Waiakea High School

HIKI NŌ
Episode #903 – Young Pig Farmer

 

TOP STORY

Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu tell the story of Matthew Reyes Jr., an enterprising young pig farmer who helps his parent run Reyes’ Hog Farm in Ma‘ili. Matthew is so dedicated to his family’s business that he sacrifices any semblance of a social life. All of his waking hours are taken up by attending high school and working on the pig farm. Through this dedication, he has developed an in- depth knowledge of the pig farming business and a great sense of pride in his profession. He does want to study business once he gets to college because he feels it will give him an edge in this very competitive industry.

 

ALSO FEATURED

–Students from Waīakea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island introduce us to a high school track star who, through the friendship and camaraderie she developed with her teammates and coaches, learned to love a sport she once dreaded.

 

–Students from Kalama Intermediate School in Makawao, Maui, feature a Hawaiian Immersion teacher who connects to her culture by painting words that express its values.

 

–Students from ‘Ilima Intermediate School in ‘Ewa, O‘ahu, tell the story of a young French horn player who learns about herself in the process of learning the music.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle introduce us to a wheelchair-bound school counselor who sees challenges not as obstacles, but as a way to grow.

 

–Students from Kaua‘i High School in Līhu‘e tell the story of young Thai immigrants who learn the value of hard work in Hawai‘i’s fast food industry.

 

–Students from Pacific Buddhist Academy present a primer on the ancient Japanese martial art of kendo.

 

This program encores Saturday, Aug. 18, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Aug. 19, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode # 917: Farmer Larry Yonashiro and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui, profile urban farmer Larry Yonashiro. After a thirty-year career as an I.T. professional, Yonashiro wanted to return to his family’s farming roots (his father worked on a pineapple plantation), but in a modern way. “Agriculture’s been a part of my family for a long time,” says Yonashiro. “I just had it in my blood. I wanted to go back to farming.” So he took up aquaponics, not as a hobby (which is how most aquaponics farmers start) but as an actual commercial farm. With the help of his wife, Patty, and their daughter (who has a background in food science), Yonashiro has joined the thriving sustainable farming movement on Maui.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Punahou School on O‘ahu profile the islands’ youngest beekeeper.

 

–Students from Roosevelt High School on O‘ahu explore a sanctuary for plants native to Hawai‘i.

 

–Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui tell the story of a young woman who mends her relationship with her recovered meth-addict father.

 

–Students from Wheeler Middle School on O‘ahu show us how to make a fun and gooey substance known as…SLIME!

 

–Students from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island delve into the fantasy world of cosplay.

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului, Maui, tell the story of a marching band saxophone player who struggles with a degenerative spinal condition.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Kealakehe Intermediate School in the Kona district of Hawai‘i Island.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 914 – Top Story: The Many Faces of Hope

 

This week’s episode of HIKI NŌ spotlights seven of the most outstanding stories from the winter quarter of the 2017-2018 school year. The seven selected stories also share a common theme: hope. The island residents featured in this show each express personal hopes for themselves, their families and their communities. Each one is on a mission to turn that hope into reality.

 

THE STORIES:

–Students from Hongwanji Mission School on O‘ahu go off-the-air with Billy V, a local media celebrity who opens up about the physical and emotional journey that’s accompanied his cancer treatment. Billy V expresses his hope to recover from cancer and continue his fulfilling life and work.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu go aboard the Hōkūle‘a voyaging canoe to show us how the current crew is teaching ancient navigation techniques to a new generation. In this story, Master Navigator Nainoa Thompson shares his hope that younger Hawaiians will take up the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s mission of perpetuating traditional voyaging and the spirit of exploration.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School take us to Noho‘ana Farm in Waikapū to meet a man who is preserving his heritage and his culture by restoring his family’s ancient taro farm. He hopes to share his knowledge and instill a sense of kuleana in younger Hawaiians so they can continue the tradition of kalo farming into the future.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on the Big Island relay the inspirational story of a teacher who hiked the Pacific Crest Trail – from Mexico to Canada – as part of her recovery from the trauma of sexual assault. She hopes this challenge will help her take back control of her body and her life.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu show us how a high school athlete hopes to overcome his short stature to pursue his dream of playing varsity soccer.

