Kauaʻi

HIKI NŌ 12|5|19: 2019-2020 Student Television Network Challenge

 

This special edition features stories created by HIKI NŌ students that were submitted to the national Student Television Network (STN) competition in the News Feature category.  Participating student teams were given six days to conceptualize, organize, shoot, write and edit a story based on a particular theme, which was not announced until the beginning of the six-day production window.  The theme for this challenge was: Role Models.

 

TOP STORY

 

“For You”
Students from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu tell the story of Lexton Butay-Joseph, a Waiʻanae High School senior whose uncle and role model passed away under tragic circumstances.  Lexton had never been close with his father, but through their shared grief over Lextonʻs uncle (his fatherʻs brother), a bond between father and son has been forged.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Young Champion”
Students from Waiʻanae Intermediate School in West Oʻahu tell the story of Logyn Lynn Puahala, a nine-year-old female judo champion who serves as a role model to her best friend and fellow judo student Eli Oshiro.  The story also features Logynʻs judo coach and role model, her father Robin Puahala.

 

“Period Hawaiʻi”
Students from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu tell the story of Courtney Coleman, the lead organizer of Period Hawaiʻi.  Courtney was inspired to take on this position by Nadya Okimoto, the founder of the national Period Movement. Period Hawaiʻi fights for access to menstrual hygiene products for all Hawaiʻi women (whether they be homeless, incarcerated or otherwise unable to afford the products).

 

“Uncle Russell”
Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi tell the story of a Kauaʻi man who has become a role model to many because of his volunteer work for the Foodbank and for teaching water sports to handicapped children and adults.

 

“Mana Wahine”
Students from ʻEwa Makai Middle School on Oʻahu tell the story of Alexis Akiona, a young fashion designer who looks to her mother as her role model.  Alexis credits her mother for teaching her how to be a strong woman, or mana wahine.

 

“Role Model Teacher/Dad”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani tell the story of an elementary school teacher who straddles his dual life as a role model for his students and for his offspring.

 

“Homecoming”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a young woman who was once trapped in the foster care system and is now paying it forward by helping children who are going through the same hardship.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 11|14|19:
The Effects of Deployment on Families and Other Stories

 

TOP STORY

 

“The Effects of Deployment on Families”
Students from Aliamanu Middle School in the Salt Lake district of Oʻahu explore the effects of military deployment on family members. The story focuses on how the impact of a parent’s deployment can be more problematic for younger children than it is with their older siblings.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Shy Girl”
Students from Hilo High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a severely shy female Hilo High student who came out of her shell after she found her niche in her schoolʻs media club.

 

“Miss Filipina Kauaʻi”
Kauaʻi High School Class of 2019 graduate Tiffany Sagucio gives a first-person account of her experience as a contestant in the 2019 Miss Filipina Kauaʻi Pageant. Tiffany produced this story as part of her Gwen Ifill Fellowship for young journalists, named after the iconic PBS NewsHour anchor who passed away from cancer in 2016.

 

“Raised Crosswalks”
Students from Waiʻanae High School in West Oʻahu tell the story of a new pedestrian protection measure launched on Farrington Highway in Waiʻanae—raised crosswalks.

 

“Fishing Line Recycling”
Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui report on an effort to reduce the amount of harmful fishing line discarded into our oceans.

 

“Poi Mill”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School show us how Native Hawaiian students are learning about their culture through the cultivation and presentation of taro.

 

“Kinai ʻEha”
Students at Kalāheo High School in Windward Oʻahu introduce us to a non-profit organization that provides workforce training for young people who are homeless, incarcerated or just looking for guidance.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 11|7|19:
A Second Chance and other stories

 

TOP STORY

“A Second Chance”
Students from Waiākea High School in the Hilo district of Hawaiʻi
Island tell the story of Easten Tanimoto, a young man who, under the influence of psilocybin (hallucinogenic mushrooms), climbed a telephone pole, was electrocuted, then fell to the ground, sustaining serious injuries and severe burns. After a miraculous recovery, Tanimoto has dedicated his life to speaking at schools and inspiring students to make better life choices.

 

ALSO FEATURED

“Veterans Mural”
Students from Maui High School in Kahului tell the story of a mural artist who forges a special connection with the war veterans from his community.

 

“Baseball Dad”
Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on the Garden Isle tell the story of a Kauaʻi man who raised two sons that became major league baseball players.

 

“Plastic Pollution”
Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului tell the story of Maui volunteers who are working to reduce plastic pollution in our oceans and on our beaches.

