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PBS HAWAI‘I: Home is Here

The February 2018 Program Guide

NA MELE: Weldon Kekauoha
Download the February 2018 Program GuideDownload the February 2018 Program Guide (PDF).

Download the February Schedule (PDF).


The January 2018 Program Guide

ROADTRIP NATION: Setting Course in Hawai‘i
The PBS HAWAI‘I January Program GuideDownload the January 2018 Program Guide (PDF).

Download the January Schedule (PDF).


 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
E Haku Inoa: To Weave a Name

 

A young multi-racial kanaka maoli (native Hawaiian) woman, filmmaker Christen Hepuakoa Marquez, sets out to discover the meaning of her incredibly lengthy Hawaiian name from her estranged mother, whose diagnosis as schizophrenic in the 80s caused their family separation. Christen not only discovers herself within the name, but gains a whole new perspective on the idea of sanity and how cultural differences can sometimes muddle its definition.

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Ohta-san: Virtuosity and Legacy

 

Herb Ohta is one of the giants of the ‘ukulele who snatched the simple four-stringed instrument out of the background and planted it firmly at the front of the stage. In this special, Herb Ohta, known as Ohta-San, brings his solo ukulele riffs to the PBS Hawai‘i studios, playing numbers such as “Rhapsody in Blue,” “The Girl from Ipanema,” and his chart-topping ballad, “Song for Anna.” He also teams up with his son, Herb Ohta Jr., for their take on the Hawaiian classics “Hi’ilawe” and “Sanoe.”

 

 

PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS
Under a Jarvis Moon

 

This film tells the story of 130 young men from Hawaii who, from the late 1930s through the early years of World War II, were part of a clandestine mission by the U.S. federal government to occupy desert islands in the middle of the Pacific. The first wave of these colonists was a group of Hawaiian high school students, chosen because government officials assumed Pacific Islanders could best survive the harsh conditions present on the tiny, isolated islands. For the young men, who were unaware of the true purpose of their role as colonists, what ensued is a tale of intrigue, courage, and ultimately, tragedy.

 

 

KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall:
Have You Fact-Checked Your Truth?

 

With ever-increasing divisions in our country, PBS Hawai‘i introduces a new series of live town hall events called KĀKOU – Hawai‘i’s Town Hall. In this first live discussion, we ask: “Have You Fact-Checked Your Truth?” We take on the meaning of “truth” and how we view truth in an era of “fake news,” “trolling” and filter bubbles on social media. Is there one truth – or is truth in the eye of the beholder?

 

You can email us with your thoughts in advance at kakou@pbshawaii.org, or post on Twitter using the #pbskakou hashtag. The town-hall will also be live streamed on pbshawaii.org and on Facebook Live, where you can also join the conversation.

 

 




Top 10 Facebook Stories from 2017

Feel like negative news dominated 2017? You might be surprised by which of our stories got the most attention this past year on Facebook.

 

1. American Epic – Joseph Kekuku and the Steel Guitar

Joseph Kekuku, regarded as the inventor of the steel guitar, is at the center of the Hawaiian slack key story. This American Epic episode traces his story, and the hybrid cultures evident in Tejano music, along with stories behind Cajun music and the music of the Hopi tribe.

 

2. HIKI NŌ Report by Wai‘anae High School – Max “Blessed” Holloway 

Students at Wai‘anae High School in West Oahu feature Wai‘anae High School graduate and UFC (Ultimate Fighting Championship) fighter Max Holloway, who feels it is his kuleana to represent the Wai‘anae community in the most positive way possible when he competes. Max also takes his responsibilities to his wife and young son very seriously. Having been severely neglected by his own parents, Max wants to make sure his son does not have to suffer the same sort of childhood.

3. PBS HAWAI‘I PRESENTS: The Navigators: Pathfinders of the Pacific

Directed by Sam Low and Boyd Estus, this documentary explores the heritage of Polynesian wayfinding, and how indigenous Pacific societies sustained their navigational practices and practitioners. The film features Mau Piailug, who was at that point the last known navigator to be ceremonially initiated on Satawal, an atoll in Micronesia’s remote Caroline Islands.

 

4. The Films of Eddie & Myrna Kamae – From the Heart

PBS Hawai‘i partnered with the Hawaiian Legacy Foundation to present a televised and online film festival, The Films of Eddie and Myrna Kamae, From the Heart. This showcase featured all 10 award-winning documentaries in Eddie and Myrna Kamae’s Hawaiian Legacy Series, released between 1988 and 2007.

 

5. HIKI NŌ Report by Kua o ka la PCS – Traditional Opelu Fishing

Students from Kua O ka La Miloli‘i Hipuu Virtual Academy Public Charter School on Hawai‘i Island tell the story of traditional opelu fishing in the remote South Kona fishing village of Miloli‘i. For many Miloli‘i residents, opelu fishing is more than a tradition—it is a means of survival. Families sell their catch as their main source of income and are trying to pass the practice down to their children so that the tradition and income source can continue.

 

6. Surfer Girls in Bangladesh

In Bangladesh’s only beach town, there are just a handful of girls who ride the waves. In fact, most people there frown upon seeing girl surfers, who have faced threats from conservative Muslims in the neighborhood. But surfing makes them feel empowered when they might otherwise be expected to assume traditional roles and marry before they become adults. Special correspondent Tania Rashid reports.

 

7. Hawai‘i’s Own and Their Stories: Ron Schaedel

Ron Schaedel, a retired Marine, touched on his struggle with post-traumatic stress syndrome, and his concern for his own sons in the military. “I’ve got PTSD to the max, I’m trying to deal with my own issues, and I’m worried about my two boys, but who’s the rock? My wife,” he said. “I owe my health and my life to my wife.” To this day, he said, “I take it a day at a time, and life goes on.”

 

8. Insights on PBS Hawai‘i: The Grades Are In

How did our State senators and House representatives do during the 2017 legislative session? Legislative leaders and journalists graded this session – see if you agree with them on this INSIGHTS.

 

9. Most Likely to Succeed 

Most Likely to Succeed examines the history of education in the United States and reveals the shortcomings of conventional education in today’s modern world. The documentary also follows students at High Tech High, a network of San Diego charter schools that promotes hands-on, project-based learning, with the goal of producing real-world workforce and life skills.

 

10. Insights on PBS Hawai‘i: The Airbnb-ing of Hawai‘i 

Short-term vacation rental companies like Airbnb are changing the tourism industry – and quite possibly your neighborhood. Opponents of this phenomenon say illegal or “underground” vacation rentals drive up housing prices and change the character of neighborhoods. Airbnb proponents say it has stabilized Hawai‘i’s housing market. Local data indicates 19 percent of homeowners partner with Airbnb to avoid foreclosure, and 60-65 percent participate so they can afford to stay in their homes. Differing perspectives on this issue are heard on this INSIGHTS.

 

BONUS: Top image from our social media pages

 

NA MELE
Keali‘i Reichel

Keali'i Reichel on Na Mele

 

Keali‘i Reichel has long established himself as one of Hawai‘i’s premier artists. His dedication to the perpetuation of Hawaiian language, song, chanting and hula has evolved into unique and personal performances that showcase the depth of Hawaiian culture for international audiences. This performance, recorded at the PBS Hawai‘i studio, excellently showcases his artistry.

 

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