Waianae Intermediate School

HIKI NŌ
Episode #1003 – Dancing Goat Sanctuary on Hawai‘i Island and other stories

HIKI NŌ: Episode #1003 - Dancing Goat Sanctuary on Hawai‘i Island and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Konawaena Middle School and Konawaena High School in Kealakekua join forces to tell the story of the Dancing Goat Sanctuary on Hawai‘i Island. The sanctuary is situated on an organic farm and is dedicated to providing abused, orphaned and abandoned goats with a safe environment in which to thrive. Youth and animal advocate Shawna Gunnarson utilizes the goats for an afterschool program at the sanctuary that teaches students how to treat animals compassionately, setting a path for both animals and youth to build lasting connections.

 
Program

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i show how to take simple steps towards developing your own personal style.

 

–Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui show how to get started learning American Sign Language.

 

–Also from Baldwin, the story of a fitness coach who overcame his own personal struggles to become a motivating force in peoples’ lives.

 

–Students from Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu introduce us to a teacher who has turned a sustainable garden into a special place of learning.

 

–Students from Pomaika‘i Elementary School on Maui tell us the history of the musubi in Hawai‘i and show us the right way to make one.

 

–Students from Maui High School tell the story of Maui-based painter Philip Sabado and how he re-connected with his Hawaiian culture.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 921: Compilation of stories from Season 9

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the spring quarter of the 2017-2018 school year. Each of the stories presents an excellent example of an element that is essential to successful dramatic storytelling: change.

 

–Students at Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului tell the story of a former I.T. professional who makes a mid-life career change by returning to his family’s farming roots – but in a modern, 21st century way.

 

–Students at Waia‘nae Intermediate School in West O‘ahu tell the story of a young woman whose desire to join the men’s football team at her school causes people close to her to change their attitudes.

 

–Students at Sacred Hearts Academy in the Kaimukī district of O‘ahu follow the change from student to career professional in a mentoring program known as Girls Got Grit.

 

–Students at Wheeler Middle School in Central O‘ahu show how simple ingredients like flour and glue change into a gooey and creative substance that will keep kids occupied for hours on end.

 

–Students at Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani profile a fitness instructor who helps senior citizens adapt to the physical changes that occur in the aging process.

 

–Students at Dole Middle School in the Kalihi district of O‘ahu highlight a very basic form of change: learning something new. In this case, we learn how to perform a traditional Filipino dance known as the tinikling.

 

–Students from H.P. Baldwin High School in Wailuku, Maui, follow a young man through his grueling recovery after the car he was driving was struck by a drunk driver.

 

–Students from Ewa Makai Middle School on O‘ahu follow the change in a dog as she goes from being homeless to finding her permanent, forever home.

 

This special episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by two aspiring journalists from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu: Shelby Mattos and Rebecca Meyer.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 916: Athlete Leihali‘a Panui and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

Students from Wai‘anae Intermediate School in West O‘ahu tell the story of Leihali‘a Panui, a female place-kicker and senior at Kamehameha Schools Kapalama who played on the school’s men’s varsity football team during the 2017 season. At first Leihali‘a’s father was not sure he wanted his daughter playing football, but Lei’s mother said, “I told my husband, ‘Who are we to say whether Leihali‘a can or cannot play football? We’ll just leave it up to the coaches and let them decide if she’s good enough for the team.’” The coaches decided Leihali‘a was good enough and welcomed her onto the team. Once he saw his daughter playing, Dad was won over: “It’s an amazing feeling seeing my daughter on the field playing football and hearing the spectators cheering her on.” Says Leihali‘a, “If you love something and you’re passionate about it, I would definitely think you should go for it 110% with all your heart because you don’t want to look back ten years later and regret it. Life is too short to have any regrets.”

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu tell the story of a street performer turned painter who finds an enthusiastic audience in Waikīkī.

 

–Students from James Campbell High School in Leeward O‘ahu tell the story of a child of divorce who finds solace and a new family in dance.