 

“Recycled Plastic Hale”
Students from Island School on Kauaʻi tell the story of the first building in the state to be built with blocks made of plastic waste.

 

“How to Make a Parol”
Students from Kalākaua Middle School on Oʻahu show us how to make a traditional Filipino Christmas decoration.

 

“Kapa Maker”
Students at Kalama Intermediate School on Maui introduce us to a master practitioner of a traditional Hawaiian form of textile-making.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students from Molokaʻi High School.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 10|31|19:
Kauaʻi Resilience Project and Other Stories

 

TOP STORY

 

“Kauaʻi Resilience Project”
Students from Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi tell the story of their community’s effort to address a serious problem with Kauaʻi’s youth. A 2018 study showed that 9% of high school students on Kauaʻi attempt suicide, and 28% reported feeling sad and worthless over extended periods of time. In response to these alarming facts, the Kauaʻi Resiliency Project was formed to create programs and opportunities for Kauaʻi’s youth that help them navigate life’s challenges.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

“Taiko for the Deaf”
In their HIKI NŌ debut, students from Hawaiʻi Baptist Academy in the Nuʻuanu district of Oʻahu tell the story of a taiko drumming class for the deaf held by the Taiko Center of the Pacific. The deaf students learn to drum through visual cues such as watching the person in front of them and through instructions from a sign language interpreter. Although they cannot hear the drums, they can feel the vibration of the drum beats through their bodies. They don’t consider their deafness as a limitation to taiko drumming and, as a result, their confidence and self-esteem are lifted through this activity.

 

“Martin Charlot”
Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island follow veteran painter Martin Charlot (son of legendary artist Jean Charlot) as he restores a mural he created 46 years ago for what is now called the Ellison Onizuka Gymnasium at Konawaena High School.

 

“Fire Knife Dancer”
Students from Kealakehe Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a fire knife dancer who is passing along this traditional Samoan art form to the next generation.

 

“Hawaiʻi Nature Center”
Students from McKinley High School on Oʻahu tell the story of a special place in Honolulu that connects family and children to nature: the Hawaiʻi Nature Center.

 

“Street Art Hawaiʻi”
Students from Sacred Hearts Academy on Oʻahu tell the story of a team of local artists who are beautifying the Kaimukī neighborhood of Honolulu with their colorful street paintings.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ also features a behind-the-scenes look at the 2019 HIKI NŌ Statewide Teachers Workshop.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ 10|24|19:
Archers to Art and Other Stories

 

TOP STORY:

 

“Archers to Art”
Students from Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha Public Charter School on Kauaʻi tell the story of how members of their school’s archery program created, through a process of problem solving, an activity that produces wildly colorful, spontaneous works of art. Student archers decided to place balloons onto the traditional archery targets with the intent of having the arrows burst the balloons. The wind caused the balloons to move around, so the students filled them with water to anchor them in place. They then decided to add paint to the water, and laid cardboard down to avoid messing up the surrounding area. Noticing the colorful designs the splatters created, they replaced the cardboard with watercolor paper. Thus was created this innovative genre of painting.

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

“Waimea’s Rain Rock”
Students from Hawaiʻi Preparatory Academy Middle School in the Waimea district of Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a legendary rain rock which was said to have saved Waimea from a devastating drought.

 

“Student Poet”
Students from Kauaʻi High School in Līhuʻe tell the story of a young poet who uses creativity to battle depression.

 

“Jiu Jitsu Preacher”
Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle School in Pukalani tell the story of a martial arts school that is also a place of worship.

 

“How to Care for an Abandoned Baby Bird”
Students from Īʻao School on Maui show us how to nurse an abandoned baby bird back to health.

 

“Betty Santoki”
Students from Farrington High School on Oʻahu introduce us to a Class of 1962 Farrington graduate who has dedicated her life to keeping Japanese traditions alive in her community.

 

“Suburbia”
A student at H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui shares her inner-most thoughts about becoming a filmmaker in a personal video essay.

 

This episode of HIKI NŌ is hosted by students at Montessori School of Maui in Makawao.

 

 

 

We Have a New Board Chair

 

CEO Message

 

Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO

Honolulu attorney Joanne Lo Grimes has taken the reins as Board Chair of PBS Hawaiʻi, succeeding Hilo business leader Jason Fujimoto, who remains an active Board Member.

