 

“Aurora’s Story” from Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu: a look at how one teacher uses her experience with trichotillomania, an impulse disorder that results in her pulling out her hair, to teach her students about self-acceptance.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 910: Top Story – Kyle Quilausing’s motto: “Stay Humble, Pray”

 

TOP STORY

Students from Waiākea High School in Hilo on the Big Island introduce us to a man who’s spreading his motto: “Stay Humble, Pray.” This philosophy grew out of Kyle Quilausing’s experience during a decade in prison. He now shares his story of drug addiction and the consequences – with Hawai‘i high school students in hopes they can avoid his fate. “Quilly” puts on shackles when he visits schools because he believes showing has greater impact than just telling.  He says his greatest accomplishment is the feedback he gets from students who tell him he has persuaded them not to try drugs.

 

ALSO FEATURED

–Students from Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu show us how a varsity wrestler is excelling at his sport when the small sophomore may look like he is in way over his head.

 

–Students from McKinley High School on O‘ahu explain their “Ignition” mentoring program, and how it is helping anxious incoming freshmen make a smooth transition to high school.

 

–Students from Island School in Līhu‘e on Kaua‘i introduce us to two of their fellow students – brothers who are pushing the boundaries of business and technology as high-tech entrepreneurs.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Upcountry Maui teach us to play the ancient Hawaiian game of konane.

 

–Students from Ilima Intermediate School in ‘Ewa Beach on O‘ahu profile mural artist Hilton Alves who is giving back to Hawai‘i schools while fulfilling his own goal to create 101 waves on walls.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu profile a fitness buff and nutrition advocate who keeps motivating others while going through her own battle with cancer.

 

 

1 2 3