Waianae High School

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX
Original Thinkers

LONG STORY SHORT WITH LESLIE WILCOX: Original Thinkers

 

Look back on three guests who trusted their instincts and possessed unwavering confidence in the choices they made. We revisit our conversations with the late Hawai‘i State Supreme Court Chief Justice William S. Richardson, Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu) educator Candy Suiso and video game creator-turned-philanthropist Henk Rogers.

 

 

This program will be rebroadcast on Sunday, Oct. 14, at 4:00 pm and 11:30 pm.

 

Original Thinkers Audio

 

Download the Transcript

 

Transcript

 

It’s a monumental decision that affects us every day.

 

William S.  Richardson:

It does, and I go swimming too.  And I know I can walk to a certain spot, and this is public property.  And my friends and I can use it.

 

Candy Suiso:

And for our kids, we want them to be the best at whatever they choose to be.  And be honest, contributing citizens to our community.  To come back, to give back, and just to do what’s right in life.  Do what’s right, even when no one’s watching.

 

Henk Rogers:

The game business is bigger than the movie business.  Sometimes, I see young people, and they go: I want to be a game designer, I want to get into the game business.  To get into the game business today, you can’t just be good; you have to be brilliant.

 

How can you spot a truly creative mind, an innovator and problem-solver?  Do they share similar personality traits?  Are they smarter than the rest of us?  More confident, more daring.  Coming up on Long Story Short, three very different, all practitioners of original thinking.

 

One-on-one engaging conversations with some of Hawai‘i’s most intriguing people: Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox.

 

Aloha mai kākou.  I’m Leslie Wilcox.  Original thinkers reveal themselves as they assume a variety of roles within our community. What is that special motivation or skill that inspired a chief justice, a public schoolteacher, and a videogame creator turned philanthropist?  All three trusted their instincts, their sense of priority and free-thinking.

 

First, we’ll turn to a 2009 conversation with a man known as CJ, a nickname given to the late Hawai‘i State Supreme Court Chief Justice William S. Richardson.  He was a public school graduate who grew up in a working class Kaimukīfamily during the 1920s.  He championed Hawai‘i’s Democratic Party during its rise to power in the 50s, and served as lieutenant governor during the John Burns administration.  He was the State’s chief justice during some of the most formative years in Hawai‘i’s history, when a young island state searched for its sense of identity and fundamental values.

 

You were one of the people that was excited about statehood, that helped to make it happen, that recrafted government in the wake of statehood.  And now, we’re coming up on the fiftieth anniversary of statehood, 2009.  Many Hawaiians don’t see that as cause for celebration.

 

Well … to me, it’s great cause for celebration. We’re part of a great country. Like every other state in the union, they had to come up and live, and have their new laws jive with the old. Even if you go back to England, where the common law came over, and if you looked at the way the law went across the country right through the Louisiana Purchase where the French came in, and the country had to adjust to that.  And now, we must still look at how it affects the Far East and all the other countries and states and islands throughout the Pacific Ocean.

 

Part of what is now, is based on the Great Māhele, King Kamehameha III.  And it was a distribution of land.  Do you think that was pono?

 

I think it’s pono.  I think our leaders of the past were as good as any that ever existed, that our Hawaiian ways were just ways of living.  And Hawai‘i should revive what we could of the good parts. And I would say almost all of it were good parts.

 

You could have used the English law as a precedent, but often, you would look back to see what ali‘i from the Monarchy days did.

 

Well, whenever I could, whatever the history books would come up with on old Hawai‘i and what few things that I had picked up over the years, I felt that I should try to apply those to the extent that we could.

 

For example, when the question came, who owns the new land being created by lava from the volcano, what was the answer of your court?

 

Well, that seemed easy enough for me, but I know the beaches were needed in Hawai‘i.  Without our beaches, there was no Hawai‘i to speak of, the Hawai‘i that we loved.

 

Now, in many parts of the continent, the beaches are private property; right?

 

Yes.  It seemed perfectly logical to me that people should be able to use the beaches, and that the property lines could not follow all of the methods of old England, say, and that I should try to bring those cases up in line to the way the Hawaiians did it.

 

And that wasn’t the only big one you did.  There were the rights of citizens to challenge Land Court decisions, Native Hawaiian rights, and use of private property water.