 

–Students from Kapa‘a High School on Kaua‘i explore the reasons why their town has the largest concentration of Mexican restaurants in the state.

 

–Students from Aiea High School on O‘ahu show us how to make a money lei (a very popular lei among graduates).

 

–Students from Kua O Ka Lā Miloli‘i Hipu‘u Virtual Academy on Hawai‘i Island tell us about the traditional Hawaiian practice of ‘ōpelu fishing.

 

–Students from Ka Waihona o Ka Na‘auao Public Charter School tell the story of the instrument that made Hawaiian music popular around the world: the steel guitar.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Kaiser High School in East O‘ahu.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode # 911: Focus On Compassion: Self-Identity, Crystal Cebedo update

 

This episode is an encore presentation of a HIKI NŌ special that first aired in the summer of 2017– HIKI NŌ Focus On Compassion: Self-Identity –hosted and co-written by HIKI NŌ alumna and Wai‘anae High School graduate Crystal Cebedo. This encore presentation includes a brief update on Crystal, who is majoring in Marketing and Human Resources at Menlo College in Atherton, California on a full scholarship.

 

The HIKI NŌ stories in this special look at compassion for self-identity in terms of culture, gender, body image, ethnicity, or appearance. They include:

 

“Calcee Nance” from Kaua‘i High School on Kaua‘i: the story of a teen mentor at the Boys and Girls Club whose instinct to nurture and feed others was inspired by her relationship with her late mother.

 

“Kimberly Yap” from Lahainaluna High School on Maui: the story of a young woman whose decisions about her future are complicated by her multicultural identity as a half Filipina, half Micronesian born in Kiribati and raised on Maui.

 

“Mark Yamanaka” from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu: a feature on Mark Yamanaka, a Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award-winning musician, who overcame internal conflicts about being a non-Hawaiian playing Hawaiian music. He has since been embraced by the Hawaiian music community for his commitment to learning and singing in the Hawaiian language and his skillful guitar playing.

 

“Cosplay” from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island: a look at how cosplay – dressing up as characters from books, movies, or your own imagination – gave a group of high school students the freedom to express their true selves in a creative and fun way.

 

“Body Image” from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: a look at how the images of females onscreen and in magazines had a negative impact on one girl’s self-image and self-confidence.

 

“Through Rachel’s Camera” from ‘Iolani School on O‘ahu: the story of a young woman who uses her camera and art to combat traditional gender stereotypes and to express her identity as a feminist and activist.

 

“Pride and Diversity” from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu: a feature on how the Honolulu Pride Parade and Festival helps support and encourage LGBTQ youth who often don’t see themselves reflected in their school or local communities.

 

“Aurora’s Story” from Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu: a look at how one teacher uses her experience with trichotillomania, an impulse disorder that results in her pulling out her hair, to teach her students about self-acceptance.

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Hawaiian Value: ‘Ike pono

This episode is the fifth in a series of six shows in which each episode focuses on a specific Hawaiian value. The Hawaiian value for this show is ‘ike pono, which means to know what is right. Each of the following stories reflects this theme:

 

The top story comes from the students at Maui Waena Intermediate School who feature Christopher Malik Cousins, owner of the Farmacy Health Bar in Wailuku, Maui. Cousins had been a troubled youth, often in trouble with the law and even living on the streets. Being fed at Saint Theresa’s Church in Kihei eventually inspired him to do the right thing and open his own health food restaurant. His motivation for opening the business was not to make money, but to provide his family and community with healthy snacks, to employ people who need a helping hand (like he did), and to encourage his customers to “pay-it-forward” by contributing to a program that helps to feed the hungry with healthy foods. “I went from someone who wasn’t doing Maui any good to someone who is making a difference,” says Cousins.

 

Also featured are student-created stories from the following schools:

 

Waianae Intermediate School (Oahu): Sosefina Matautia, once a self-professed bully at Waianae Intermediate School, decided to do the right thing and change her ways. While becoming a kinder, better person benefitted those around her, Sosefina was motivated to change because of her own dreams of someday becoming a doctor.