 

–Students from Waiākea High School in Hilo on the Big Island introduce us to a man who’s spreading his motto: “Stay Humble, Pray.” This former prisoner visits Hawai‘i high schools to share his story of drug addiction in the hope of persuading students not to make the mistakes he made.

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului introduce us to a family learning to embrace what life brings after their baby is born with the genetic disorder known as Down Syndrome. The Garcias of Pukalani hope their love and devotion will guarantee their daughter’s happiness. And they hope to share their blessings and inspire their neighbors through their family company, Aloha Kettlecorn.

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ is hosted by two students from Farrington High School on O‘ahu: 9th grader Shaylen Tatupu-Timu and 10th grader Harvey Saucedo.

 

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode # 911: Focus On Compassion: Self-Identity, Crystal Cebedo update

 

This episode is an encore presentation of a HIKI NŌ special that first aired in the summer of 2017– HIKI NŌ Focus On Compassion: Self-Identity –hosted and co-written by HIKI NŌ alumna and Wai‘anae High School graduate Crystal Cebedo. This encore presentation includes a brief update on Crystal, who is majoring in Marketing and Human Resources at Menlo College in Atherton, California on a full scholarship.

 

The HIKI NŌ stories in this special look at compassion for self-identity in terms of culture, gender, body image, ethnicity, or appearance. They include:

 

“Calcee Nance” from Kaua‘i High School on Kaua‘i: the story of a teen mentor at the Boys and Girls Club whose instinct to nurture and feed others was inspired by her relationship with her late mother.

 

“Kimberly Yap” from Lahainaluna High School on Maui: the story of a young woman whose decisions about her future are complicated by her multicultural identity as a half Filipina, half Micronesian born in Kiribati and raised on Maui.

 

“Mark Yamanaka” from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu: a feature on Mark Yamanaka, a Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award-winning musician, who overcame internal conflicts about being a non-Hawaiian playing Hawaiian music. He has since been embraced by the Hawaiian music community for his commitment to learning and singing in the Hawaiian language and his skillful guitar playing.

 

“Cosplay” from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island: a look at how cosplay – dressing up as characters from books, movies, or your own imagination – gave a group of high school students the freedom to express their true selves in a creative and fun way.

 

“Body Image” from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: a look at how the images of females onscreen and in magazines had a negative impact on one girl’s self-image and self-confidence.

 

“Through Rachel’s Camera” from ‘Iolani School on O‘ahu: the story of a young woman who uses her camera and art to combat traditional gender stereotypes and to express her identity as a feminist and activist.

 

“Pride and Diversity” from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu: a feature on how the Honolulu Pride Parade and Festival helps support and encourage LGBTQ youth who often don’t see themselves reflected in their school or local communities.

 

“Aurora’s Story” from Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu: a look at how one teacher uses her experience with trichotillomania, an impulse disorder that results in her pulling out her hair, to teach her students about self-acceptance.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 910: Top Story – Kyle Quilausing’s motto: “Stay Humble, Pray”

 

TOP STORY

Students from Waiākea High School in Hilo on the Big Island introduce us to a man who’s spreading his motto: “Stay Humble, Pray.” This philosophy grew out of Kyle Quilausing’s experience during a decade in prison. He now shares his story of drug addiction and the consequences – with Hawai‘i high school students in hopes they can avoid his fate. “Quilly” puts on shackles when he visits schools because he believes showing has greater impact than just telling.  He says his greatest accomplishment is the feedback he gets from students who tell him he has persuaded them not to try drugs.

 

ALSO FEATURED

–Students from Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu show us how a varsity wrestler is excelling at his sport when the small sophomore may look like he is in way over his head.

 

–Students from McKinley High School on O‘ahu explain their “Ignition” mentoring program, and how it is helping anxious incoming freshmen make a smooth transition to high school.