 

Again, I wasn’t that much of an expert on Hawaiian law.  But I had a good court.  They were willing and able go and look at all of the problems, and see what was going on. And I traveled around the islands a lot. And you’re speaking now perhaps of water right, which was so important, because we were a plantation community. And you get to a case like when two plantations began to argue over how much water they could have.  They both needed water.  But when a third one began to take too much water, to the detriment of some of the others, then you had to decide whose water should it be.  The Robinson case in the end was clear to me, but it seemed revolutionary, I suppose.  But the people who really needed the water were those on the bottom of the streams, the taro patch and the rice patch owners.  They’re the ones that needed the water.  And so, it seemed simple to me to just say: Well, neither of you is entitled to all of that water; it’s the people down below, the taro patch owners and the rice patch owners.

 

It’s elegantly simple.  I actually talked with the dean of the law school, which is named after you.  Avi Soifer said imagine, you know, very complicated filings, going on for years, big battle, and you said: Well, let’s take a look at what’s happening at the end of the line.

 

Well, and we were a new state, not used to following and just being a follower.  We needed to decide to decide for ourselves what was best for our people.

 

You took some heat over that.

 

I did.

 

But it became a symbol of enlightenment.  People said, you know, here’s a far-thinking guy using the past to build on the future.

 

Well, of course, I’m glad to hear you say that. And I thought it was right.  There was never any question in my own mind.

 

Chief Justice William Richardson, for whom the law school at the University of Hawai‘i is named, was an original thinker, in the right place at the right time, and his legacy is embedded in the constitutional laws of our state.

 

Sometimes, the journey that brings the right original thinker to the right place and time is really not much of a journey at all, but no less impactful. In our 2009 conversation with Candy Suiso, she said that when she graduated from Wai‘anae High School, she thought she wanted to get away from the Leeward Coast community, and never come back.  Thankfully, this second-generation teacher and Milken Award winning educator had a change of heart.  Although she would insist on sharing the credit, today, Suiso’s legacy is the national Emmy Award winning Searider Productions at Wai‘anae High School.  It is not only the largest, most successful digital media center any school in the state, it’s the driving force behind a movement to improve a challenged community from within.

 

I wanted to make a difference.  I wanted to give back to a community that was very good to me.  I really felt that that’s where I was the most needed.  It felt right.  I wanted to be home.  I wanted to be in a community that raised me.  And it was the right thing to do; I just felt that that was the right thing to do. And it was the right decision, when I look back.

 

Much of what you’ve done at Wai‘anae High School wasn’t done, really, within the system.  You had to find ways to equip yourself and your students with grants.  You had to become a grant writer to get the proper equipment, the space.

 

M-hm.  Within the DOE, there’s so many limitations, and there’s only so much money to go around. And part of our success is, I believe we’ve learned to work around the system, and been very successful in, like you said, going after a lot of grants.  A lot of support, pulling together partners, pulling together people that believe in you; that’s been our success.  We had to prove our self.  You know, like you said, the right people at the right time started to notice these students, and started to give.  Because they were doing things with nothing.  When we first started, we started in a classroom with no air conditioning, with very little equipment.

 

And by the way, heat isn’t just bad for people.

 

It’s so bad.

 

It’s bad for equipment.

 

We would pack fifty kids, forty kids in a classroom, and it was hot, and no air conditioning.  But you know, those kids never grumbled.  They never grumbled because they didn’t have an air-conditioned room or top of the line equipment, like a lot of other schools did.  Instead, they just started to create projects, and they did some pretty good projects, and people started to notice.  That’s what happens; people started to notice.

 

How did they know they could do that?  What got them started?

 

You give them the tools.  As educators, you know, the team of educators, there was enough people out there that said: You can do it; of course, you can do it. Make a video; here, here’s the tool, here’s the camera.  Here’s your tool; here’s how you do it.

 

The essence of video production, as I look at it, is storytelling.  What kind of experience do you think your students had in storytelling?

 

They are born with the gift to tell a story. I really believe their success is because they are born with the gift to create.  The kids out in Wai‘anae, I really believe, are the most creative, loving storytellers.  Because they grow up; they don’t grow up with a lot.  I really believe that they don’t grow up with a lot, so they entertain themselves by playing the ‘ukulele, sitting around talking story, they draw, they doodle, they sing.  And it carries over.  When they come to us, they’re so strong, their heartfelt creativity carries over with this tool.  All of a sudden, we have these expensive toys now that we give them, and we say: Go create. And they’re great.

 

And they just take to it.

 

And it’s amazing; it’s incredible.

 

You didn’t have the star pupils of Wai‘anae High School.  Some of your kids were doing really poorly in other classes, they were reporting to school from their homes on the beach in tents.