 

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui): Led by math teacher Debi Davis, Seabury Hall Middle School students do the right thing for the less fortunate by weaving colorful yarn hats that are distributed around the world to help brighten the lives of underprivileged children.

 

Kealakehe High School (Hawaii Island): Students and other community members in Kona do the right thing by banding together to build Habitat for Humanity homes for families on the Hawaiian Homes wait list.

 

Waianae High School (Oahu): Sometimes doing what you know is right requires great sacrifice. Sometimes doing what is right means doing less for yourself. Such is the case with Waianae High School student Daisy Agae, whose grades suffer because she has to take care of her two younger brothers, one of whom is a special needs child born with debilitating medical conditions.

 

Hawaii Preparatory Academy (Hawaii Island): Hawaii Island resident William ”Black” Abraham was headed down the wrong path as a young adult, until he decided to do the right thing and dedicate his life to saving lives. He did so by becoming an Ocean Safety Officer at Hapuna Beach and is now inspiring the next generation of lifesavers through his Junior Lifeguard training program.

 

Kamehameha Schools Maui High (Maui): An East Maui couple do the right thing by taking in and caring for animals with debilitating and life-threatening illnesses. As a result, their home has become the East Maui Animal Refuge, more affectionately known as the Boo-Boo Zoo. This episode is hosted by Waiakea Intermediate School in Hilo, Hawaii.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 3 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 4 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Focus on Compassion: Self-Identity

 

The third of four Focus on Compassion HIKI NŌ episodes compiles archived stories that center on the theme of compassion for self-identity. This four-episode series is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ and Wai‘anae High School graduate who is currently attending Menlo College in Atherton, California. The stories in this episode look specifically at compassion for self-identity in terms of culture, gender, body image, ethnicity, or appearance.

 

The outstanding HIKI NŌ stories in this Focus on Compassion show include:

 

“Calcee Nance” from Kaua‘i High School on Kaua‘i: the story of a teen mentor at the Boys and Girls Club whose instinct to nurture and feed others was inspired by her relationship with her late mother.

 

“Kimberly Yap” from Lahainaluna High School on Maui: the story of a young woman whose decisions about her future are complicated by her multicultural identity as a half-Filipina, half-Micronesian born in Kiribati and raised on Maui.

 

“Mark Yamanaka” from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu: a feature on Mark Yamanaka, a Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award-winning musician, who overcame internal conflicts about being a non-Hawaiian playing Hawaiian music. He has since been embraced by the Hawaiian music community for his commitment to learning and singing in the Hawaiian language and his skillful guitar playing.

 

“Cosplay” from Waiākea High School on Hawai‘i Island: a look at how cosplay – dressing up as characters from books, movies, or your own imagination – gave a group of high school students the freedom to express their true selves in a creative and fun way.

 

“Body Image” from Maui Waena Intermediate School on Maui: a look at how the images of females onscreen and in magazines had a negative impact on one girl’s self-image and self-confidence.

 

“Through Rachel’s Camera” from ‘Iolani School on O‘ahu: the story of a young woman who uses her camera and art to combat traditional gender stereotypes and to express her identity as a feminist and activist.

 

“Pride and Diversity” from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu: a feature on how the Honolulu Pride Parade and Festival helps support and encourage LGBTQ youth who often don’t see themselves reflected in their school or local communities.

 

“Aurora’s Story” from Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu: a look at how one teacher uses her experience with trichotillomania, an impulse disorder that results in her pulling out her hair, to teach her students about self-acceptance.

