Water

INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI
Who Manages Our Water?

 


Water – a necessity in our daily lives that we often take for granted. Imagine a day with no access to water to drink, to water the garden or to flush a toilet. How much do we know about the systems that handle our drinking water, or what happens to the water runoff from heavy rainfall? Join the discussion on INSIGHTS ON PBS HAWAIʻI. You can phone in, or leave us a comment on Facebook or Twitter.

 

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INDEPENDENT LENS
What Lies Upstream

 

In the unsettling exposé What Lies Upstream, investigative filmmaker Cullen Hoback travels to West Virginia to study the unprecedented loss of clean water for over 300,000 Americans in the 2014 Elk River chemical spill. There he uncovers a shocking failure of regulation from both state and federal agencies and a damaged political system where chemical companies often write the laws that govern them. While he’s deep into his research in West Virginia, a similar water crisis strikes Flint, Michigan, revealing that the entire system that Americans assume is protecting their drinking water is fundamentally broken.

 

 

LIFE ON THE REEF
Part 2 of 3

 

The Great Barrier Reef is one of the richest and most complex natural ecosystems on earth – home to a stunning array of animals, from microscopic plankton to 100-ton whales. From the coral cays of the outer reef to the Islands of the Torres Strait, the reef’s human residents work to find that critical balance between our needs and those of an ever-diminishing natural world.

 

Part 2 of 3
Witness the explosion of life as the wet season approaches: corals spawn, sea birds nest and thousands of turtle hatchlings erupt over the beaches. Soon torrential rain and storms will bring change and upheaval to the delicate ecosystem.

 

LIFE ON THE REEF
Part 1 of 3

 

The Great Barrier Reef is one of the richest and most complex natural ecosystems on earth – home to a stunning array of animals, from microscopic plankton to 100-ton whales. From the coral cays of the outer reef to the Islands of the Torres Strait, the reef’s human residents work to find that critical balance between our needs and those of an ever-diminishing natural world.

 

Part 1 of 3
On the most protected island in Australia, 20,000 green sea turtles return to the biggest reptilian breeding colony on Earth.