 

M-hm.  We have the homeless, we have kids whose parents have been in jail, they are abused, they come to us.  You know, a lot of dysfunction; so much.  And you know, that’s my world; I grew up there, and I know that world.  And they come to us, and we give them hope.  For a lot of these kids, it’s their security. We’re their family.  We teach them a tool, and they become successful at it. And they see something that they create, and for their self-esteem, it’s: Wow, I did that.  You know, it gives them hope.  And they realize: I have just learned something that I can do for life.  And a lot of these kids’ lives have been turned around.  They would have dropped out, I really believe.  And they’ll tell us that too: If it wasn’t for this class, I would have dropped out, or I didn’t know I was gonna go to college, or I didn’t know what I wanted to do with my life.  And now, so many of our kids are college graduates.

 

They’re being recruited by television stations.

 

They’re being recruited.

 

And advertising agencies.

 

Yes, yes, yes, yes.

 

I remember when your Seariders first started doing public service announcements for various clients, you invited the business community to hire the kids and said, “We’ll see what we can come up with for you.” And I just remember as a professional television person at that time, how the students’ work had so much more depth than what you would normally see in a PSA, a public service announcement, because the kids knew that world, as you mentioned.  When it was about crystal meth, they brought a reality to it that nobody had brought before.

 

These kids know what it’s like to living in houses and homes where there’s crystal meth, where they have to be in a car where someone’s been drinking.

 

They know how it hurts.

 

They know how it hurt.  And it was their stories.  If you look at any of those PSAs, those are their stories.  That was either them, or that was someone they knew, and they were able to come up with the ideas from the heart, from real life.  And I think that’s what makes their work so powerful.  It’s real stories.  They tell their stories.  Whether it’s a news story, a public service announcement, a commercial, they’re just telling their story.

 

Tell me about if can, can.

 

If can, can; if no can, no can.  Because you know, there’s nothing worse, we feel, than saying you’re gonna do something, and not do it, and not follow through. And we tell these kids: If you’re gonna do something, if you’re gonna say you’re gonna do something, hold yourself to it and do it, follow through and do it.  Because really, there’s nothing worse than not completing something that you’ve committed to.  And if we could teach them now in school, it will carry over in life, in a job, in a marriage, in a relationship.

 

And when you work in teams, you know other people are counting on you.

 

Yes; ‘cause it’s teamwork.  And the good thing about our program is, every project that these kids do is a team effort.  And we always think, when you leave our program, if you have learned nothing about video production, about creating a web page, about page layout, a newspaper, we hope you’ve really learned the importance of teamwork, cooperation—

 

And getting things done on time.

 

Meeting deadlines, respect, respect for self, respect for other people, respect for property.  So, if you’re gonna say you’re gonna do something, you better do it, because if you don’t, you’re dropping the ball for your teammates.  But just don’t say you’re gonna do something if you can’t do it, ‘cause you let everybody down.  So, if can, can; if no can, no can.  And it’s been our mantra.  And the kids, they get it; the kids get it.

 

Where do you think this movement will take the Wai‘anae Coast?

 

I hope eventually it will take them out of poverty. It might take decades, but this is certainly a start.  You have a group of young adults that are really making a difference, because they have come back to the Wai‘anae Coast, and they are giving back, and they believe in themselves, and they’re believing in the students that are under them.  And they are trying very hard to prove to the rest of the world that we’re just as good as everybody else, if you just give us a chance.

 

Perhaps educator Candy Suiso would have provided inspiration for our next original thinker, who nearly dropped out of high school.  In 2016, visionary entrepreneur Henk Rogers told us that he took the one and only elective course offered at Stuyvesant High School in New York City.  When he learned everything there was to know about that elective in computer science, he saw no reason to remain in school.  But he did graduate from high school, and Henk Rogers has made a fortune in the video gaming industry, most notably for bringing Tetris, one of the world’s top-selling videogames, from Russia to the rest of the world.  More recently, this Hawai‘i resident and visionary entrepreneur has turned his talents to no less than saving the planet. He made that leap when suddenly confronted with just how fragile his own life could be.