 

This program encores Saturday, Sept. 23, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Sept. 24, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 


HIKI NŌ
Episode #822

 

TOP STORY:
Students from Wai‘anae High School in West O‘ahu tackle the controversy surrounding commercial dolphin tours. On August 23, 2016, NOAA (the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) published a regulation prohibiting tour boats from being within 50 yards of a spinner dolphin, including swimming with them. This regulation has caused a major downturn in business for ocean tour companies such as Sea Hawaii, which claims it has seen a 90% decrease in revenues since the ruling was put into effect.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
–Middle school students from Island School on Kaua‘i teach us how to make a puka shell necklace.

 

–Students from Kalaheo High School in Windward O‘ahu tell us about a camp for the siblings of young cancer patients.

 

–Students from Mid-Pacific on O‘ahu introduce us to education innovator Ted Dintersmith.

 

–In their HIKI NŌ debut, students from Highlands Intermediate School on O‘ahu show us how to salsa dance.

 

–Students from President William McKinley High School in Honolulu tell the story of a McKinley alumnus and banker who has dedicated a great deal of his life to America’s pastime.

 

–Students at Wai‘anae Intermediate School in West O‘ahu report on a new program on their campus designed to get kids to show up for school.

 

–And the students at Kalani High School in East Honolulu feature a young tie-dye designer who channels the spirit of the 1960s in her clothing line.

 

This program encores Saturday, June 17, at 12:00 pm and Sunday, June 18, at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #814 – Best Overall Story, Middle School Division

 

The sixth in a series of seven 2017 HIKI NŌ Award nominee shows highlights the nominees for Best Overall Story, Middle School Division:

 

–“Dog Wheelchair” by Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kaua‘i;

 

–“Firefighter” by Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i;

 

–“Steel Guitar” by Ka Waihona o Ka Na‘auao Public Charter School on O‘ahu;

 

–“Haleakala Mules” by Seabury Hall Middle School on Maui;

 

–“A Home for Larenzo” by Wai‘anae Intermediate School on O‘ahu.

 

This episode is hosted by Noah Faumuina from Castle High School (O‘ahu) and Kukui Raymond from Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu).

 

This program encores Saturday, March 4 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, March 5 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 



2017 HIKI NŌ AWARDS RESULTS

HIKI NŌ Awards Nominees March 23, 2017

 

The 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards

PBS Hawai‘i recognizes exceptional storytelling skills of middle and high school students throughout our Islands who participate in HIKI NŌ, our statewide digital learning initiative and student news program.

 

The nominees were chosen from HIKI NŌ shows that aired during the 2015-2016 school year and the Fall Semester of this current school year. You can view each nominated piece by clicking on its name in the list below. (You can also watch the nominated projects, by category, Thursdays at 7:30 pm, Saturdays at noon, and Sundays at 3:00 pm on PBS Hawai’i.)

 

This year’s Gold, Silver and Bronze winners are indicated below. Winning stories, as well as highlights from this year’s awards celebrations, will be featured on our two-part 2017 HIKI NŌ Awards Show, Thursday, March 23 and Thursday, March 30 at 7:30 pm on PBS Hawai‘i. Congratulations to all nominees and winners – and mahalo to all the students, teachers and mentors who help make HIKI NŌ a success in our public, private and charter schools throughout Hawai‘i.

 


 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Aliamanu Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Homeschooled Student” SILVER

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Moses Hamilton” GOLD

Hongwanji Mission School (O‘ahu) – “Laurie Rubin” BRONZE

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Joe Young”

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui) – “John Plunkett”

 

BEST PERSONAL PROFILE — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

H.P. Baldwin High School (Maui) – “Bipolar Artist”

James Campbell High School (O‘ahu) – “Miracle Baby” GOLD

Maui High School (Maui) – “Marc Unites”

Mid-Pacific (O‘ahu) – “Ukulele Hale” BRONZE

Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu) – “Living With Pain” SILVER

 

BEST WRITING — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Aliamanu Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Front Office”

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “K-9 Search & Rescue” GOLD

Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle (Maui) – “Feed My Sheep”

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Love Laundry” BRONZE

Lahaina Intermediate School (Maui) – “Airconditioning”

Mililani Middle School (O‘ahu) – “Mokauea Island” SILVER

 

