PBS Hawai‘i

KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall



KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall

“KĀKOU” means “all of us.” But it doesn’t mean we all agree.

 

When we can speak to each other honestly and listen earnestly… When we recognize that we are all in this together… When we are engaged in working toward a common goal, that is “kākou.”

 

PBS Hawai‘i hosts a periodic series of live town hall events called KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall. You can email us with your thoughts in advance or during the live conversation at kakou@pbshawaii.org, or post on Twitter using the #pbskakou hashtag. The town hall will also be live streamed on pbshawaii.org and on Facebook Live, where you can also join the conversation.

 

 

Join The Conversation Online!
#PBSKakou

KĀKOU: HAWAI‘I'S TOWN HALL – Join the Conversation

 

Join the online conversation about KĀKOU by using the #PBSKakou hashtag on Twitter. See what your community has said so far!

 




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PBS HAWAI‘I: Home is Here

The November 2018 Program Guide

Allen Hoe: A Soldier’s Soldier
The PBS HAWAI‘I November 2018 Program GuideDownload the The PBS Hawaiʻi November 2018 Program Guide (PDF).

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The October 2018 Program Guide

POV: The Apology
The PBS HAWAI‘I October 2018 Program GuideDownload the The PBS Hawaiʻi October 2018 Program Guide (PDF).

Download the October Primetime Schedule (PDF).




 

 

 

NĀ MELE
Waipuna

 

Kale Hannahs, David Kamakahi and Matt Sproat of the acclaimed Hawaiian music group Waipuna present their interpretation of Hawaiian music, accompanied by hula dancer Jaimie Kennedy. From “Malama Mau Hawai‘i,” a selection from Waipuna’s first album, to “E Mau Ke Aloha,” composed by David’s father, Dennis Kamakahi, Waipuna will take you through a joyful musical cycle.

 

 

NĀ MELE
Keali‘i Reichel

NĀ MELE: Guest artist Keali'i Reichel

 

Keali‘i Reichel has long established himself as one of Hawai‘i’s premier artists. His dedication to the perpetuation of Hawaiian language, song, chanting and hula has evolved into unique and personal performances that showcase the depth of Hawaiian culture for international audiences. This performance, recorded at the PBS Hawai‘i studio, excellently showcases his artistry.

 

 

PBS Hawai‘i reschedules live KĀKOU town hall for Oct. 25

PBS HAWAI‘I – News Release

315 Sand Island Access Rd.| p: 808.462.5000| pbshawaii.org
Honolulu, HI 96819-2295| f: 808.462.5090

 

For questions regarding this press release, contact:
Liberty Peralta
lperalta@pbshawaii.org
808.462.5030­

 

Download this Press Release

 

September 11, 2018

 

PBS Hawaiʻi reschedules live KĀKOU town hall for Oct. 25Due to the unpredictability of Tropical Storm Olivia’s effects, PBS Hawai‘i has postponed its live statewide conversation about “The Future of Work” until Oct. 25. This KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall was originally scheduled for Thursday.

 

The two-hour live program with 40 studio participants and social media input will ask: Are we preparing ourselves and our children for a future where technology will transform the workplace – and our lives?

 

Representatives from government, business, labor, education and nonprofit organizations will come together for this community conversation about what’s referred to as “the fourth Industrial Revolution.” What does this revolution look like, and what do these transformational changes mean for Hawai‘i’s economy and employment landscape? Is this an opportunity to reshape the future of work in Hawai‘i?

 

The discussion airs on PBS Hawai‘i on Oct. 25 from 8:00 to 10:00 pm. A live stream will also be available on pbshawaii.org and PBS Hawai‘i’s Facebook page. Viewers are invited to join the discussion by emailing kakou@pbshawaii.org using the #PBSKakou hashtag on Twitter, or leaving a comment on the Facebook live stream.

 

KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall is a periodic series of live town hall-style discussions around pivotal topics that affect our Islands.

 


PBS Hawai‘i is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and Hawai‘i’s sole member of the trusted Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). We advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches people’s lives. We bring the world to Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i to the world. pbshawaii.org | facebook.com/pbshawaii | @pbshawaii


 

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Ohta-san: Virtuosity and Legacy

 

Herb Ohta is one of the giants of the ‘ukulele who snatched the simple four-stringed instrument out of the background and planted it firmly at the front of the stage. In this special, Herb Ohta, known as Ohta-San, brings his solo ukulele riffs to the PBS Hawai‘i studios, playing numbers such as “Rhapsody in Blue,” “The Girl from Ipanema,” and his chart-topping ballad, “Song for Anna.” He also teams up with his son, Herb Ohta Jr., for their take on the Hawaiian classics “Hi’ilawe” and “Sanoe.”

 

 

NĀ MELE
Jerry Santos

Na Mele: Jerry Santos

 

When we hear his distinctive voice, there is no mistaking the music of Jerry Santos. And when we listen to his lyrics, there is no mistaking his connection with the memories and emotions of our own lives. In this NA MELE, Jerry has woven together a story of home. “The idea of home was the driving force for the content. Most of the songs speak to the idea of ku‘u home, a personal, endearing way to refer to our place in the world. It becomes ku‘u because we attach to it our familiarity, what the wind and the rain are like, how the mountains smell, what is in the river, who our people are, our attachment to them and the things we have learned by being of a place,” Jerry says.

 

Jerry mixes “All of That Love from Here” with his signature song, “Ku‘u Home ‘O Kahalu‘u,” as well as “Tewe Tewe,” a playful song that pays tribute to the slippery o‘opu. He also performs “Seabird” and “Ku‘u Makamaka,” among other songs. Joining Jerry are musicians Kamuela Kimokeo and Hoku Zuttermeister.

 

 



PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Under a Jarvis Moon

 

This film tells the story of 130 young men from Hawaii who, from the late 1930s through the early years of World War II, were part of a clandestine mission by the U.S. federal government to occupy desert islands in the middle of the Pacific. The first wave of these colonists was a group of Hawaiian high school students, chosen because government officials assumed Pacific Islanders could best survive the harsh conditions present on the tiny, isolated islands. For the young men, who were unaware of the true purpose of their role as colonists, what ensued is a tale of intrigue, courage, and ultimately, tragedy.

 

 

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