 

I found myself in the back of an ambulance with a hundred percent blockage of the widow-maker.  That is the artery, the biggest artery in your heart, and it will kill you if it’s blocked.  And so, I was lucky, ‘cause I kind of felt it coming, and they called an ambulance for me, and so, I was already on the way to Straub.  And then, I realized, because they were gonna take me in for observation; they said: There’s nothing really wrong with you, we’ll just take you in for observation, we won’t even turn on the siren.  The siren went on, the guy who was taking care of me was in the cockpit talking to the hospital and saying—I didn’t hear, but I knew he was saying: This guy is not even gonna make it, get an operation room ready, an operating room ready, blah-blah-blah.  And I’m back there saying: You gotta be kidding me; I haven’t spent any of the money yet.  You know.   I was going: Oh, is this some kind of a joke?  I worked so hard all my life, and finally sell my company, get a bunch of money, and I’m on the say out?  And then, the second thing I said: No, I’m not going, I still have stuff to do.  And it’s kind of like, I thought, you know, what are the things that I’ve always talked to myself that I was gonna get done in life, and that I hadn’t even started?  And that just made me say: No, I’m gonna do this.  And so, I was in the hospital recovering, and the next couple weeks I didn’t go back to work.  I had my chance to think about my bucket list.  And I said: These are missions in life.  And the first mission came to me in the back of the newspaper.  It was like, in the back of the newspaper, it had a story about coral.  Oh, by the way, we’re gonna kill all the coral in the world by the end of the century. And you know, I moved to Hawai‘i, and I fell in love with the ocean.  I used to dive, surf on the North Shore, and I couldn’t believe that we would do something so callous as to kill all the coral in the world.  Islands are made out of coral.  And you know, you look a little bit further, and it’s like a third of the life in the ocean is dependent on the coral existing.  So, I said: No, no, we’re not allowed to do that. What’s causing that?  It’s ocean acidification.  What’s causing that?  Carbon dioxide going into the ocean is causing that.  So then, my first mission is to end the use of carbon-based fuel. And so, I started the foundation, and recently, we had a big success in Hawai‘i, that Hawai‘i has made the mandate that they were gonna be a hundred percent renewable by 2045, for electricity. And that is a huge step in the right direction.

 

And your Blue Planet Foundation had a role in that.

 

Oh, I would say we’re the ones who created that legislation and fought for it.  And, you know, ‘cause when you create a piece of legislation, then you have to work with all the politicians, and you gotta get enough politicians to get behind it, to get it passed.  So, it’s not good enough to just come up with the words, ‘cause it’s—it’s all the pushing that goes on.  I guess it’s called lobbying.

 

Yes, it is.

 

And you’re already off the grid at your home in Honolulu, and on the ranch.

 

Yes.  So, we were studying storage, and we finally decided that we were gonna just get off the grid on the Big Island.  And so, we tested the different storage technologies, and now we ended up with a battery technology that basically runs by itself.

 

What are some of the things that prepared you to have the career you did, which was something you made up yourself?  You didn’t follow a template for it.  What were some of the formative things along the way?

 

I think one of the things is that I always had a deep-rooted feeling that whatever it is that I wanted to do, I could do it.

 

Where did that come from?

 

I think it came from New York.  It’s kind of an attitude that we had in high school.  We stopped the war in Vietnam.  Okay; we didn’t specifically, but we were part of it. And that kind of energy, the feeling that youth can change the world, and that is a very important feeling. And I need the young people in Hawai‘i to have that feeling.  They need to take ownership of their future, and make Hawai‘i the example of sustainability.

 

This videogame creator, environmentalist, the public schoolteacher, and the chief justice; three original thinkers.  What they seem to share is an unwavering persistence to push, to get it right, and have confidence in the choices they make. We’re honored to revisit our conversation with the late Chief Justice William Richardson, and we thank Candy Suiso and Henk Rogers for their inspiring stories.  I’m Leslie Wilcox for Long Story Short.  Mahalo to you for joining us.  Aloha nui.

 

For audio and written transcripts of all episodes of Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, visit PBSHawaii.org.  To download free podcasts of Long Story Short with Leslie Wilcox, go to the Apple iTunes Store or visit PBSHawaii.org.

 

Were you ambitious?

 

Not that I know of.

 

But you went ahead, and went through four years at UH.

 

I went four years at UH, and enjoyed it all the way through.

 

Met a lot of people who would later be your allies in politics.

 

Yes, yes.

 

And good friends.

 

Good friends; they helped me in everything I’ve done.

 

You went to UH, and you had more than most people of your time had, a college degree, but that wasn’t gonna be the end of your higher education.

 

Well, I thought it was, but I had a job with the oil company, and I thought: Well, this would be great, I like this kind of work; I think I’ll do this the rest of my life.  And then, one of the professors up at school went to see my father, and he said: Now, this boy better go on to law school.  And well, how can you do that Dad; you can’t afford it.  Well, he said: You know, if you’re really gonna go, I’ll rent your room out, and you go on to college.  Which he did.  In those days, it was five days by steamship, and another four days by train to get to the East Coast.