 

–Students from Island School in Līhu‘e on Kaua‘i introduce us to two of their fellow students – brothers who are pushing the boundaries of business and technology as high-tech entrepreneurs.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Upcountry Maui teach us to play the ancient Hawaiian game of konane.

 

–Students from Ilima Intermediate School in ‘Ewa Beach on O‘ahu profile mural artist Hilton Alves who is giving back to Hawai‘i schools while fulfilling his own goal to create 101 waves on walls.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu profile a fitness buff and nutrition advocate who keeps motivating others while going through her own battle with cancer.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 909: Top Story – The pros and cons of using Uber and other ride-sharing services

 

TOP STORY
Students from Sacred Hearts Academy in Kaimuki on O‘ahu explore the pros and cons of using Uber and other ride-sharing services. The main issues raised by students, parents and drivers revolve around convenience versus safety for young riders. The story also explains Uber’s policy that restricts minors from riding alone, a fact of which many teenagers and parents are unaware. The student reporters learn that Uber is testing a service for teens in several cities, though not yet here in Hawai‘i.

 

ALSO FEATURED
–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School explain how their robotics coach found his passion while teaching students to stretch their tech expertise.

 

–Students from Farrington High School in Kalihi on O‘ahu introduce us to an alum who has devoted decades to preserving the school’s history and spreading a positive message about the school and its students.

 

–Students from the Montessori School of Maui Middle School explore the pervasive problem of bullying and offer tips for students dealing with bullies at school.

 

–A student from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i shows and tells us how Tahitian dance has helped her relieve stress, enjoy life and preserve her cultural traditions.

 

–Students from Waiākea High School in Hilo on the Big Island profile a student athlete who proves that determination can overcome her physical disadvantage and beat the competition.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Focus on Compassion: Self-Identity

 

The third of four Focus on Compassion HIKI NŌ episodes compiles archived stories that center on the theme of compassion for self-identity. This four-episode series is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ and Wai‘anae High School graduate who is currently attending Menlo College in Atherton, California. The stories in this episode look specifically at compassion for self-identity in terms of culture, gender, body image, ethnicity, or appearance.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this Focus on Compassion show include:

 

“Calcee Nance” from Kaua‘i High School on Kaua‘i: the story of a teen mentor at the Boys and Girls Club whose instinct to nurture and feed others was inspired by her relationship with her late mother.

 

“Kimberly Yap” from Lahainaluna High School on Maui: the story of a young woman whose decisions about her future are complicated by her multicultural identity as a half-Filipina, half-Micronesian born in Kiribati and raised on Maui.

 

“Mark Yamanaka” from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu: a feature on Mark Yamanaka, a Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award-winning musician, who overcame internal conflicts about being a non-Hawaiian playing Hawaiian music. He has since been embraced by the Hawaiian music community for his commitment to learning and singing in the Hawaiian language and his skillful guitar playing.

 

“Cosplay” from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island: a look at how cosplay – dressing up as characters from books, movies, or your own imagination – gave a group of high school students the freedom to express their true selves in a creative and fun way.

 

“Body Image” from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: a look at how the images of females onscreen and in magazines had a negative impact on one girl’s self-image and self-confidence.

 

“Through Rachel’s Camera” from ‘Iolani School on O‘ahu: the story of a young woman who uses her camera and art to combat traditional gender stereotypes and to express her identity as a feminist and activist.

 

“Pride and Diversity” from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu: a feature on how the Honolulu Pride Parade and Festival helps support and encourage LGBTQ youth who often don’t see themselves reflected in their school or local communities.

 

“Aurora’s Story” from Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu: a look at how one teacher uses her experience with trichotillomania, an impulse disorder that results in her pulling out her hair, to teach her students about self-acceptance.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 23, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 24, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode #824

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ highlights some of the best stories from the spring quarter of the 2016-2017 school year. The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this compilation show include:

 

“Mochi Pounding” from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui:
The story of a Maui family who continues their annual New Year’s tradition of mochi pounding, despite the recent passing of the family matriarch.