 

Joanne, the former Board Vice Chair, is a 2019 Women Who Mean Business honoree, singled out by Pacific Business News. Originally planning to go into business, she earned a master’s degree in business administration. Later, she found that law was her calling. Her legal practice makes use of her training in business and as a certified financial planner, as she advises businesses, nonprofit organizations and trusts. She is the first woman Co-Chair and a partner of the 162-year-old law firm Carlsmith Ball. In her civic life, she recently served as President of the Legal Aid Society of Hawaiʻi.

Joanne Lo Grimes, New Board ChairI’ve seen that this wife and mother of three grown children is a master at balancing goals and priorities. Despite her many other obligations, she is fully present in her unpaid PBS Hawai‘i Board role. She is a keen listener, observer and analyst, with a positive outlook and a remarkable ability to synthesize information. Embracing complex challenges, she notes that people don’t hire lawyers when the answers are clear.

 

Joanne Lo Grimes
New Board Chair

Theresia McMurdo: New Board Member“These are times of great opportunity and challenge, and it’s an honor to help steward this precious community resource into the future,” Joanne says.

“I’m excited about the year ahead, as PBS Hawaiʻi completes the final year of its three-year strategic plan and develops a new strategic plan to guide us for the following three years.”

Theresia McMurdo
New Board Member

Ryan Kaipo Nobriga: New Board MemberJoanne’s fellow seasoned Board officers are Vice Chair Bettina Mehnert, President and CEO of Architects Hawaii; Treasurer Kent Tsukamoto, Managing Partner of Accuity Certified Public Accountants; and Joy Miura Koerte, a partner at Fujita & Miura Public Relations, based on Kauaʻi.

 
 

Ryan Kaipo Nobriga
New Board Member

Kūha‘o Zane, New Board MemberAnd we’re so pleased to welcome these new Board directors: Theresia McMurdo, Chief Operating Officer of the IT consulting company Cetra Technology; Ryan Kaipo Nobriga, Vice President of Finance at Hawaiian Dredging Construction; and Kūha‘o Zane, Creative Director of Hilo-based Sig Zane Designs and SZKaiao.

 

Kūha‘o Zane
New Board Member

 

I’m proud to work with this fine Board and my skilled staff in a rapidly evolving media landscape, mindful that we’re all here to serve the best interests of the people of Hawaiʻi.

Aloha Nui,

Leslie signature


 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
The 2018 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge – High School Division

 

This special edition features stories from the High School Division of the 2018 HIKI NŌ Fall Challenge. On October 19, 2018, ten participating high school teams and twelve participating middle school teams were given four days to complete a HIKI NŌ story based on the theme “the story behind the food”. Teachers could not provide hands-on help. The students had to conceptualize, research, arrange, shoot, write and edit their stories on their own. The completed stories were scored by members of the HIKI NŌ editorial board based on the following criteria:

 

  1. How well did the story capture the essence of the assigned theme?
  2. How well did the entry fulfill the HIKI NŌ  Story Criteria (the criteria used throughout the school year to determine which stories are approved to air on HIKI NŌ)?
  3. How much did production values (the quality of the cinematography, editing and sound) contribute to the overall effectiveness of the story?

 

Based on the cumulative scores, first place, second place, third place, and honorable mention awards were given in both the high school and middle school divisions. The winning high school stories featured in this episode are as follows:

 

–Tied for First Place: Kauaʻi High School in Lihue profiled the late Barbara Funamura, the originator of the spam musubi.

 

–Tied for First Place: Kamehameha Schools Maui High School in Pukalani profiled Maui chef Jonathan Mizukami.

 

–Second Place: H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui featured the family story behind Aunty Lia’s Baked Goods.

 

–Third Place: Kapa‘a High School on Kauaʻi spotlighted Pono Market in Kapaʻa.

 

–Honorable Mention: Farrington High School on Oʻahu revealed how much members of Hawaiʻi’s world championship little league team missed Hawai‘i food when they were on the road.

 

Also featured:

 

–Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island highlighted iconic Hilo eatery Kandi’s Drive-Inn.

 

–Moanalua High School on Oʻahu told the story of a young man who is carrying on his late father’s legacy through his family’s Chamorro Grindz food truck.

 

–Wa‘ianae High School on Oʻahu showed how a stay-at-home mom brought together her entire family through her Padicakes mochi business.