 

Your mom was a legendary teacher on the Wai‘anae Coast; right?

 

Oh, thirty-one years of her life, she dedicated her life to teaching out there.  And really, that was her life.  She impacted a community, and thirty years, just taught at Mākaha Elementary School.  She went there, and she never left.  I know the principal would always throw all of these hardcore kids and say: Okay, Mrs. Smith, you’re the one that’s gonna take these kids. And she would turn them around. She was mean, but she was very strict, and she was very fair, and she loved them all.  And she did; she turned a lot lives around.

 

When I started my company, I used my Hawai‘i experience of ARRG, which is playing Dungeons & Dragons.  And personal computers happened, and I thought: This is my chance.  So, I made the first roleplaying game in Japan.  But I didn’t speak, read, or write Japanese, and I hacked that computer and got my wife to try to read something in the manual, but she knows nothing about computers.  And so, that was also like hocus-pocus that was coming out of them.  Anyway, I hacked my way through the game, made it.  So, there were no roleplaying games before The Black Onyx, and it became the number-one game in 1984, and it was the number-two game in 1985.  So, it had a two-year reign.  And now, something like thirty percent of all games in Japan are roleplaying games. So, you know, people that are in the industry that meet me and find out that I wrote Black Onyx, they say: Oh, my god, you’re the reason I’m in this industry, you know.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 907 – 2017/2018 Fall Semester Compilation

 

This special compilation show features some of the top stories from the Fall Semester of the 2017/2018 school year. In all of the selected stories, HIKI NŌ students explore the truth about the people they are featuring.

 

TOP STORY
Students from Moanalua High School in the Salt Lake district of O‘ahu profile Perry “Mooch” Fernandez, a surf instructor headquartered at the “Bowls” break near Ala Moana Beach Park. Halfway through the story, it is revealed that “Mooch”, having separated from his wife, lives out of his van. He not only survives, he thrives – through exchanges of kindnesses with the close-knit community of surfers who consider him a fixture, a mentor, and the center of their lives at “Bowls.”

 

ALSO FEATURED
–Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a Maui Waena Intermediate School student who does not let his disability, caused by a genetic spinal condition, hold him back from pursuing sports, music and all the joys of life.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of a woman who discovered her truth through her life-long commitment to dance.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle tell the story of wheelchair-bound school counselor who, after his debilitating diving accident, found his truth by connecting to a Higher Power.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu tell the story of a high school student who finds his truth in his aspiration to carry on his parent’s pig farming business.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i discover the truth of how a Vietnam War veteran copes with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i show how a video about a special-needs elementary school student produced by a classmate led to a greater understanding and acceptance by the student’s peers.

 

–Students from Kaua‘i High School in Lihu‘e express their concerns about their generation’s over-reliance on screens to see and experience the world around them.

 

This special compilation show is hosted by Brooke Kanna and Haven Luper-Jasso, two HIKI NŌ students from Kaua‘i High School who were among the students that participated in PBS Hawai‘i’s live town hall special KĀKOU: Have You Fact-checked Your Truth?

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 15, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 16, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode # 906 – 2017 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge

 

This episode features stories from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge. In September of 2017, five high schools and nine middle schools participated in a challenge in which teams had exactly four days to conceptualize, shoot, write, and edit a HIKI NŌ story based on a specific theme. No work could be done on the stories prior to the production window because the theme was not revealed until the start of the four-day sprint. The theme of this challenge was “What it’s Like to Walk in Another Person’s Shoes.” No teachers, or adults of any kind, could provide hands-on assistance. It was all up to the students.

 

TOP STORIES
Included in this episode are the winners of the Middle School and High School Divisions of the 2017 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge. The Middle School winners were from ‘Ewa Makai Middle School in the ‘Ewa district of O‘ahu. Their story “Lolita” features a drag queen in his early 20s who explains how taking on his drag persona of Lolita gives him confidence and helps him cope with a sometimes difficult life. The winning High School story, “Hurricane Harvey Relief,” was created by students at Kalaheo High School in Windward O‘ahu. It follows a group of volunteers who put themselves in the shoes of Houston’s Hurricane Harvey victims and helped to collect goods toward the relief effort.