 

“Tough Vice-Principal” from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu:
A classic “don’t judge a book by its cover” story about a vice-principal whose tough exterior belies her heart of gold.

 

“Fashion Entrepreneurs” from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu:
Two Honolulu-based fashion entrepreneurs mentor young local designers who are trying to break into the business.

 

“Tie-Dye Artist” from Kalani High School in East Honolulu:
Inspired by 1960s cultural icons like The Beatles, a Honolulu teenager launches her own line of tie-dye clothing.

 

“Diabetic Athlete” from Waiakea High School in the Hilo district of Hawai‘i Island:
A star high school athlete faces his toughest opponent off the court: Type 1 Diabetes.

 

“Pedestrian Walking Flags” from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu:
A woman takes it upon herself to sew red flags that are held up by pedestrians as they cross the notoriously dangerous crosswalks in Waiʻanae. The red flags go a long way in alerting drivers that there are pedestrians crossing in front of them.

 

“The Fact of You” from Kaua‘i High School in Lihue:
A personal essay about identifying one’s authentic nature and remaining true to it.

 

“Ukrainian Student” from Nānākuli High and Intermediate School in West O‘ahu:
The story of a foreign exchange student from Ukraine who embraces and reciprocates the Aloha Spirit she finds in Nānākuli.

 

This special compilation show is hosted by Moanalua High School student Camryn Tabiolo, who will be entering her school’s HIKI NŌ program in the fall of 2017.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 2, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 3, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

THE 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards
Part Two

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ features highlights from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards live-streamed announcements of the winners.

 

On Saturday, March 11th, the results of the 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards were announced by PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO Leslie Wilcox and PBS Hawai‘i Board Member Aaron Salā in a four-island, closed-circuit, live-stream awards show originating from the PBS Hawai‘i studio on O‘ahu. HIKI NŌ teachers and students from the nominated schools gathered at their respective locations to watch the announcements: Paliku Theatre at Windward Community College on O‘ahu; McCoy Theater at the Maui Arts & Cultural Center on Maui; the Kaua‘i Marriott Resort on Kaua‘i; Honua Studios in Kona; and the Waiakea High School library in Hilo. Each time an award was announced, the teacher and students from the winning school came onstage to accept their award from a PBS Hawai‘i Board member: a bronze medal for third place, silver for second place and gold for first. Gold medalists also won a $1,000 gift card to purchase equipment for their school’s media program.

 

This episode picks up where we left off in last week’s show by featuring the medal-winning schools (and their projects) for Best Franchise Piece, Best Factoid, Best Achievement in Cinematography and Editing, Best Overall Story Middle School Division, and Best Overall Story High School Division.

 

This program encores Saturday, July 15, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, July 16, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

THE 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards
Part One

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ features highlights from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards live-streamed announcements of the winners.

 

On Saturday, March 11th, the results of the 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards were announced by PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO Leslie Wilcox and PBS Hawai‘i Board Member Aaron Salā in a four-island, closed-circuit, live-stream awards show originating from the PBS Hawai‘i studio on O‘ahu. HIKI NŌ teachers and students from the nominated schools gathered at their respective locations to watch the announcements: Paliku Theatre at Windward Community College on O‘ahu; McCoy Theater at the Maui Arts & Cultural Center on Maui; the Kaua‘i Marriott Resort on Kaua‘i; Honua Studios in Kona; and the Waiakea High School library in Hilo. Each time an award was announced, the teacher and students from the winning school came onstage to accept their award from a PBS Hawai‘i Board member: a bronze medal for third place, silver for second place and gold for first. Gold medalists also won a $1,000 gift card to purchase equipment for their school’s media program.

 

This episode features the medal-winning schools (and their stories) for Best Personal Profile Middle School Division, Best Personal Profile High School Division, Best Writing Middle School Division and Best Writing High School Division.

 

The remainder of the awards will be covered in next week’s show: The 2017 HIKI NŌ AWARDS, Part 2.

 

This program encores Saturday, July 8, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, July 9, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


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