BEST WRITING — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

Kapolei High School (O‘ahu) – “Best Buddies Basketball”

Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i) – “Biomass” GOLD

Kua O Ka La Miloli‘i Hipu‘u Virtual Academy PCS (Hawai‘i Island) – “Opelu Fishing” BRONZE

Sacred Hearts Academy (O‘ahu) – “Text Neck” SILVER

Saint Francis School (O‘ahu) – “Lucy’s Lab Creamery”

Waiakea High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “Cosplay”

 

BEST OVERALL STORY — MIDDLE SCHOOL DIVISION

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Dog Wheelchair”

Kapaʻa Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Firefighter”

Ka Waihona o Ka Naʻauao PCS (O‘ahu) – “Steel Guitar” BRONZE

Seabury Hall Middle School (Maui) – “Haleakala Mules” SILVER

Wai‘anae Intermediate School (O‘ahu)– “A Home For Larenzo” GOLD

 

BEST OVERALL STORY — HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION

H.P. Baldwin High School (Maui) – “Life After Sugar”

Kapa‘a High School (Kaua‘i) – “Iloreta Brothers” GOLD

Konawaena High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “A Love Story”

Maui High School (Maui) – “Deaf Cheerleader” BRONZE

Waiʻanae High School (O‘ahu) – “Without Home” SILVER

 

BEST FRANCHISE PIECE

Hana K-12 (Maui) – “Ti Leaf Print”

Kalani High School (O‘ahu) – “Thaumatrope”

Kapa‘a Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “10 Things To Do When You’re NOT On Your Smartphone” GOLD

Kaua‘i High School (Kaua‘i) – “Hurricane Protection” BRONZE

Moloka‘i High School (Moloka‘i) “Text-A-Tip

Pacific Buddhist Academy (O‘ahu) – “Offering Incense” SILVER

 

BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN CINEMATOGRAPHY & EDITING

Kapa‘a Middle School (Kaua‘i) – “Junior Lifeguard”

Maui High School (Maui) – “Tourette” GOLD

Moanalua High School (O‘ahu) – “Equestrian” SILVER

Sacred Hearts Academy (O‘ahu) – “IUCN”

Wai‘anae High School (O‘ahu) – “Parental Guidance Required” BRONZE

 

BEST FACTOID

Hana K-12  (Maui) – “School History”

Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy (Hawai‘i Island) – “Solar Trees” GOLD

Konawaena High School (Hawai‘i Island) – “Wildcats”

Mililani High School (O‘ahu) – “Red Dirt” BRONZE

President William McKinley High School (O‘ahu) – “School Spirit” SILVER

 

HIKI NŌ
Episode #804

 

TOP STORY
Students from Kapa‘a Middle School on Kaua‘i tell the story of Dustin Alfiler, Hanalei Fire Department captain, and the important role his family plays in balancing out his life. When he is off duty his family comes first, and he expresses how their commitment supports him in his often precarious and dangerous profession.

 

ALSO FEATURED:
Students at Wai‘anae Intermediate School tell the story of a former media student who finds purpose in his life as a media teacher at the Wai‘anae Boys and Girls Club.

 

Students at Kalani High School in East O‘ahu demonstrate how to make a thaumatrope – a simple device made from paper and string that creates rudimentary forms of animation.

 

Students from Sacred Hearts Academy on O‘ahu tell of youth involvement at the recent World Conservation Congress held at the Hawai’i State Convention Center. Their story includes an interview with U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell.

 

Students from Waiakea High School in Hilo introduce us to the hard-hitting, elbow-jabbing world of women’s roller derby.

 

And students from Moanalua High School on O‘ahu introduce us to a young equestrian who has dedicated her life to the riding and care of horses.

 

This program encores Saturday, Dec. 10 at 12:00 pm and Sunday, Dec. 11 at 3:00 pm. You can also view HIKI NŌ episodes on our website, www.pbshawaii.org/hikino.

 

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