 

ALSO FEATURED
–Students from Maui High School created a story about what it’s like to walk in the shoes of a teen transitioning to a new gender.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i featured the school band president who is successful at what he does because he tries to walk in the shoes of his fellow musicians.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu stress the importance of empathy in dealing with people who suffer from a very painful condition known as Fibromyalgia.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle show us that walking in the shoes of someone who moved to Hawaiʻi for a better life helps us to better appreciate our island home.

 

–Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i help us to consider what it’s like being a teenager who is prone to suicide.

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului tell the story of a cobbler who creates custom shoes for people who can’t wear conventional footwear.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 8, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 9, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 914 – Top Story: The Many Faces of Hope

 

This week’s episode of HIKI NŌ spotlights seven of the most outstanding stories from the winter quarter of the 2017-2018 school year. The seven selected stories also share a common theme: hope. The island residents featured in this show each express personal hopes for themselves, their families and their communities. Each one is on a mission to turn that hope into reality.

 

THE STORIES:

–Students from Hongwanji Mission School on O‘ahu go off-the-air with Billy V, a local media celebrity who opens up about the physical and emotional journey that’s accompanied his cancer treatment. Billy V expresses his hope to recover from cancer and continue his fulfilling life and work.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu go aboard the Hōkūle‘a voyaging canoe to show us how the current crew is teaching ancient navigation techniques to a new generation. In this story, Master Navigator Nainoa Thompson shares his hope that younger Hawaiians will take up the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s mission of perpetuating traditional voyaging and the spirit of exploration.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School take us to Noho‘ana Farm in Waikapū to meet a man who is preserving his heritage and his culture by restoring his family’s ancient taro farm. He hopes to share his knowledge and instill a sense of kuleana in younger Hawaiians so they can continue the tradition of kalo farming into the future.

 

–Students from Konawaena High School on the Big Island relay the inspirational story of a teacher who hiked the Pacific Crest Trail – from Mexico to Canada – as part of her recovery from the trauma of sexual assault. She hopes this challenge will help her take back control of her body and her life.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu show us how a high school athlete hopes to overcome his short stature to pursue his dream of playing varsity soccer.

 

–Students from Waiākea High School in Hilo on the Big Island introduce us to a man who’s spreading his motto: “Stay Humble, Pray.” This former prisoner visits Hawai‘i high schools to share his story of drug addiction in the hope of persuading students not to make the mistakes he made.

 

–Students from Maui High School in Kahului introduce us to a family learning to embrace what life brings after their baby is born with the genetic disorder known as Down Syndrome. The Garcias of Pukalani hope their love and devotion will guarantee their daughter’s happiness. And they hope to share their blessings and inspire their neighbors through their family company, Aloha Kettlecorn.

 

This special edition of HIKI NŌ is hosted by two students from Farrington High School on O‘ahu: 9th grader Shaylen Tatupu-Timu and 10th grader Harvey Saucedo.

 

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode # 910: Top Story – Kyle Quilausing’s motto: “Stay Humble, Pray”

 

TOP STORY

Students from Waiākea High School in Hilo on the Big Island introduce us to a man who’s spreading his motto: “Stay Humble, Pray.” This philosophy grew out of Kyle Quilausing’s experience during a decade in prison. He now shares his story of drug addiction and the consequences – with Hawai‘i high school students in hopes they can avoid his fate. “Quilly” puts on shackles when he visits schools because he believes showing has greater impact than just telling.  He says his greatest accomplishment is the feedback he gets from students who tell him he has persuaded them not to try drugs.

 

ALSO FEATURED

–Students from Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu show us how a varsity wrestler is excelling at his sport when the small sophomore may look like he is in way over his head.

 

–Students from McKinley High School on O‘ahu explain their “Ignition” mentoring program, and how it is helping anxious incoming freshmen make a smooth transition to high school.

 

–Students from Island School in Līhu‘e on Kaua‘i introduce us to two of their fellow students – brothers who are pushing the boundaries of business and technology as high-tech entrepreneurs.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Upcountry Maui teach us to play the ancient Hawaiian game of konane.

 

–Students from Ilima Intermediate School in ‘Ewa Beach on O‘ahu profile mural artist Hilton Alves who is giving back to Hawai‘i schools while fulfilling his own goal to create 101 waves on walls.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu profile a fitness buff and nutrition advocate who keeps motivating others while going through her own battle with cancer.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #823

 

This episode features stories from the 2017 HIKI NŌ Spring Challenge, in which production teams from HIKI NŌ schools took the challenge of creating stories on the theme Mālama Honua (Taking Care of Our Island Planet) over three days. The theme – which is based on the mission of the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s world-wide voyage – was revealed to the students at the beginning of the three-day production time limit.

