Indie Lens Pop-Up

Photo Gallery – Indie Lens Pop-Up: ‘Chasing Trane’

On Tuesday, October 24, PBS Hawaiʻi and Hawaiʻi Women in Filmmaking kicked off a new season of our free community film screening series, Indie Lens Pop-Up. About 30 attendees enjoyed a free preview of Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary before its broadcast television debut on Monday, November 6 at 10 pm on Independent Lens.

 

Enjoy photos from the event! Click each image to enlarge.

 

Our next Indie Lens Pop-Up will be for I Am Not Your Negro on Wednesday, November 15 at 5:30 pm at PBS Hawaiʻi, 315 Sand Island Access Road. Attendance is free, and first-come, first-served!

 

 

I Am Not Your Negro

 

Free, public screening of I Am Not Your Negro

Wednesday, November 15, 2017, 5:30 – 8:00 pm

PBS Hawaiʻi, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu

A part of Indie Lens Pop-Up – Presented by PBS Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i Women in Filmmaking

 

In 1979, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his literary agent describing his next project, to be called Remember This House. The book was to be a revolutionary, personal account of the lives and successive assassinations of three of his close friends — Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. But at the time of Baldwin’s death in 1987, he left behind only 30 completed pages of his manuscript. Now, in his Oscar-nominated documentary I Am Not Your Negro, master filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished.

 

The result is a radical, up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, using Baldwin’s original words, spoken by Samuel L. Jackson, and a flood of rich archival material. I Am Not Your Negro is a journey into black history that connects the past of the Civil Rights movement to the present of #BlackLivesMatter. It is a film that questions black representation in Hollywood and beyond. And, ultimately, by confronting the deeper connections between the lives and assassination of these three leaders, Baldwin and Peck have produced a work that challenges the very definition of what America stands for.

 

Free Screening of Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary

 

Free, public screening of Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary

Tuesday, October 24, 2017, 5:30 – 8:00 pm

PBS Hawaiʻi, 315 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu

A part of Indie Lens Pop-Up – Presented by PBS Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i Women in Filmmaking

 

Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary is the first film in the 2017-2018 season of the Indie Lens Pop-Up community film screening series. Set against the social, political and cultural landscape of the times, Chasing Trane brings saxophone great John Coltrane to life, as a man and an artist. The film is the definitive look at the boundary-shattering musician whose influence continues to this day.

 

Chasing Trane features never-before-seen Coltrane family home movies, footage of Coltrane and his band in the studio (discovered in a California garage during the production of this film), along with hundreds of rare photographs and television appearances from around the world. Coltrane’s incredible story is told by the musicians who worked with him (Sonny Rollins, McCoy Tyner, Benny Golson, Jimmy Heath, Reggie Workman), musicians inspired by his fearless artistry and creative vision (Common, John Densmore, Wynton Marsalis, Carlos Santana, Wayne Shorter, Kamasi Washington), Coltrane’s children (Ravi, Oran, and step-daughters Michelle Coltrane and Antonia Andrews) and biographers, and well-known admirers such as President Bill Clinton and Dr. Cornel West.

Chasing Trane reveals the critical events, passions, experiences, and challenges that shaped Coltrane’s life and his revolutionary sounds. It is a story of demons and darkness, of persistence and redemption. Above all, it is the incredible spiritual journey of a man who found himself and, in the process, created an extraordinary body of work that transcends all barriers of geography, race, religion, and age. And naturally, the film is imbued throughout with Coltrane’s remarkable music.

Although Coltrane never did any television interviews (and only a handful for radio) during his lifetime, he has an active and vibrant presence in the film through thoughts he expressed during print interviews. These words—spoken by Academy Award winner Denzel Washington—illuminate what John Coltrane may have been thinking or feeling at critical moments throughout his life and career.


About The Filmmaker

John Scheinfeld is an Emmy®, Grammy® and Writers Guild Award nominee and writer/director/producer of documentaries for theatrical and television distribution. His films have premiered at Telluride, Toronto, Venice and IDFA and include The U.S. vs. John Lennon, Who Is Harry Nilsson (And Why Is Everybody Talkin’ About Him), We Believe, and Dick Cavett’s Watergate. In addition, Scheinfeld has written pilot scripts for drama series for ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox. He is a graduate of Oberlin College and received his MFA from Northwestern University.