 

First place winners will receive $500 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Second place winners will receive $300 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Third place winners will receive $200 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program. Honorable mention winners will receive $100 worth of production equipment for their school’s media program.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Breaking Gender Norms and other stories

 

TOP STORY

 

“Breaking Gender Norms”
Students from McKinley High School on O‘ahu introduce us to their school’s quarterback, who happens to be a female. On August 19, 2017, McKinley sophomore Alexandria Buchanan became the first female varsity quarterback to start a game in Hawaiʻi. She recounts her progress from playing on the junior varsity team as a freshman to becoming the starting quarterback on the varsity team. “I’m proud I got this far,” says Buchanan, “I never expected to be on the varsity level, let alone starting as their quarterback. I take a lot of pride in it. I take a lot of pride in having my team and my coaches trust in me.” McKinley’s football coach and its athletic director also discuss how more and more females have been playing football in recent years, challenging the old perception that it is a sport strictly for men.

 

ALSO FEATURED

 

–Students from Maui Waena Intermediate School in Kahului, Maui, introduce us to a female intermediate school student who inspires younger students to embrace the wonders of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math).

 

–Students from Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi give us an inside look at their school’s building construction class.

 

–Students from Moanalua High School on Oʻahu shine a spotlight on a downtown-Honolulu arts organization: The Arts at Marks Garage.

 

–Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui High School introduce us to a young woman who has created a program that helps other young women build self-confidence and separate their sense of self-worth from social media.

 

–Students from Waimea High School on Kauaʻi present a profile in courage: a young girl who defeated cancer and gained strength and ambition from the experience.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Donut Dynamite and other stories

HIKI NŌ: Episode #1001 - Madame Donut and other stories

 

TOP STORY:

 

Students from H.P. Baldwin High School on Maui introduce us to a Filipino immigrant who legally changed her name to Madame Donut. Before opening Donut Dynamite in Wailuku, Maui, she attended culinary school, where one of her instructors was the pastry chef at the famous French Laundry Restaurant in California’s wine country. When she found out the restaurant had donuts on its menu, she decided to make donuts her medium for artistic expression. “I use the donuts kind of as a platform or a canvas to express my art and my life story,” Madam Donut says.

 

 

ALSO FEATURED:

 

Students from Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi show us how their high school auto-shop class has moved into the 21st Century.

 

Students from Kalama Intermediate School on Maui explore the incredible hula legacy of Kumu Naomi “Sissy” Lake-Farm.

 

Students from Punahou School on Oʻahu show us how to make a beautiful work of art from a dead fish.

 

Students from Kalani High School in East Honolulu introduce us to a young woman who has discovered who she is by mentoring younger children on the ways of the ocean.

 

Students from ‘Īao School on Maui tell the story of a 6th grader who has created a way to motivate her peers to volunteer for community service.

 

And students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island introduce us to a married couple who dedicates their lives, on and off the job, to foster children.

 

 

 

HIKI NŌ
Compilation Show from the Spring Quarter of the 2018-2019 School Year

 

This compilation show features some of the top stories from the Spring Quarter of the 2018-2019 school year. Besides being excellent stories, these pieces all explore the connections between people and, in some cases, between people and other living things.

 

Students from McKinley High School in Honolulu tell the story of teenagers who connect with senior citizens in ways that bridge the generation gap.

 

Students from Waiʻanae High School in Central Oʻahu tell the story of a young tattoo artist who uses his art form to connect with his Hawaiian heritage.

 

Students from Konawaena High School on Hawaiʻi Island feature a 96-year-old Holocaust survivor who connects with Big Island students by teaching them about the devastating effects of bigotry and racism.

 

Students from Hilo Intermediate School on Hawaiʻi Island focus on the special connection between a bone marrow donor and the recipient of that donation who discover (despite the astronomical odds against it happening) that they live just minutes away from one another.

 

Students from Kua O Ka Lā Miloliʻi Hipuʻu Virtual Academy on Hawaiʻi Island follow conservationists who are facilitating the connection between male and female members of an endangered Hawaiian crow in order to save the species from extinction.

 

Students from Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School on Kauaʻi introduce us to a singing nun who uses music to help students connect with the values she tries to instill in them.

 

Students from Maui High School in Kahului show us how a disabled student makes profound connections with her non-disabled peers through a program developed by the Special Olympics.

 

Students from Waiākea High School on Hawaiʻi Island tell the story of a pet placement service that connects homeless canines with their forever owners.

 

This special episode is hosted by Crystal Cebedo, a 2016 HIKI NŌ graduate from Waiʻanae High School on Oʻahu who has just completed her junior year at Menlo College in Northern California, where she majors in marketing and human resources.

 

 

 

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