 

TOP STORY
Students from Nānākuli High and Intermediate School on O‘ahu present their interpretation of Mālama Honua in a story about Veronika Sumyatina, a foreign exchange student from war-torn Ukraine who finds a new home, and the meaning of aloha, at Nānākuli High and Intermediate School. Veronika explains that home is much more than a roof over one’s head – home is “where your heart is.” By accepting an outsider as one of their own, the Nānākuli students do their part in taking care of our island planet.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu feature a female angler whose love of fishing is matched only by her respect for the eco-system from which she partakes.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu follow a woman who volunteers to mend and replace the pedestrian walking flags that keep people safe when crossing the very dangerous Farrington Highway.

 

–Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu feature the OSPCA, a non-profit organization that cares for abandoned and neglected cats and dogs.

 

–Students from Punahou School on O‘ahu follow a group of motivated community members who are cleaning up Kawainui Marsh in Kailua.

 

–Students from Kalama Intermediate School in Upcountry Maui show how recycling is a way of life on their campus.

 

–Students from Kapolei High School on O‘ahu follow the eco-friendly phenomenon of Hydro Flasks.

 

This episode is hosted by Hali‘amaile Kealoha and Hulukoa Nunokawa, both seniors at Kamehameha School Kapālama.

 

This program encores Sunday, Nov. 12, at 12:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: ‘Ike pono

This episode is the fifth in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is ‘ike pono, which means to know what is right. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Maui Waena Intermediate School who feature Christopher Malik Cousins, owner of the Farmacy Health Bar in Wailuku, Maui. Cousins had been a troubled youth, often in trouble with the law and even living on the streets. Being fed at Saint Theresa’s Church in Kihei eventually inspired him to do the right thing and open his own health food restaurant. His motivation for opening the business was not to make money, but to provide his family and community with healthy snacks, to employ people who need a helping hand (like he did), and to encourage his customers to “pay-it-forward” by contributing to a program that helps to feed the hungry with healthy foods. “I went from someone who wasn’t doing Maui any good to someone who is making a difference,” says Cousins.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Waianae Intermediate School (Oahu): Sosefina Matautia, once a self-professed bully at Waianae Intermediate School, decided to do the right thing and change her ways. While becoming a kinder, better person benefitted those around her, Sosefina was motivated to change because of her own dreams of someday becoming a doctor.

 

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui): Led by math teacher Debi Davis, Seabury Hall Middle School students do the right thing for the less fortunate by weaving colorful yarn hats that are distributed around the world to help brighten the lives of underprivileged children.

 

Kealakehe High School (Hawaii Island): Students and other community members in Kona do the right thing by banding together to build Habitat for Humanity homes for families on the Hawaiian Homes wait list.

 

Waianae High School (Oahu): Sometimes doing what you know is right requires great sacrifice. Sometimes doing what is right means doing less for yourself. Such is the case with Waianae High School student Daisy Agae, whose grades suffer because she has to take care of her two younger brothers, one of whom is a special needs child born with debilitating medical conditions.

 

Hawaii Preparatory Academy (Hawaii Island): Hawaii Island resident William ”Black” Abraham was headed down the wrong path as a young adult, until he decided to do the right thing and dedicate his life to saving lives. He did so by becoming an Ocean Safety Officer at Hapuna Beach and is now inspiring the next generation of lifesavers through his Junior Lifeguard training program.

 

Kamehameha Schools Maui High (Maui): An East Maui couple do the right thing by taking in and caring for animals with debilitating and life-threatening illnesses. As a result, their home has become the East Maui Animal Refuge, more affectionately known as the Boo-Boo Zoo. This episode is hosted by Waiakea Intermediate School in Hilo, Hawaii.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 3 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 4 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Focus on Compassion: Animals

 

The final installment of the four-part Focus on Compassion HIKI NŌ series focuses on peoples’ compassion toward animals, including house pets, working pets, exotic animals and endangered species. Like the previous three shows, this episode is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ and Wai‘anae High School graduate who is currently attending Menlo College in Atherton, California.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this Focus on Compassion show include:

 

–“Dog Adoption” from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i: a look at a creative program initiated by the Kaua‘i Humane Society to promote dog adoptions through visitors taking the animals on nearby field trips.

 

–“Towards No More Homeless Pets” from Lahaina Intermediate School on Maui: a feature on the spay/neuter clinic conducted by the Maui Humane Society to compassionately address and prevent the overpopulation of homeless cats on the island.

 

–“Three Ring Ranch” from Kealakehe High School on the island of Hawai‘i: the story of how one woman’s life work to protect and educate about exotic animals was inspired by the animals who helped her recover from a debilitating accident.

 

–“Passion for Service” from Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui: the story of a young woman who spent almost half her life volunteering at Assistance Dogs of Hawaii, a program that trains dogs to assist people with special needs.

 

–“Wounded Warriors” from Waialua High and Intermediate School on O‘ahu: a feature on the work of Hawaii Fi-do, an organization that trains service companion dogs, and the positive impact one of their companion dogs had on a Schofield soldier in the Wounded Warrior Project.

 

–“Nene” from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i: a look at the multi- state agency project of removing a flock of nene, Hawai‘i’s state bird, nesting on Kaua‘i Lagoon between the two runways at Līhu‘e Airport to a safer location for the birds and the public.

 

–“Mālama NOAA” from Āliamanu Middle School on O‘ahu: a feature on the efforts of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to protect and preserve the endangered Hawaiian monk seal population through medical care of sick or injured seals, the enforcement of laws, and through community education.

 

–“Hokulani” from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu: the story of a Pomeranian that spreads joy wherever it goes.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 30, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Oct. 1, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Focus on Compassion: Parents and Children

 

The second of four in a special HIKI NŌ Focus on Compassion series emphasizes the unique and sometimes misunderstood relationship between parent and child. This four-episode series is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ and Wai‘anae High School graduate in her second year at Menlo College in Atherton, California.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this Focus on Compassion show include:

 

–“Father Coach” from Hongwanji Mission School on O‘ahu: the story of a father and son whose bond and mutual respect developed and deepened through their additional roles as coach and player.

 

–“Parental Guidance Required” from Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu: a look at how the tough love of a parent has sharpened one student wrestler’s competitive spirit and prepared her with the skills and mindset for life outside the ring.

 

–“Racing Sakamotos” from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i: the story of how a father’s passion for drag racing passed down to his children and united the entire family around the discipline and detail of this exhilarating sport.

 

–“Lucy’s Lab Creamery” from Saint Francis School on O‘ahu: the story of a young entrepreneur who uses his ice cream parlor to simultaneously honor the memory of his late mother and raise money for charity.

 

–“The Comedy of Life” from Maui High School on Maui: a look at the mental and emotional adjustments made as a daughter becomes the caretaker of her mother with Alzheimer’s.

 

–“Silent Passion” from Nanakuli High and Intermediate School on O‘ahu: the story of a mother, who despite her inability to hear, enthusiastically supports her son’s passion for singing, dancing and theater.

 

–“Anti-Meth Teen” from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui: the story of a teen whose father’s past addiction inspired her volunteerism and gave her a platform for helping her peers rise above difficult circumstances.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 16, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 17, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Focus on Compassion: Kūpuna

 

The first of four Focus on Compassion HIKI NŌ episodes drawn from the archives compiles stories that center on the topic of kūpuna, or elders. This show is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ and Wai‘anae High School graduate who is currently attending Menlo College in Atherton, California on a full scholarship. In this episode, the stories highlight the compassion we feel towards our elders or the compassion our kūpuna show us.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this Focus on Compassion show include:

 

–“Elder-Student Talk” from Aliamanu Middle School on O‘ahu: a look at the wisdom shared by The Elders, a group of former global leaders, to Hawaii’s youth and young adults at the Pillars of Peace Conference.

 

–“Papa Fu” from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i: the story of a 101-year old man and the lessons he’s learned and shares from his long life.

 

–“Taro Farmer” from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i: the story of Kinichi Ishikawa, a 98-year-old 442nd Regimental Combat Team veteran and a life-long farmer, who continues to work the land and mentor the next generation of farmers.

 

–“Scam Story” from Kainalu Elementary School on O‘ahu: a cautionary tale of how senior citizens can fall prey to scam artists and advice on how people can avoid this kind of financial exploitation.

 

–“Remember What’s Important” from Wai‘anae High School on O‘ahu: a look at how a family is drawn together in their creative and compassionate efforts to care for the family matriarch who has dementia.

 

–“Adult Day Care” from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: a feature on how the Maui Adult Day Care Center addresses the needs of the senior population with a staff committed to the nurture, vitality and personalized care of its clients.

 

–“Losing a Parent” from Hilo High School on Hawai‘i Island: the story of how the love of her grandparents helped stabilize one high school student’s life despite the loss of a parent.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 9, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 10, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

1 2 3 4